Animal Stories - Small Animal Pets


Animal-World info on Holland Lop Rabbits
Animal Story on Holland Lop Rabbits
List Animal Stories on Holland Lop Rabbits
More info at Animal-World
autumn - 2014-10-05
i just bought a holland lop and its so calm i love her

Click For Replies (1)
  • Tina - 2014-10-08
    Where did you find it, I'm in Long Beach,CA. I can not find the place has the holland lop, could you share the source to me, Thank,,
Reply
Animal-World info on Dwarf Hotot Rabbit
Animal Story on Dwarf Hotot Rabbit
List Animal Stories on Dwarf Hotot Rabbit
More info at Animal-World
Anonymous - 2014-09-21
Where can we find a dwarf hotots??

Click For Replies (1)
  • cat - 2014-10-05
    I have one for sale
Reply
Animal-World info on American Guinea Pig
Animal Story on American Guinea Pig
List Animal Stories on American Guinea Pig
More info at Animal-World
Eleanor - 2007-04-02
The basics about the care of guinea pigs:

Guinea pigs need at least five hours every day on grass in a reasonably sized, covered partially (with plastic or wood; for shade and for protection) chicken wire run, regardless if it's rainy or sunny. It's essential to put a small box with woodshavings and hay inside the run, so they can sleep during the daytime.
At night, you may choose whether to have a large outdoor cage, or a large box in the house to house your guinea pigs in. Indoor cags can be obtained, but these are rarely big enough for the guinea pig, and are widely impractical. In any case, shelter should have the essentials;
newspaper/magazines- to absorb any leakage or liquid waste.
woodshavings- to absorb any liquid. These should thickly cover the newspaper.
Hay- bedeck shelter with this bedding material in excess. This is a staple food, bedding, and even toy for guinea pigs.
Food bowl- containing plenty of fresh dry food.
Selection of fresh fruit and vegetables.
Food plays a large part in your guinea pigs life. Hay, grass, dry food, and carrots are needed in large amounts by any domestic guinea pig. (water is not neccesary, contrary to popular belief. Guinea pigs often do not utilise water bottles or water bowls; instead, source their water from foods such as tomato, lettuce, celery, or cucumber- guinea pigs will respond enthusiasticly to these in comparison with other hydrating techniques.)
Fresh food that is great for guinea pigs includes-
carrots, apple, pear, clery, sprouts, cabbage, turnip, grass, lettuce, leaves, plum, berries, etcetera.
You'll find that guinea pigs have wise judgement, and won't go near anything that they don't like or that is remotely harmful to them. Some guinea pigs are very fussy with food; don't indulge them in their fussiness, as this will lead to later inconveniences and fussy preferences. Instead, give them as much of that particular food as you would under usual circumstances; they will then eat it gladly and get used to it, whilst being well nourished. Of course, be sure to accurately draw the line between giving them harmful food as opposed to food that they simply don't like.
Give them three choices of fresh food every evening, and refill their food bowl with dry food whenever the level goes past halfway down the bowl. Some brands of dry food which I find appealing to guinea pigs are
Supa Guinea dry food
Wagg Guinea pig
Gerty Guinea pig dry food
Brush your guinea pig's coat every week, and bathe them gently every two months to mantain ultimate standards for your guinea pig's looks.
Guinea pig brushes can easily be bought from a local pet shop, but a large toothbrush or soft bristle brush will be equally substantial.
To bath a guinea pig;
A guinea pig can be bathed in either a full size bath, a sink, or a basin.
It would be unhygienic to bath guinea pigs in a sink, but would give them added security to be bathed in a small space.
Basins are ideal, since they comfort the guinea pig because of its confined space, and are clean for guinea pigs to use.
A bath will be good for releasing guinea pig's pent up energy, but they'll be more frightened in such a large space, it will waste water, and be unhygienic.
Guinea pigs will be scared during bathtime, and will often try to either jump out or cling onto one's hand. This is no cause for concern. They will recover completely if placed in a warm, comforting hay box with plently of care, attention, and special treat foods, such as banana (don't give them this as a regular food, as it doesn't wear down their teeth well enough, and is too sweet for them to eat on a regular basis).
First, buy some guinea pig shampoo/ mild tea tree shampoo fro any chemist's or pet shop. Hsve a large, fluffy towel ready, and a brush.
Fill the {basin} {3/4} of the way full (depending on the size of the guinea pig) with tepid water. Place the guinea pig in it gently, yet firmly. Lather your guinea pigs coat with a small squeeze of shampoo. Do not lather any further then the ears, and take especial care not to get any soap in the mouth, eyes, ears, or nose. Rinse with plenty of warm water so that no soap suds or traces of shampoo are left in his coat. Lift the guinea pig out, onto a towel, and roll it around him, so that it looks like an Egyptian mummy. This covers his fur evenly on all sides, and makes him feel protected. Cuddle your guinea pig, stroke it, rub him gently, and talk to it comfortingly. This will put your guinea pig at ease.
Most guinea pigs love to be brushed after their bath, but some will sqeauk with the unfamiliar sensation. More often the not, you will not be hurting your guinea pig as you are brushing him. Brush with steady, even strokes that sopan the length of his body.
Finally, guinea pigs need to be paid much attention. They must be handled, stroked, and talked to, every day. This developes their sociable tendencies and affectionate nature. If you get to know your guinea pig well enough, it will feel comfortable enough to run towards you, purr, or sqeauk when it sees or hears you; it will fall asleep on your lap; it will take food from you; it won't be scared of you; it will recognize you; it will lick you, and, most importantly, develop a relationship with you.

