Animal Stories - Small Animal Pets


Animal-World info on Pet Mouse
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melody - 2013-11-04
I have some fancy mouse. I have babys but they are getting bigger. I want to get let them go or give them to someone, so if anyone wants some let me know they are free!

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  • Lynea - 2013-12-09
    Yes, please write to me. I would be interested in seeing some photos and learning about what is available. I have everything for them already here. I have had mice in the past and have done well with them.
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Animal-World info on Eastern Gray Squirrel
Animal Story on Eastern Gray Squirrel
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Catherine Garriga - 2013-12-07
Ooooh! Let me see! What is it? It’s so little. What is it? It’s so cold! What is it? Go get me a scrap of flannel from the sewing room. What is it? Get the brooder plugged in. What is it? We need a bottle of Pedialite and a can of puppy formula so we can rehydrate and get him fed. What is it? This, almost a conversation, was the heralding of the newest member of our family. While my daughter sped off to Wal-mart for the puppy formula and Pedialite, my up to now, ignored, grand daughter was answered. She was not only answered, she was allowed to see and touch the tiny creature. He was naked, pink, cold, blind and had a tail like a piece of string. It was a very young baby boy squirrel.

I held him and his scrap of flannel against my chest to warm until the brooder had gotten warm, then put him in to warm up until we could get him rehydrated. I had rounded up an assortment of small bottles and nipples we keep to feed orphaned puppies and kittens and whatever other creatures come along. As it turned out, he never used one. He was too small and weak and had to be fed with a 1ml syringe.

For the first couple hours we gave him only the Pedialite for hydration, then we started the formula. We added an extra spoon of water and about half a spoon of cream to increase the fat content. He had no trouble with the syringe, at all. This may have been due to great hunger. I don’t know. We had no idea how old he was, so we just had to wait until he opened his eyes, and count backwards. Squirrels open their eyes at 5 weeks. Puppies, kittens, large parrots and things I am familiar with all open their eyes, pretty much on schedule,so I had no reason to think he would not do the same. He was about a week and a half old when we got him. My daughter was in the back yard with the dogs, and one of the dogs wouldn’t come back, so she went to see what was so interesting, and he had found what she thought was a dead mouse. We had put out rat poison the week before, and did not want the dog to mess with it, so she ran back in the house to get the “grabber” to pick it up and throw it over the fence. When she picked it up, it moved and did not look right to her, so she brought it in for me to see. 

