Animal Stories - Eastern Gray Squirrel


Animal-World Information about: Eastern Gray Squirrel

   The Gray Squirrel is perhaps the most familiar of all squirrels!
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Cortney - 2011-08-28
Today we had a big wind storm and i heard squealing so i ran out and looked around i found 3 baby squirrels on the ground i read up and found they were about 3 weeks old... i really would like to help them but not sure how please give me the bestttt advice you have i dont want them to die.

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  • mary - 2011-09-09
    Puppy milk is the best milk that is close to the mom. If you are interested in giving them away please let me know. If need anything else here's my email jeanwinemiller@yahoo.com
    thank you
    mary
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lise - 2009-09-30
How very, very sad that people would keep a wild animal such as a squirrel for a pet when there are so many dogs, and cats that need homes. These animals get put down everyday.

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  • naturegirl - 2010-03-08
    yes how very sad indeed when it is plain to see that an animal such as a squirrel would much rather be wild. however as with many things there are or can be extenuating circumstances. i hand raised my squirrel from aboout 3 weeks old. her mother had become a road pancake, she and her sibblings wiggled and fell from the nest. a local vet would only take 2, a hawk had taken the other. i feel blessed to have rescued daisy. not many people have the ability or desire to care for a squirrel they are very needy and taking the proper care of them is difficult. there are some squirrels for one reason or another that may never be released into the wild again. some people ofcourse release them quite successfully but being a caregiver to a squirrel i now see both sides. what is even sadder is that there are people such as yourself who as an animal lover would seem to turn their back on such a helpless little creature all because they have not been domesticated. there are many people who do not have the capability of having a cat or dog, but have had the good fortune of rescuing a squirrel. yes many good dogs and cats are put down everyday, many squirrels are eaten in the wild or are carelessly run down by the unsuspecting or uncaring driver. so because they are wild do they not also desrve a chance at survival? when i read comments like yours it leaves me wondering just what you might do if your "rescued dog" dropped a helpless baby squirrel at your feet. before making such bold and generalized statements i hope this enlightens you and others like you to your ignorance on this matter.
  • christina vannostrand - 2010-03-22
    People have these animals as pets because at the time the squirrel needed to be saved. You can't just get an adult squirrel and make it tame. Most of the time wildness sets in and you must let them back to the wild. I have rescued many squirrels in my 30 yrs. I have rescued them as early as a couple days old. Even with constant hands on affection mother nature stepped in and I let them go behind my house in the country where 3 yrs later they are still back there, you can't get near them but they seem very happy and healthy.
  • kathie limehouse - 2010-04-07
    Maybe they want a squirrel and not a dog or cat. Live and let live.
  • Mark - 2010-04-09
    How do you weigh a life? Is a dogs more important that a squirrel? Just be thankful there are people out there taking care of animals in need; no matter size or shape.
  • Harry Hotshoe - 2010-04-15
    Hey, easy there. Just because someone has a Gray Squirrel for a pet doesn't mean they have foregone any concern for your favourites. I actually dislike dogs and cats, but you may have all you wish and I wish you the best. I would not assume to push my love of hogs on you as example.
  • Kas - 2010-04-16
    Not everyone wants another dog or cat. And what about people who only get cats for pets? Are they bad people because they didn't adopt a dog so they may as well have killed puppies themselves? Don't be ridiculous.

    Besides, most of us who take in wild animals do it to save the animal's life. I have a squirrel right now that was brought to me unweaned and with a broken arm.
  • chris - 2010-05-10
    Don't be a kill joy she saved one of god's creatures, they are all equal is his eyes.
  • Anonymous - 2010-05-19
    And squirrels are either run over or eaten or catch awful diseases. Their average life in the wild is one year. In captivity they can live up to 20. They are intelligent playful affectionate animals with great personalities, they are a lot less maintenance than a dog. Choosing a pet or letting a pet choose you is a very personal thing you shouldn't be so quick to judge.
  • Anonymous - 2010-06-16
    I have bottle fed an infant squirrel who was abandoned. He is now 6 months old and refuses to leave home. He is taken out every morning to run free in the trees and returns to me every evening when I come home from work. I do not entice him with food to get him to return. He is gentle and has become increasingly affectionate. He eats a balanced diet of things he would eat in the wild both on his own and from me. Would you call this sad?
    Squirrels do not live in groups in nature they are solitary except for mating season. In nature the mortality rate is 50% in two years. Protected in this situation he could live over ten years. The record is twenty. Do some research before you condemn situations that you obviously know nothing about. By the way...we have three rescued dogs and three rescued cats and a rescued Amazon parrot who all live the life of Riley. We have raised and released 3 orphaned raccoons and another squirrel who did chose his freedom. John...Dayton Ohio
  • Meaghan3130 - 2010-06-17
    A squirrel is wild by definition. This definition given only by us, humans. Squirrels can be trained, tame, they are great company, and can even be litter trained. The reason there is so many dogs & cats that need homes is because they are so easy to come by people neglect to realize the care they need. No one spays or neuters their dogs and cats. That is definitely a problem you should be bringing up the the hundreds of people on websites such as Kijiji giving away their felines and canines this very minute.