Click For Replies (1)
  • Lindsey - 2014-10-04
    that was helpfull
Reply
Animal-World info on Common Ringtail Possum
Animal Story on Common Ringtail Possum
List Animal Stories on Common Ringtail Possum
More info at Animal-World
Louise - 2011-12-23
Ringtail Possums are not pets. They are wild animals and should be left to flourish in the wild. If you find a sick or injured possum please get it to a registered wildlife carer or vet asap as these animals need special care with an aim to release all animals. Please do the right thing by these animals and don't keep them confined in a cage, they should be free

Click For Replies (1)
  • Lola - 2012-12-10
     Ringtail possums are protected species in Australia, and it's illegal to interfere with them in any way whatsoever ie. no trapping, and no keeping, despite the fact they can be pests in your garden. They easily destroy any roses you keep, and have a strategy of destroying (and ultimately killing) one tree at a time. Like all marsupials, they have very small brains, and while they're good at what they do (climb), they are not intelligent animals like dogs and they can in no way be trained as pets. As for house-training, forget it - they just don't understand and will wee and drop constantly wherever they are (including on you). When picked up, they generally ignore you apart from scratching you with very sharp claws when handled. In summary, they do not make good pets whatsoever. They're like opossums, but a bit more primitive and certainly less intelligent than a rat or mouse. You can get a wildlife permit if you have a very good reason to keep one, but this is expensive and only given if the animal has no alternative - having one as a pet is almost unheard of. In summary, they are protected native animals, and should be left to their natural environments, which if you're lucky, may include your garden. They are social animals and MUST be kept as a family group together, which effectively means you can't have 'one' as a pet. Lastly, anyone from Belize who tells you they've got them is a scammer - this kind of third world possum scam is very common.
Reply
Animal-World info on Abyssinian Guinea Pig
Animal Story on Abyssinian Guinea Pig
List Animal Stories on Abyssinian Guinea Pig
More info at Animal-World
Lana - 2014-05-18
I have an Abyssinian female around 3 years old, her past owner's didn't treat her well. I have had her for a while now and think we have bonded. I would really like to train her to come when I call her name but I don't know how, any tips?:-)

Click For Replies (2)
  • Mariana Jimenez - 2014-06-19
    I live in LA and it's hard for me to find an Abyssinian guinea pig. Any ideas where I can possibly get one?
  • Catalina Davidoiu - 2014-10-02
    Hi, how do you know if she's a female? i have an abyssinian too, and it's 2 months old, and i don't know if its a female or a male. she/he has a rosette on the back that looks like a dress, like a tutu. So can you tell me? please? thanks!
Reply
Animal-World info on Southern Flying Squirrel
Animal Story on Southern Flying Squirrel
List Animal Stories on Southern Flying Squirrel
More info at Animal-World
Victoria - 2013-04-14
Hello, I found a baby flying squirrel at my fiance's parent's house yesterday. My fiance's mother informed me that the dog and cats had messed with it and he even got bitten on the leg. My fiance's dad also accidentally sucked him into the vacuum cleaner. The poor little guy was really scared and so he bit me which is understandable. I got a little fish aquarium to keep him in for the time being and I purchased food for a hamster which has nuts, corn, and dried fruits in it. I am not really sure what he needs to drink. He is about six weeks old. I have a very big cage that my old monkey lived in for him to live in. I don't want him to die. He has been through a lot already so I want to make sure that I am doing things correctly. Any tips??