After he opened his eyes, it was only a few days until he was doing loop-de-loops in the brooder. It has a fan and switches and stuff in the top and we did not want him hurt, so we knew he had to be moved. A cage was selected and outfitted just for him. It had all the requirements a young squirrel would need. We put in manzanita limbs,a heating pad, a thick layer of towels, several small stuffed animals, a water dish and best of all, his most loved “thingy”. It was a Christmas stocking, we turned inside out and turned the fake fur cuff back over a ring ,about 1 inch wide,cut from a 2 liter soda bottle. The thin plastic was not very stiff, but it was enough to hold the stocking open wide enough for a door. He was crazy about it. You could go in, play games, have a snack, find treasure or just fall over and take a nap. Unlike myself, my daughter is a whiz on the computer and spent a couple hours a day looking up the things we should be doing for our baby. This was not my first squirrel, but she wanted to be sure we did it right. We knew it was time for him to start getting used to the taste of food, so we got small jars of baby food in flavors we thought a squirrel would like. We got applesauce, peaches, peas,sweet potatoes, etc. When we made his formula, we added about half a teaspoon of one of these. He ate them all, but he really loved the sweet potato. Every time he ate he got bathed off with a wash cloth. First, his hands and face were washed, then his head and back and right around to his belly. He always enjoyed this. For some reason, it soothed him. He groomed his tail himself. From the very first, we had decided not to name him , because we knew he had to be raised to live wild. I’m not sure ,exactly, when we lost this, but I think it must have been about the time he was opening his eyes, because he has been called Peep Eye all his life. Via the internet, we were told many things, among them was a warning to watch for diarrhea. He did not get it. He also, must have small pieces of dry dog food, a rodent block, and a piece of antler or sterilized bone. Our stores were all fresh out of antler so Peep Eye got bone. He did bite the dog food, and immediately dropped it. As far as I could tell, the bone was never bitten and the rodent block doesn’t have a scratch on it. He grew fast and his jumping and running out grew his cage in just a few weeks. It was time to move, again. 
We selected a cage a bit larger in perimeter and more than twice as tall. All his belongings were moved and a coconut shell with 3 holes in the side, hanging from a chain, and a pinata for birds, made from cane or raffia of some kind, were added. We also added a pink velour, printed with red hearts, hammock. This became his big boy bed immediately. We had been told he should have acorns and pinecones. All our acorns had been eaten and the pinecones were dry and open. We gave him a couple, anyway, and he was a bit puzzled. He studied them a minute, walked all around them and sniffed at them, then sat up and gave us a strange look. It was as if we were brain damaged and he was obliged to be kind to us. We started giving him more grown up food at this time. He got pieces of sweet potato,apple,string beans,kale, and whatever fresh produce was available. We strung cheerios on a string and made a big loop. They are great training food for large parrots, so why not squirrels? He played with them, wrestled and climbed them and they frenquently whipped his little squirrel behind, but eventually he got the best of them and actually ate a few and broke a few. He was introduced to the wonderous world of nuts and seeds shortly after this. Peanuts were not a problem, neither were sunflower seeds. At first, we cracked the harder shelled nuts, like walnuts, pecans, Brazil nuts, and filberts, just to give him a head start. The almonds he could handle himself. He proved to be a real southern gentleman, just like I had thought. Pecans were his favorites!! 

We were all smitten with him by this time, especially my daughter. She had taken over 90% of his care long before this time. She was totally enamored by him and the feeling was totally mutual. When she left the room, he hopped down the hall behind her. He was so adorable it’s hard to describe. He ran around jumping from chair to chair and person to person faster than your eyes could track him. He would nuzzle your cheek and play with your hair and perch on your shoulder and make a low, strange, snuffling kind of noise I can only describe as a sort of purring. He did not do this very often and it seemed to be a kind of contented noise. He was growing so fast and there was a lot for him to learn before he could make it on his own.

He had to have a nesting box to use until he could build his own, so we got busy and gathered up the wood needed for this little project. We made it the suggested size and put both an entrance and an exit door, just the way we knew he liked because he had eaten two in every basket and such we had given him. I have a large greeenwing macaw who has a very large wrought iron cage she only uses for sleeping. This leaves the cage empty all day, and it makes a wonderful play ground for a squirrel. We had been wondering exactly how a person would teach a squirrel to build a nest. We soon had an answer. We placed the nest box in the large iron cage, along with a bundle of nesting stuff and some fo his favorite toys, one of which,was a tiny stuffed dog. When we put him in the cage, he was a bit leery at first. After a minute or two curiosity got the better of him and he sneaked around behind the box, climbed up the bars and pounced on top of it. He froze. After a minute it had done nothing, so he decided it was safe and proceeded to examine it completely, inside and out. He went in and out both doors, then started hauling in the nesting material. Boy! Did we feel stupid, or what? He liked the nesting box and played in it all the time, but would not sleep in it.

We started putting him out side, on the porch during the day, in another larger cage we had. I know most people don’t have all these cages and a brooder just sitting around, but we have raised macaws, silkies,and Rhode Island reds for many years and do, and we chose to use them instead of the Tupper wear tubs recommended. We also felt that life with no playmates would be rather boring, so we chose to provide PeepEye with toys and as much entertainment as feasable. The first day he was outside, a young female came to visit. They rubbed noses and patted hands and she squeezed between the bars and he allowed her to share his food. She came to visit every day. After 3 days it was obvious that he wanted out, so we opened the cage. He ran off, but came back that night, freezing and starving. He came in and ate for hours, then went to sleep and slept like the dead. This happened twice and then he stayed gone overnight. Again, he was starved and frozen. This time he slept and ate alternately all night and the next day. He stayed gone all night, while we worried ourselves sick, and then it was over. He came home and was sitting on the porch rail, so my daughter went out to take him a pecan. He jumped on her shoulder and nuzzled her cheek a minute, then he jumped down and ran off into the trees. That was the last time any one touched him. Both PeepEye and his little girl friend and another slightly larger friend come everyday. They look for a treasure and we make sure there is always one to find.

