Animal Stories - Mombasa Baboon Spider


Animal-World Information about: Mombasa Baboon Spider

The Mombasa Golden Starburst Baboon Spider has a tough attitude, and a tough constitution!
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jix - 2010-05-02
Hiya, I saw my pet this morning with one leg missing. Does it grow back?

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  • Anonymous - 2010-07-08
    Next time it molts it should start growing back.
  • Ifrit - 2013-02-03
    The leg will not grow back, it's a spider not a reptile or starfish.
  • Allan - 2013-02-11
    It will grow back after a moult or two.
  • Anonymous - 2013-11-23
    It will not grow back. Even touching them during a molt can severely damage them for life.
  • Anonymous - 2013-12-22
    Yes, the leg will regenerate at the next moult. My 7 legged B.beohmei shed last week and now has her leg back.
  • CrossyRox - 2014-03-23
    Legs DEFINITELY grow back, it may take a couple of moults but it WILL return! Happened to a friend of mines Brazilian Black. Right as rain again after a couple of sheds and wasn't hindered at all in the mean time! :)
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Justin Stumbo - 2014-02-07
I have a juvenile otb and I've had he for two months now. She's been on a two cricket diet per week now but for some reason hasn't eaten for almost two weeks:/ I tried putting the cricket in her burrow thinking she'd eat but she ran out the other end. Not sure what's going on with her. Temperature seems to be right but the guy at the pet store said to keep it a little damp for moisture. Any help would be much appreciated. I just want the best for this little creature

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-08
    Sounds like it may be preparing for a molt. See molting info under the 'Diseases: Ailments/Treatments' section above.
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terry - 2008-08-29
I just had a night in hospital due to an orange baboon bite, no display, no warning just jumped and bit my index finger. Intense burning pain to finger followed by burning bruiselike feeling that progressed up to shoulder. Was put on oxygen and antibiotics. Pain eased after around 5 hours, finger was numb approx 12 hours during this. Heart rate and blood pressure went high, now approx 26 hrs later no pain to finger but there is to base of digit which showed bruising and am now getting random joint pain and cramps to legs arms and neck. Spider was not provoked in any way and I've kept various spiders for many years, this is my first time bite. Little knowledge around on reactions to bites so I thought I'd post this. I am male 51, 6ft, 18 stone, and never had any reaction to bee or wasp stings... Editor's Note: WOW! Thanks for sharing this important iformation! This knowledge can go a long way in helping other hobbyists be prepared and take preventative measures.

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  • went - 2010-07-23
    Okay, are you sure you didn't provoke it, but having said that I have been told that old world tarantula spiders, are nasty and aggressive, so they may attack without provocation.
  • Penny - 2010-12-06
    Old world tarantulas don't have urticating hair for defense which is one reason it is thought they are so aggressive. Mine would take the defensive position every time I fed her.
  • Simon - 2011-03-30
    I've learned from raising a mombasa that they are known to do that unfortunately it was my ex that found out the only thing I've done to keep being bitten from mine considering his attitude problem is to either talk gently to him or sing to him when I'm servicing his cage & make sure that I keep a close eye on him as well & it's bad that he did bite but I'm just glad that it was an adult & it only happened once.
  • DaniĆ«l - 2012-01-12
    Hey everyone, just thought I share this - was bitten by a Starburst Baboon Spider while camping at De Hoop this December. Scary experience and I can confirm the note of Terry above, the pain was severe and I experienced similar symptoms. I did not see the spider at all before the bite and must have frightened it accidently to evoke the attack. Thinking of getting one as a pet as after reading more about these special creatures I found them very interesting......
  • Cheryl Luhrs - 2013-11-17
    This is one T I find fascinating and a bit comical. He/she definately earns the  knickname (Orange Bitey Thing) that has been bestowed upon this sp. of Tarantula. I remember the 1st time I heard someone refer the OBT in this manner and it still brings a chuckle out of me. My T-hobby has grown into 26 spideys, most of them were purchased as spiderlings (or slings) and are all 'new world'. Their venom is much less signif. that the 'old world T's. These are fairly easy to breed and the females will actually care for their 'male' partner by sharing the food etc. until she has been bred.

    All T's are eye popping lil guys and even though she  colors up nicely, she'll let him and her 'guardians' have it every chance she's given.

    Incredibly interesting hobby but use your tong religiously to feed etc.  He/she is just waiting for the OBT change to nail ya.
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Ted MacRae - 2013-11-16
I just got an OBT - a little over 3' from tip of right front to tip of left back leg and stocky so I presume a still juvenile female. I have her in a 10G aquarium with 4-6' of shredded coconut husk for bedding and a Y-shaped cork round leading down into the bedding for a natural hide. She stays in my office, which is typical office heating during the winter and cooling during the summer. The lights are on when I am there and off when I am not. Should I add any supplemental lighting or heat? Perhaps a day/night light? Specific recommendations would be greatly appreciated. She is VERY skittish to vibration or touch but not approach; I am really looking forward to watching her over the next several years (hopefully).