    As to peoplehaving squirrels, there is no problem with that. People such as myself did a wonderful thing by saving a baby squirrel from being poked to death with sticks from children. I brought him back to health and raised him as if he was my child. We grew a bond, and he grew a bond with my family. I taught him to surive in the wild and tried to release him several times but he chose to come to my back door and make noises until he was let in.

    Just because a squirrel is defined by one person as wild does not mean they cannot survive indoors and make not only a good pet, but a good companion as well.
  • Anonymous - 2010-07-15
    Yeah, so do squirrels...
  • erin - 2010-08-26
    it is sad that cats and dogs get put down, but some people are unable to care for a cat or walk a dog, and a squirrel makes a fun interesting pet!
  • Urza - 2010-09-03
    How very very sad that some people think it's very sad to keep a grey squirrel that has been rescued or would it have been more humane to let it die and adopt a dog or cat? Not all people like dogs and cats.
  • dancn4dinner - 2010-09-14
    I don't think people choose to have them as a pet, but if left unattended they would die also? Would you walk by an orphaned squirrel and think "how very, very sad, I think I'll leave him to die". And then run off to adopt a cat or dog?
  • Emily - 2010-09-28
    Rescuing wild animals is a good thing, I have raised 12 squirrels on my own, and they are very healthy and happy. All of them have lived well over their life expectancy, which is only 5 years. I have one that is 11! Wild animals need to be saved too, sometimes you can't pick and choose, you just have to do the right thing.
  • dee - 2010-09-29
    If you found a baby squirrel with no way of feeding itself would you walk away? People who give stray dogs and cats homes also try to help a baby squirrel. After it is raised by humans it can not always be turned back to the wild.
  • Anonymous - 2010-10-08
    How very sad that people breed cats and dogs to such a point that there are too many! It's choice and if some member of the public brings someone a small animal that can't look after itself most humane folk would help.
  • georgie - 2010-10-21
    We rescued a squirrel we never asked for it to be a pet, and we do already have a dog. Tonight the squirrel had a fit now we're trying to help it back to health before releasing it back to the wild. :)
  • Dollene Davidson - 2011-07-15
    I adopt and care for dogs (3), cats (6) AND my little squirrel Munson...who is really sick. That is how I found this web-site. My animals have all had their shots, heartworm meds and monthly flea treatment. They all eat better than I feed myself and have been to the dentist more in the past three years than I have. My squirrel was brought to me by my cat. I live in Florida 500 ft. from the beach, but am on an island, with tons of trees around my home. Munson was blown out of a nest during a Nor-easter. I thought it was a big roach. He had no hair and his eyes were not open. For a year, Munson went everywhere I went. I tried to release him...trained and prepared him for that day...he would not go. He chose me....I am his mama and the only one that can touch him.
  • Dollene Davidson - 2011-07-15
    Lisa...please read down because I left you a message about your comment. I own many adopted dogs and cats...they are fed, taken to the vet and get better dental care than I provide for myself. I also foster animals when I can for our local island shelter. My little squirrel was brought to me by my cat many years ago. What would you have prefered for me to do...stomp him like a bug??? I searched for a rescue team and no one would take him in a 200 mild area. I live on an island. I researched how to raise him and kept in touch with a woman who had raised over 2500 orphaned squirrels. I took Munson to work with me everyday to make sure he got his 2 hour feeding. I taught him to go to the bathroom and watched him, when he first opened his eves. I tried to release him into the wild...gradually...and he would not go. I hunted for people with acreage off of the island who would let him go...he came back to his HUGE nice cage, that is in my room. Now he is dying and I am trying to save him...or, should I just let him die and go to a shelter and get another dog or cat to ease my pain?
  • Dollene Davidson - 2011-07-15
    Lisa...please read down because I left you a message about your comment. I own many adopted dogs and cats...they are fed, taken to the vet and get better dental care than I provide for myself. I also foster animals when I can for our local island shelter. My little squirrel was brought to me by my cat many years ago. What would you have prefered for me to do...stomp him like a bug??? I searched for a rescue team and no one would take him in a 200 mild area. I live on an island. I researched how to raise him and kept in touch with a woman who had raised over 2500 orphaned squirrels. I took Munson to work with me everyday to make sure he got his 2 hour feeding. I taught him to go to the bathroom and watched him, when he first opened his eves. I tried to release him into the wild...gradually...and he would not go. I hunted for people with acreage off of the island who would let him go...he came back to his HUGE nice cage, that is in my room. Now he is dying and I am trying to save him...or, should I just let him die and go to a shelter and get another dog or cat to ease my pain?
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Anonymous - 2011-09-05
I have 2 dogs, 2 cats, 2 ferrets and a pet squirrel :) if someone wants to save an animal they will regardless of what they already have... No sense in judging people for trying to do what's right for an innocent helpless animal... I think it's actually very sad that anyone thinks it's right to put down other people for doing the right thing especially when the world is already so full of selfish inconsiderate people that wouldnt think twice to help a baby squirrel who couldn't even feed itself. Most people just think oh its wild that's where it needs to stay but really they know deep down that this animal needs help... They just don't care. I think it's great everyone on this site who has gone out of their way to help an animal in need wild or not.... keep it up :) and please ignore the people who have anything negative to say about it!!