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Animal-World info on Mini Rex Rabbits
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Amanda Deas - 2013-12-06
I got my mini rex, Miloh, at a flea market in July. I saw him in a cage with his littermates and fell in love with him. I didn't know anything about rabbits so I didn't ask the breeder the questions I should have...like how old he was and what breed. I'm fairly certain he was around 6 weeks old or younger when I got him because he was tiny. I thought he was a regular rex until I measured his ears and feet, and he's almost an adult now. He's very sweet (if a little bossy) and is my baby. :)

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Animal-World info on Holland Lop Rabbits
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Erm - 2013-12-05
I was wondering if you might be able to help me. My 3yr. old Holland lop has runny eyes. It has been going on for about a month and seems to have gotten worse. They are getting goopy. Plus looks like she is starting to lose some hair in the corner of her eyes. Is this normal due to the cold and the heater on? She is a house bunny. Is there something I can do to stop the runny eyes? Thank you for any help.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-10
    Runny eyes are a signal that a visit to a veterinarian is in order. Rabbits are generally healthy but can be prone to eye problems, often a bacterial infection or sometimes 'snuffles', which is a respiratory problem. For any eye problems, it is best to take it to a vet for diagnosis and treatment.
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Animal-World info on Netherland Dwarf Rabbits
Animal Story on Netherland Dwarf Rabbits
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Vanessa - 2013-11-26
Hi my name is Vanessa and I am looking to purchase a Netherland Dwarf rabbit as a Christmas gift for my son. The only problem is that I can't seem to find anyone that is selling this kind of rabbit. I am located in the Huntsville, Alabama area and I am very serious about this purchase. Please someone contact me if you are looking to sell a rabbit or know someone that is looking to sell. Thank You.

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Animal-World info on Coronet Guinea Pig
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Anonymous - 2010-04-28
Did you know, Guinea pigs do MUCH better with at least 1 friend Guinea Pig? I got my first the summer of 2009, I was her third owner, she was also very poorly treated, then, we got her a friend, American Guinea Pig, Loki. She was sooooo much happier, even for a crancy of piggy. When she passed, we had to get another one because Loki always had a friend, so we got a mixed breed, Abyssine and Teddy bear. I don't know if she is a teddy bear, she has long hair, but albino, so it's hard to tell.

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  • olaoye gabriel - 2013-11-21
    I need your magazine for guinea pigs and rabbits.
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Animal-World info on Eastern Gray Squirrel
Animal Story on Eastern Gray Squirrel
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Tonia - 2013-11-20
Hi, I just rescued a small squirrel from a cat outside. The baby was hiding under our bbq grill and the cat just kept trying to get at it. The mother took off, and I was hoping the mother would come back. This was yesterday, and I assume the Mother was teaching it how to search for food, when I saw them on my outside screen. Either that or the cat scared them both up the screen. That's when the mother ran off and the baby fell to the ground and the cat started after it. I pulled up the grill and then finally it kind of just came to me. I attempted to feed it some water with a dropper, it didn't want that. Last night I left it a little soft apple in a dish and when I woke it had it back in it's nest area and was 'nursing' on it. I have an inside cat and there's a few strays in our neighborhood, on the search for squirrels or anything I have noticed. I don't know what I should do with it, because it doesn't really seem active. It kind of just sleeps standing up in the corner, in a pet cage of course. Any suggestions?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-10
    For some feeding and rearing tips, read some of the great stories here, and also check out the Squirrel Board.