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  • Ted MacRae - 2013-11-16
    Here is a photo of her.

  • Clarice Brough - 2013-11-17
    Wow, she's a real pretty little lady!
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-11-17
    It sounds like a good environment temperature-wise. I'm thinking the office temperature is so regulated itself, that it may not change significantly and so you may not need any black/red night lighting. What a fascinating creature you get to watch:)
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Alejandro - 2013-04-23
I got my juvenile baboon a week ago. She has molted less than a month ago and is currently in a temporary housing. She is a little more than an inch long, and spends most time in the bottom of the jar. I threw in there some sticks for her to climb onto. Looking for a proper housing. What would you suggest on size? I looked for some kind of a bottle housing so its tall and has room for some depth in the soil to burrow. I have not found yet what i want but will continue looking.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-04-23
    As adults they have up to about a 6' (15 cm) leg span, and will need at around a 5.5 gallon aquarium, or an enclosure that's about 12x8x8 inches (30x20x20 cm) in size.
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Codey Holloway - 2013-03-31
any tips on the housing?  like what cage size and should i get a lamp?  i live in reno nevada desert. its very dry here. hot days cold night. should a get a humidiphire?

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Logan Olson - 2012-04-30
Just got a Mombasa Baboon and set up her amazing enviroment in a 55 gal tank. She will be very happy here and sure enough a day or two after i bought her she has gone and started to molt. My other T did the same thing years ago as she grew up in a small cage and the moment she was able to stretch out she molted. Looking forward to this very aggressive T and watching her grow up for years to come.

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  • hankypanky56 - 2012-07-02
    Your post looks great except for the 55 gallon tank, maybe you meant 5 gallons that would be more reasonable.
  • h.s. oflaherty - 2012-12-04
    Just wanted to say I bought my baboon and set 'her' up in 5 gal. tank. The spider was not bigger than a half inch around. When I put her into the tank I thought I was ripped off as didn't see it. Could not find cricket small enought to feed her. Was at least two months before I saw her for first molt. She is 9 months old now and her body length (not legs) is 2 and one quarter inches long!! Very orange, very agressive when provoked (do that to see if she stands up to her rep. and she does. Her fangs are about 1/4 inch long! Let me know how yours is doing. They live a long time so we might talk a few times. Good luck.... steve
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Wade - 2012-09-10
Just brought a babboon home today. I've had many years of casual experience with tarantulas...but have only had one previous old world. What is the easiest way to maintain the correct temp & humidity during the winter?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2012-09-17
    Generally winter is a drier period, of course that depends on where you live. These tarantulas like a dry environment, more so than other species. Temperature is usually regulated with lighting, with red or black bulbs used at night.
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aimee - 2009-03-04
My friend has one named gloria and it's really surprising to read how aggresive they are. I don't know about you but it's the laziest pet in the house and hasn't displayed any aggresive behavior to the hundreds of people who've handled it in the 2-3 months he's had it. I hope it's not sick or anything.

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  • Marc - 2010-07-30
    It's like if you own a tiger. It might not be aggressive if it's been taught to be around humans, and it's well fed, but one day it might have fear or his instincts might get stronger and, pop, it will attack.
  • Simon - 2011-03-30
    So long as the tarantula is eating on a weekly basis & the colors & hair look vibrant & fuzzy it should be ok mine is very lazy unless it involves food or making someone back away because he does not like to be messed with, if you have any questions please let me know I have been raising & caring for tarantulas of all kinds for 21 years so please ask away I do not mind at all.
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Michael Sparks - 2008-11-26
Hey all, I also have a Mombasa Golden Starburst Baboon and I have seen her eat but she is acting rather strange atm. I have kept various different spiders before but don't know too much bout my "mombasa". She keeps sitting outside of her burrow and tucking her legs up into her belly as if she is scared or not well. Any ideas what I can do? or is this normal? plz contact me if you know thanx, my E-mail is, brain_freeze_band@hotmail.com
thanx
x

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  • Simon - 2011-03-30
    If it looks like she's been scratching then she's molting but she may also be not feeling well the only thing I can say is to keep a close eye on her & to make sure that she is eating & has good clean water & that her tank humidity should be between 50%-60% humidity & that her tank temp. should stay between 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit, if you have any questions please ask I have been raising & caring for tarantulas of all kinds for 21 years & I don't mind so please ask away.
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