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  • Anonymous - 2011-09-05
    Yup and if they arent that's their choice but the people that do help animals in need such as squirrels shouldnt be bashed just because they are born wild!!
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t. - 2008-09-01
Whole milk for humans will kill your squirrels, don't do it! Get them to a rescue center right away!

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  • A - 2011-08-01
    Kitten milk is the best.
    You can be as good a mother to the baby as the squirrel mom.
    Also get real baby cereal and mix with h2o or kitten milk.
    Keep the baby warm , even in hot weather.
  • Anonymous - 2011-09-05
    Actually kitten milk isnt so good for them either it has a harsh affect on their kidneys... the best thing for them is puppy milk :)
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victoria romero - 2011-06-07
Hi I have a grey 6 week old baby squirrel Mitch. Last week he was running around all happy and eating well. Now he wont eat and he doesn't move any more. I picked him up to feed him and he just laid on his back squinting his black eyes. I've been giving him puppy formula and water. He wouldnt eat fruits. Now he doesn't even accept his water any more. I'm scared he will die. My mom said he is sick. Please help me. I hope you guys can save Mitch.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-06-07
    Sounds like you have a sick little fella there. You can try giving him pedialyte and any kind of mashed up nuts. Outside of that, the only thing I can think of for you to do would be to see if their is a wild life rehabilitator around you somewhere. I am sorry your little guy is ill.
  • brandon - 2011-06-15
    Might just be constipated, try a small dose of natural laxative.
  • Ann Ausburn - 2011-07-06
    He needs calcium, get it into him fast. Try giving him some whole milk. Then give him rodent food that is high in calcium. Hope he gets better.
  • shannon - 2011-07-07
    PLEASE get a dropper and give him orange gatorade thats what he needs cause he is dehydrated. Hurry hurry and do it! Make it take tiny drop at a time be patient but serious don't let him choke. If he snorts etc. and it comes out nose have paper towel ready! This will work ! I will pray to the goddesses for him. P.s My squirrel named Squirt is now 11 months and it took six months to get the orange gatorade dye out of his chin hair (funny).
  • Brenda - 2011-07-07
    I'm thinking this is way too late but puppy & kitten formula kills squirrels. They will do fine for a few weeks then they die. They can't handle the preservatives in it & unfortunately every website out there tells you to feed them that & pedialite which is crap too. The best thing is scalded cow milk. A cup of whole milk with a tablespoon of plain or vanilla yogurt & a vitamin e capsule. They need a lot of calcium for the bones in their legs to grow & if they don't get it they will just go limp & they will drag them. For the best info on squirrels look up Clarissa Summers squirrel nutrition. She has been raising them for over 25yrs. Hope this wasn't too late. -Brenda
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Sylvia - 2011-01-09
We had 2 baby squirrels that the mother got killed and the little girl didn't make it but the boy was doing great. We have a very big cage and keep it clean and fed and water them until big enough to let go in our yard. We were just waiting for the weather in FL got warm enough and starting yesterday he is dragging his back legs. We raised one before that that happened to and he got the use of legs back and is still around our yard because he likes the pecans I put out. Could you tell me why this happens with their back legs?

