Animal Stories - Pet Racoon


Animal-World Information about: Pet Racoon

   Here is a raccoon up past his bedtime! This younster couldn't keep still, climbed all over everybody and was constantly "checking things out"!
Latest Animal Stories
MALLERY - 2010-03-22
I recently took in a coon that is somewhere from 1-2 yrs old. She was raised by people since she was born and now they are tired of having her so she came to my house. She is showing signs of aggression toward the dogs and my husband. The previous owner said that the coon has grown up with dogs and mine are not trying to harm her just smelling her. Is this something that i should be concerned about? I know it is their breeding season and i know she is scared because of the new environment. Just wondering, is there anything I could do to make her more comfortable?

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wildliferehabiter - 2010-02-01
SunChaser, with all due respect, I knew someone would fail to see my point. Whether it's fear or whatever that causes any mammal to exhibit aggression, we as the "superior" species (which could be questioned) should first and foremost NOT invite it by "cornering" or even trying to "tame" a wild species. If you live within a 30 minute drive of your neighbor, you don't live in the country, you are simply rural. Too many people don't recognize the signs of fear driven aggression or just plain meanness, which also exists in animals. We have run into so many folks that dump thier pets. Racoons, skunks, and possom as well as dogs and cats, and here lately with the depression of the horse market, horses of all ages and condition. They think that they will either be taken in by a friendly farmer/rancher or will go back to the wild even though they have been raised since a baby by people that wanted an exotic pet. Please, just leave them alone and take responsiblility for your actions when you own any kind of animal. You probably wouldn't believe how many horses and other "pets" we end up having to put down every year because people just don't understand how much it takes to have a pet, any pet, exotic or not. They reach sexual maturity and become agressive, they get tired of the kids pulling their tail, whatever. They get dumped and end up starving or torn up by really wild animals, stomped by a cow, etc. And they DO NOT just naturally know how to take care of themselves when you turn them out. Dogs and cats rarely make it through the first night. They are a meal for the first coyote that hears them crying. Most of the exotics fall prey to the coyotes too. I'm sorry, but most of you just don't know what it is like to truly live out so far that most people don't even know we are here.

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Bert Zeller - 2009-11-26
We are staying in a cabin just north of Gatlinburg, TN. After reading the guest book we found that this particular cabin has a nightly visitor, Rocky the Racoon. Sure enough at eight o'clock last night, Rocky appeared as advertised by knocking on the back sliding glass door. We were a little scared at first to open the door, but soon found ourselves feeding him by throwing scraps of food, which soon turned to hand feeding him food. He was so gentle, obviously very use to the guests who stay in this cabin. He laid at the back door until we went to bed. Hoping to see him again tonight. My wife is planning his thanksgiving dinner.

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JOANA :) - 2009-11-26
I had 2 pet racoons as a child in my country. Awesome, loving, and intelligent animals! I bottle fed the 2nd. He was a dream! how do I get a baby racoon here?

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JOANA :) - 2009-11-26
I had 2 pet racoons in my country and want one now... how do I get a baby racoon ?

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wildlife rehabilitator - 2009-09-09
My friend had a pet raccoon which she kept in an outdoor cage. This raccoon lived to be 22 years of age.
Many times younger orphaned raccoons were put into the cage with her and she never bothered any of them.
She was wormed on a yearly basis with strongid T and was healthy throughout her life.

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Tammy - 2009-09-05
We raised a pet racoon over 6 years ago. She was raised in the house until she was five months old, then transfered to a large cage complete with climbing limbs etc. then we began to let her out daily for longer and longer periods of time. She was always very tame even as she made her a home in the woods. Today, we can still go outside and call her and she'll come home within 15-20 minutes. She lives closeby and has raised several litters of beautiful babies. When she is pregnant or has a new litter, she comes around more often for food. Her favorite treat was always Hot Dogs, so we try to keep a package on hand for her visits. We no longer try to pick her up, although I believe she would allow it, but she loves scratches behind the ears and eating from our hands. She has never attempted to bite. She and my 14 year old cat coexist without conflicts. Friends and family come hoping she'll make an appearance--she shows out for a laugh and cautiously accepts strangers. A raccoon is an extremely smart and resourceful animal with a friendly disposition but please do not forget that a wild or scared raccoon can be very dangerous. Just ask someone that hunts them. They can rip a dog to pieces in a fight and as I understand, are one of the largest carriers of Rabies in the wild. It terrifies me to think of a child being rough with a Coon that is not used to children. Would I raise another? Yes! Abby never forgot us and knows where to come when food is scarce for her. But everyone please be careful when taking one that you rescue. Better safe than sorry. Rabies shots are very painful--I received my series of shots over 30 years ago after picking up a stray cat and would hate to undergo another set. Back then, it was one shot a day for 14 days in the stomache--don't know what is done now. I love all animals and don't wish to offend anyone but when we think with our hearts, sometimes, we forget to use basic common sense.

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zachsmom - 2009-08-31
I have an 11 year old raccoon named suzy. She seems to be losing a lot of weight, should I take her to the vet, or draw blood and have them check it. I am really concerned

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SHANELLE - 2009-08-26
Joyce to your response, you cannot be "immune" to rabies. You get a shot that lasts ONLY 7 years. Kids don't just get rabies as a typical shot so your son was NOT immune to it... get a REAL P.H.D, not one printed off off the internet... get your facts straight before comming up with some story you thought was cute and would help people.

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giggle - 2009-08-11
Yeah, I used to hate raccons, always costing me tons of money because they break in my house and eat my food. But I recently saved a 3 month old baby one from starvation, and I have to say they make great pets.

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