     
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Animal-World info on Pet Mouse
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johan setiabudi - 2013-11-18
at the first i got a couple of white mouse i really love and take care of them because they're so cute and nice not like others pets that make me upset many time. you can send an email to me if you need white mouse i have a lots of white mouse. some famouse universities in my city have ordered from me constantly for their research, my email is jose_5370842@yahoo.co.id

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Yuki - 2013-10-06
I recently brought home a pet mouse from petco and two weeks in she seems to only eat her millet snips and started to have what looks like diarrhea today :( I took out the snacks and changed her bedding. I'm seriously worried and have no idea what to do!

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-10-07
    It sounds like you are doing the right things! Give her no snacks for a while and see if that helps, and good thing you changed the bedding. Also, just make sure she's not in an area where drafts could be affecting her.
  • Katie - 2013-11-03
    My mouse has a swollen hip and I don't know what to do she is 1 year old and I changed her bedding today I am so worried for her!😓
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Animal-World info on American Red Squirrel
Animal Story on American Red Squirrel
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Amy - 2007-07-26
Hello,
I too have fallen in love with a red squirrel. We named her Gabbie. Her eyes were not opened when we found her. We feed her Esbilac until she weened herself off. We fed her through an eye dropper and she would just grab it and shove it in her mouth. I think she was about 3 months old and still taking her milk about twice a day. We then added mixed grain cereal for babies (Gerber). No plain rice. I was told it should not be given to them. Anyway, she lived inside with us for 2 months and knowing I would release her, I built an outside cage for her to stay in in the day. It was a 6x6 heavy gage wire cage with a door. We then would bring her in at night. We filled it with limbs for her to learn to eat on and climb. We let her stay in this cage for about 1 month and then inside at night. I noticed her natural instincts starting to kick in. I just felt that she was really wanting to climb trees and it just broke my heart to see her in a "zoo". I wanted so badly to keep her. My children and I cried for days. However, I put my selfish human tendencies aside and I let her run up a tree. She now lives in our woods with the other red squirrels. It was very very hard on us at first because we missed her so much. We missed her constant contact with us. However, I know she is so happy being free. I loved her enough to give her what she longed for, freedom. We now go to see her twice a day, call her name, and give her treats. She is soo beautiful jumping on limbs and being just what god intended for her to be, a squirrel.

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  • Peggy - 2013-10-25
    Hi Amy, I was happy to read in your story that you released Gabbie when she was ready. I have a permit through the MN DNR to take injured or orphaned wildlife, and over the past many years have raised and released hundreds of gray, reds, and flying squirrels. What concerns me when I read stories like some posted here, is that people try and help these orphans when they find them, but without the knowledge of what to do-they end up hurting more than helping. You should start to wean squirrels when they are 6 weeks old. Offer raw fruit(cut up) w/ plain yogurt, and make a baggie of this mix= Cheerios or Kix, plain granola (or the kind with almonds and dried bananas), dry puppy chow. As they get older add shelled sunflower seeds (unsalted), dried whole kernel corn, pine nuts, plain peanuts. They like raw veggies, especially corn on the cob, too. Provide deer antlers and milk bones bisquits to gnaw on to add calcium as you wean them off formula. Please realize as the squirrel ages, it needs to run around, search for and eat a variety food, and be around other squirrels. Spending life in a cage 20 hours a day is no life for a squirrel. Sometimes people have brought me orphans they have tried to care for 'just a couple of days' and often they are dehydrated, malnourished, have diarrhea from bad formulas, pneumonia, mange-lice-fleas,or traumatized from too much noise or handling. I especially wince when they say,'my children were taking care of them but after one died we decided to call the DNR, who referred us to you.' If you like caring for orphaned wildlife, contact your local Wildlife Rehabilitation Group, and start working on getting your permit. It's pretty much free, the group helps you get free supplies, and provides classes and free mentoring. For the sake of the animals, do it right or give them to somebody that can.
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