Click For Replies (3)
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-04-14
    I would be concerned about broken bones or internal injuries, but it sounds like he may be okay as you didn't say if he's having any trouble getting around or acting funny. The comments from re-habbers and other folks above have some great info on what they drink and other baby foods! Good luck
  • wook - 2013-06-02
    go to www.thesquirrelboard.com and go to the forum and ask for tips.
  • Anonymous - 2014-09-25
    My sister and I raised 10 squirrels. We went to the vet and they gave us a bunch of of free syringes with little nipple attachments. We tried the small bottles from WalMart and (trust me on this one) did not work. We used WalMart kitten formula. Heat it luke warm. For the first times you have to carefully hold their tiny heads. Make SURE your thumb is barely pushing because they can kinda suck it out on there own. The nipple will look very long and hard but trust me it's fine this. Has worked on my 10 babies and on all of my cousin's squirrels. Once or twice and I promise they got the hang of it. 😉
Reply
Sandra Stephenson - 2012-05-20
I have a flying squirrel i think she is a little over a year old my daughter brought her home when she was just maybe 2 weeks old and she is doing great but i am concerned about her front teethe growing to long . Can they be trimmed or what do i do ? Also how long do they live in captivity ?

Click For Replies (5)
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-05-20
    In the wild it is said to be about 6 years and I would think it would be at least that in captivity. For the teeth - you can get a hard chew toy--- lava rock bird toy, dog bone, soup bone (boil it) usually knuckle bones at grocery store. Something hard for it to chew on and it will wear her teeth down. Vet can also probably sand them down but i don't think she will like it.
  • Rick - 2012-09-01
    My wife not only make sure our squirrel has shelled nuts to gnaw on like hazel nuts, brazil nuts, almonds and pecans, we also purchased flavored wood chews in the hamster section at the pet store. She seems to enjoy them and her teeth are doing well.
  • Kisha - 2012-12-04
    I have heard a calcium block is used for ones kept in captivity, as pets to wear down the teeth.
  • bryan - 2014-06-25
    I've done so much reading on these flying squirrels yet I can't find out how they are with children, new borns etc. Can you help me out?
  • Linda Jo Decker - 2014-09-25
    Me and my sister have raised 5 flying squirrels. We have one now. She is 5 which is longer than usual. We keep small sticks in there for her she enjoys chewing them. It gives her Something to do. They also need calcium so it is good to keep pieces of deer antler or sterilized bones. I hope I was helpful!! 😉
Reply
michelle705 - 2014-09-24
Help please!! I got two adult flying squirrels a couple months ago. A male and a female and I have had a really hard time bonding with them because the male is agressive! I'm wondering if I could let them out the cage for a little while to let them bond with me more, but I'm afraid I won't be able to catch them again.so my question is if I let them out will they eventually return to their cage!

Click For Replies (1)
  • Linda Jo Decker - 2014-09-25
    Me and my sister have raised 10 eastern grey squirrels and 5 flying squirrels.and my favorite ones where the flying squirrels. They are so cute and tiny!! The one we have now is 3 and we let her out every night. She runs around the room and climbs to the top of the door and glides to the bed. She usually is out about 30 mins. And runs back in her cage and sits there waiting to be fed. If I Were you I would go into a smaller room for the first few times. And I would let only one out at first. After they are used to their surroundings they can be together. Before,when we had 2 they were a lot more active. If you want to bond with the male I suggest you take them apart for how ever long you want. The male wouldn't be near as aggressive if there wasn't a female around. Mine of corse where raised as a baby.So... But what ever you do PLEASE enjoy your flying squirrels!! 😉
Reply
Animal-World info on Netherland Dwarf Rabbits
Animal Story on Netherland Dwarf Rabbits
List Animal Stories on Netherland Dwarf Rabbits
More info at Animal-World
patti russell - 2013-12-29
I just purchased a dwarf bunny, she is black and very soft to hold and it only took me 2 days to litter train her. I named her jasper and she knows her name.

Click For Replies (3)
  • Anonymous - 2014-02-07
    nice
  • sarah - 2014-02-26
    Mine took about that long to litter train. His name is Rusty, and he has been mine since he was born. I love him to bits and I don't know what I would do without him. Whenever I'm sad he gives my an encouraging lick on the nose. If anyone was thinking about getting a Netherland Dwarf, I definitely recommend it.
  • raeesa - 2014-09-21
    Hi, I just got my dwarf bunny thid morning. Im so excited but worried at the same time for his care, much like a parent. How did u litter train your bunny?
Reply
Animal-World info on Holland Lop Rabbits
Animal Story on Holland Lop Rabbits
List Animal Stories on Holland Lop Rabbits
More info at Animal-World
Anonymous - 2014-09-20
my holland lop is tan on the top and white on the bottom and she loves to eat and drink

Reply

About Animal-World

Animal-World offers animal pictures, videos, and animal information on all different types of pets and animals. Included are animals that are commonly kept as pets, exotic pets and wild animals. Check us out for information, education, and fun. We strive to aid in responsible pet ownership and an understanding of the importance of preserving and honoring our world and its inhabitants. Animal-World members and contributors are from all over the world. You too are invited to be an active participant in this community. Post your own personal pet stories, contribute pictures of your pets, and join the forums for pet and animal discussions.

Visit Animal-World