Animal Stories - Rose-haired Tarantula


Animal-World Information about: Rose-haired Tarantula

The Chilean Rose Tarantula has been an important spider for more than thirty years!
Latest Animal Stories
PF - 2011-09-28
Here's some information that I have learned while I bought my B. boehemei. I don't know if some of you feed mice to your Ts but if you do it's not a good thing. The breeder/biologist told me that they don't have the enzymes to digest the bones, cartilage and fur even if it's a pinkie. I have asked because I wanted to give my Ts a pinkie thinking that it was very nutritious for them. She also told me that even in the wild they don't eat small mammals or small birds, it could happen but in the 15 or 20 years that she has observed them in the wild, she hasn't seen one eat that type of food. Ts have a very slow metabolism and it's hard for them to digest mice or birds. Also, a high dosage of calcium can cause shedding problems. Also, an adult mouse can injure the T by nipping and clawing its legs or abodmen while it's beeing captured. Even injected with venom, mice can have enough strength to defend itself. Any predator can be gravely injured by its prey.

PF

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PF - 2011-09-10
Hello, today I took the cage outside with my G. rosea in her cage to take pictures, first for its colors and second to see if it's a male or female. The first few minutes it was calm and then it started to walk all over its cage. It became really active and it came out of its cage, of course. I had my hand so it wouldn't go on the ground; I didn't want to loose it. Since it became very active as if searching for something. I'm thinking that maybe it's a male. I have a web site on how to identify females from males but it's quite hard especially if its young. If somone can give me their e-mail adress, I can send some pictures and if you can tell me if its a male or female I would appreciate it. It's a really georgous animal, especially when watched in the natural light.

PF

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  • Clarice Brough - 2011-09-12
    Maybe you can share the pictures on the gallery here too. Especially once you know what is what. I'd love to see them, and actually see the difference between the male and female! Here's the upload page
  • PF - 2011-09-12
    Thank you! I didn't know how to up-load the pictures. I will do it as soon as I transfer the pictures to my laptop. The only thing, the picture that I took of her underside are not good since she's/he's clinging in the corner, I will try again when the weather is nicer outside.

    PF
  • PF - 2011-09-13
    Hello,

    I posted 6 picture of my G. rosea. The title of my pictures are all G. rosea. Also heres a web site on how to identifie if you arachnid is a female or male : http://www.birdspiders.com/faq_sex.php

    I don't have the experts eye to identify my Rosy but with time and observation I will be able to do it. For now I just read and observe.

    Have a nice day!
    P.F.
  • PF - 2011-09-13
    Hello, I posted 6 pictures of my G. rosea, I named all my pictures G. rosea. Here's a web site on how to identify the sex of you tarantula : http://www.birdspiders.com/faq_sex.php

    Have a nice day
    P.F.
  • Spiderbreeder - 2011-09-24
    Well, if the spider is mature, then the males sometimes have mating hooks on their front two legs, and generally have longer legs and live about 1/4 the time females live. The mature female is thicker than the male and have shorter legs.
  • PF - 2011-09-26
    Hello, I'm not sure if she or he's mature yet. I'm going to wait a couple of months to a year and then see if the pedipalps have the reproduction bulbs (forgot the exact term). I just hope it's a female...

    PF
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PF - 2011-09-14
Hello, I put up 6 pictures of my G. rosea and I named the all 6 pictures G. rosea. Also, here's a web site on how to identify the sex of your tarantula: http://www.birdspiders.com/faq_sex.php

Have a nice day!
PF

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  • PF - 2011-09-19
    Hello, no I don't have much experience in the arachnid world, I just started. If I seem experienced it's because I read a lot before buying any pet and I continue while I have it.

    Yes I intend on staying because even if litterature helps a lot, hands on experience shared by other people is precious information.

    Have a nice day!
    PF
  • Anonymous - 2011-09-22
    Wow, I've had Tyrone for 18 yrs and was told he was 1 when I got him from the pet store, in the mall. He at first would molt a couple of years apart, now it's about every 4 yrs or so. Right now I'm nervous because he's not responding. I'm hoping he's molting, but this one is quite different. He normally turns upside down, but has not as of yet. I hope he's ok. Glad to hear of other teenage rose hair tarantulas out there!
  • PF - 2011-09-26
    Hello, from what I have read males live only up to 5 or 6 years compared to females (15 to 20 years). I also read the record of the oldest rosy reached 30 years. Also, females will molt during it's life compared to males, males will shed until adulthood and then stop. Wow, she's an old girl at 18 years old, your relationship with her must be really good!

    I haven't had the chance yet to see a molt so I can't tell you my own experience. I'm actually a little nervous. I'm scared that she will be caught in her old exoskeleton even if I make sure that there's enough humidity. I have a felling that my new Brachypelma is close to molting.
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PF - 2011-09-09
Hello,

Last night I finally picked up my rosy after 2 weeks of having her and it went fine, so I decided to pick her up again tonight. After a few minutes she flicked her abdomen hairs and I put her back in her cage right away.

When she does this behavior when I handle her, should I worry that she will bite?

Will she get used to me? And will she, one day, enjoy comming out of her cage? I don't want her to become aggressive. I know I should not manipulate her too much, but I would like her to get use to me. Any suggestions?