Thanks Sylvia

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  • Carolyn Gosling - 2011-03-16
    He may have MBD, Metobolic Bone Disease. If he does not get the proper vitamins, they will get this. My squirrel got this. He fell off of my computer table where he was living and he couldn't move his legs. The movement came back. I researched and called rehabilitation places and they told me he probably had MBD. It will affect their back legs and will be permanent. Put him on calcium right away or he will die. This causes a lot of pain and they won't be very active. Mine stayed on calcium for two months. He got over it and is doing great. He is ready to be released. He use to be scared of outside but now he will jump off of you he is so excited. They only thing is he won't climb a big tree. He was frightened yesterday and ran to my monkey grass instead of up a tree. Unless he can climb a tree he will not be able to be released. One more thing, when he was on the calcium his teeth grew excessive because he did not feel like chewing. If they do they will need to be clipped. Hope this helps.
  • Anonymous - 2011-05-04
    HE NEEDS CALCIUM! GOOGLE IT! IF HE DOES NOT GET IT SOON...HE WILL FOR SURE DIE!! FIND ME ON FACEBOOK IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS. I RAISE VERY HEALTHY SQUIRRELS.
  • Deanna Crownover - 2011-05-23
    Both earlier posters are correct. MBD is the result of an improper diet given while in captivity. The first squirrel must have found the proper wild foods in time to save himself. Almonds are a better choice (raw) than pecans because of the nutrients. Offer him rodent block so he gets calcium carbonate, broccoli, cherry tomatoes leaves from greens such a collards, magnolia buds in spring, magnolia cones in summer, pine buds and bark, etc.
  • Ann Ausburn - 2011-07-06
    CALCIUM!!!!!!!!!!!! Can't state it enough.
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Jessica DeAlmeida - 2011-06-16
I have raised squirrels for years but I have never had a lone baby before, once they get ready to go they start to get a little mean. This little girl I have now adores me, she wants nothing more than to play with me, touch me, cuddle me. For some reason I can't get the wildlife place to call me back to release her (due to the wild cats in my area they always release them for me). I am afraid that she has imprinted on me and even if I do release her on my own that she will seek people out...should I keep her as a pet? I want to do what is best for her, any advice would be great!!!!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-06-17
    My grandma raised a baby squirrel from a few days old and the squirrel got so attached to her it just stuck to her like glue. She had a really large (maybe 3 feet) bird feeder that went across the entire kitchen window where she would feed the birds. She started feeding the squirrel in that feeder with the kitchen window open. The window was right against the kitchen table. The squirrel would venture out the window and then come running back in and eat its sunflower seeds etc. Finally, the squirrel just ventured out a little and a litle more. She finally started to live more outside than inside but always came back every morning and my grandma would open the window and the squirrel would come in. She actually came back with her babies finally. Grandma just let her live in the kitchen, giving her a small cardboard box and a blanket to sleep on. I don't know or remember if there were problems as I was about 10 but I could pet the squirrel.
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deanna - 2011-04-19
Help, I found a baby squirrel in my garage and it has an injured leg. It looks pretty young, but I think it is old enough to be on its own. We have placed it in a cage with a shoe box full of stuff to cuddle in. We gave it water, cracked corn and bird seed. Is there anything else I need to know, as far as nutrition? We may have inherited another animal, this one may be staying a while. By the time its leg is better it may not want to leave.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-04-19
    Article attached on Grey Squirrel - just clink on it for additional information. Is their a wildlife rehabilitation facility close to where you are? If so, that might be a good solution in case his leg is broken.
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Andrea in Ontario - 2010-11-27
Hi there fellow squirrelers!
I've noticed id some of the comments that Eastern grey infants are being raised on kitten formula. This is not a good idea. Please, use either a specialized formula, or what I use and have had great success with is ESBILAC puppy formula - powder, mixed in a ratio of 1:1.5 powder to boiled water. It is much better for satisfying their protein requirements.
Both of my 'squirrel-girls' have been released, as they were happy healthy specimens. They have built dreys in our area and come every day morning and evening (at the least) to feed on the variety of goodies I place out for them. I have about 20 or so identifiable squirrels who frequent my yard. :)

An excellent reference for help is 'the squirrel board' (google it); there are many rehabbers and vets as moderators there who can help you in finding help in your area and offer SKILLED advice as to how to handle any situations that may arise. :)

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  • Julie - 2010-12-26
    I have rescued an Eastern Grey as well and have had him since Aug. when he fell from a tree. He has been an amazing little companion.. and has been happy and healthy, a part of the family. Unfortunately he slipped out the door today and now that it is 17 degrees outside and darkness has fallen, I am sick with worry that he will not survive the cold night with no nest and hardly any adult fur...I've put out his cage with bedding and food..do you think he can survive the cold without being adjusted to living in an environment that is less than 70 degrees?
  • Jan - 2011-03-23
    Andrea, what do you feed your squirrels?
    I have a small condo deck and I feed the squirrels non-salted shelled peanuts and some acorns that I buy out of state. I like watching them and their antics, but they do dig a lot of my flowers out of the pots! And they have sliced my chaise lounge cover, but that's the way it goes. Some neighbors may not like the sound when they run around and over the fence and into the trees.
    Due to the bird feeders, I found a table that the RATS can't jump on top of, so I can put the peanuts and other stuff for squirrels up there.
    I have to take my 3 bird feeders down each night, otherwise now they climb up the poles at night and eat lots of seed.....well, it's their space too I guess.
    I also feed finches from hanging feeders, and hummingbirds.
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ToTodunderer - 2010-04-15
I found a baby squirrel and raised her to be a pet. When she was large enough I let her play with my four cats. At first the cats looked at her as a meal ticket due to their natural predatory instincts. The siamese, who is a naturally good hunter, was the first to attack. She leaped on the little squirrel and went for the throat. Her attack was fast and furious. They went round and round like the well known cartoon skirmishes where only parts stick out of the small tornado for maybe three seconds then there was this awful cry and the siamese stopped cold, the squirrel upside down and still between her feet.

The siamese limped away, nursing a bitten toe. The squirrel rolled over, walked over to one of the other cats, but that cat was a bit shy, so the squirrel found another to play with. That single fight was the beginning and end of the squirrel-cat battles in our house.

That was about a year ago, Now the cats all know better than to pick on a full grown squirrel. There have been a few other fights, usually cat-to-cat, but seldom is the squirrel involved. Squirrels are faster, with better reaction time and they fight back well. They can out jump a cat and can hide (if necessary) in much smaller places. Usually the squirrel ignores the cats, except at play time--then she is right in there having as much romping fun at the cats. Where the cats climb the trees in the yard, the squirrel absolutely runs up them, leaping vertically from each piece of bark. They are lightening unleashed.

The interesting thing about cats and squirrels, is where teeth are concerned, the cats actually bite with caution. They know that a broken tooth or a wound means death. A squirrel can break a tooth and it will grow out, and injury may mean death due to a slow escape, but it is not so certain.

So, when a squirrel and cat fight, the cat will be slow to bite. When it does, the sharp fangs, unless they penetrate something vital, both hurt less than a squirrel bite and are far less damaging. Cats kill by suffocating larger species, not biting to kill. Squirrels, when they bite, put the pressure of four forward facing teeth that are built to strip bark, crush nuts, and and can chew metal pieces off. Those bites are extremely painful. A predator will not attack a species it cannot use as food. When they learn that a species is dangerous, they leave it alone.

I watched a new squirrel in the neighborhood actually not get concerned when my four cats approached. It hopped along looking for nuts, surrounded by cats. When one of the cats popped out a test swat, the squirrel, a large Eastern Gray, turned instantly and assumed a defensive posture, standing a bit tall. The cats backed up. It was not bothered and is still here. I saw this before I allowed my squirrel to be with them.

While the cats bring home the occasional animal, it's never a squirrel.

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  • Animal Kingdom - 2010-12-16
    I don't believe this... plain and simple...
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