PF

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  • PF - 2011-09-10
    Thank's for the info. I didn't have the word "tame" in my mind but more the expression "get used to me". You are right they are not creatures that like to be handled and in the future I will avoid manipulating it as less as possible. I can't imagine the bite of my rosy and I have been stung by a bee once when I was a child, but I don't remember how much it hurt. I have a parrot that bites really, really hard, so I imagine that my rosy hurts less...

    PF
  • branden martin - 2011-09-20
    I've never had trouble handling my rosy
  • Anonymous - 2011-09-22
    She and I are a lot more comfortable with each other. I'm not scared of her anymore and I see a difference in her character (less skittish). She even lets me rub her hairs on her legs. I don't completely touch the legs, just the tip of one or two hairs very very slowly. She's an amazing creature!

    PF
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PF - 2011-09-21
Hello,

I just bought, yesterday, a brachypelma boehmei and she is 1.5 inches long. She's extremely calm compared to her other 5 sisters. She eats very well, I gave her 1 cricket and she immediately jumped on it. Her name is Ms. T as in Mr. T. I bought her at Tarantula Canada. They have been studying tarantulas for the past 15 or 20 years; they gave me very good advice and they are extremely professionnal. Here's their website : http://www.tarantulacanada.ca/

I will post pictures of her soon.

PF

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-09-21
    H4y, thanks for the website - looks interesting.
  • Anonymous - 2011-09-22
    You are welcome.

    Hey, I see from your picture that you have a blue front or yellow front if I'm not mistaken. I have a 30 year old blue front myself, his name is Cesar. How old is yours? What's his or her name? For those who don't know what is a blue or yellow front, they are amazon parrots. Mine is extremely agressive and dosen't like men! I also have an african grey (age 10-12 Years), I've had her since the age of 6 months old. The pictures are on the web site under the name of Cesar and Poussi.
    Have a nice day!
    PF
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Scott - 2011-09-20
Hi,I'm just wondering if anyone can help me. I bought a rose hair for my wife almost 2 yrs ago and it has been a great pet. But recently she has started to act really weird. In the 2 yrs we have had her she has molted once and it was a big molt. She has a water dish that has cotton in half of it and she has moved most of the cotton out and around her cage. She will go to a corner and act like she wants to climb out and just stand in the corner and run up the glass for a long period of time. Her abdomen has gotten smaller. As far as i know,she still eats,just not as much as she was 2 weeks ago. Any help would be great.

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    Tiara - 2011-09-18
    Hello all,
    I have had my girl for 18 years. Love her dearly! She only molts about every 2 years or so now. Has anyone had a rose hair that long? Does anyone know what the general correlation between age and molting frequency is beyond, "the young molt more and the elderly molt infrequently.". I have been to sites that say they only live 4-6 years. Clearly that is not the case. Most sites shy away from giving any kind of range. I had 2 other roses that I got from someone. No idea how old they were or how long she had them, but one was little, comparatively speaking, and died within a year of having it. The larger one, bigger than my Tiara, died a few years after I had it. Just looking for any info anyone may have. Thanks!

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      Barbara - 2011-06-11
      I have had my tarantula for little over a year now and she has molted twice in a 6 month period. Is this something I need to be worried about? I feed her 3 large crickets once per week and lately either she won't eat or it will take her up to a week to eat them. Also, I put a 2 in bed of Hertz corn cob substrate in her enclosure. Is it appropriate? Or should I use soil or sand? I do have a cave for her to hide.

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      • Charlie Roche - 2011-06-11
        Recommended substrates are some of the following peat moss, potting soil, horticultural vermiculite, orchid bark, and coconut fiber bedding. Garden soil should be strictly off limits! Typical garden soil may have a heavy load of contaniments toxic to your little guy. Corn cob is not recommended. They burrow into the soil and corn cob can fall. Your little guy could potentially get hurt. Yes, they do burrow and the substrate should be at least 3 inches deep and moist but not wet or puddles. The motling is OK. A cave might be nice but plants or a piece of driftwood would be good. Do not use soil you dig up from outside and corn cob could be dangerous.
      • PF - 2011-09-08
        The corn cob that sge's talking about is sold in pet stores. The cob is shredded in very small pieces, like small pebbles. It's harmfull for parrots since it smells good an they tend to eat it, which can cause intestinal blockage. But for a Rosy, I don't think it should matter since they don't eat it. I read that a tarantula will hang on the wall of its enclosure if it dosen't like the substrate and will stay there until the substrate is replaced.

        PF
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      Cristina Rodriguez - 2011-09-03
      We purchased our Rose Hair named Tilly in Feb. She's awesome, doesn't mind being handled at all. This whole summer she's pretty much gone w.o eating, we were all worried she was gonna die and kept fussing over her. But thankfully we were just worrying too much and last night she finally molted! She looks so pretty! :)

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        Amy - 2011-09-01
        Toby-we spent some time talking about it and I agree with you, I guess I was starting to feel bad that the spider is always confined to her cage, I've only ever had the basic pets cats and dogs so I guess I'm more used to dealing with them. The more I read I'm realizing spiders are a whole different world. So I'm gonna leave him with the spider ordeal and I'll stick with what I'm used to:)

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