Animal Stories - Ball Python


Animal-World Information about: Ball Python

The handsome, sweet tempered Ball Python is one of the most favored and adored pet snakes!
Latest Animal Stories
mel - 2013-04-23
I have owned 'China Girl' for @ 12 years. I recently relocated to the High Desert and am looking for other HAPPY snake owners in this area. I have a hard time finding feeder mice without paying a fortune at the pet stores. Don't care to raise the little boogers myself. I love my 5 ft 'little girl', she's absolutely beautiful, and quite the conversation starter. Anybody out there who might be able to help me out? Happy snake owner in Victorville CA.

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  • ieshia - 2014-09-09
    I want it but I live in georgia
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Lenny - 2008-04-29
I have a young ball python named Patch. Ball pythons are chubby snakes; short and fat and generally quite slow when moving, so they are not likely to scare someone who is afraid of snakes. They are incredibly strong creatures with over 77% of their entire bodies consisting of pure muscle, so they will squeeze very tightly and effortlessly to anything supporting them. Ball pythons often scare their new owners when they refuse to eat for months at a time. This is simply because they are sensitive creatures and they become shy and reclusive when introduced to a new situation. It may take your python a full year to become accustomed to your home, and so he will be quite reluctant to eat. Very seldom will a reptile eat when shedding, so you can speed up the shed by warm baths every couple of days until the snake finally gets rid of his skin. It is always better to feed several small prey items rather than one large one. I suggest offering a live pinky mouse every to every other day. If the snake eats it, he eats it. If not, it can wait a day or two. This is the best way for a snake to eat, as it does wonders for their digestive tract. Studies show that snakes fed this way can top fifty years or more, and even in some cases, outlive their owners! A larger snake can be fed a larger mouse, or more pinkies. Breeding colonies of mice is a great way to get hundreds of mice for under ten dollars, and to keep them for years to come. Ball pythons are extremely sensitive to drastic temperature change, and they can slowly freeze to death even at room temperature! Remember, your body makes heat on its own, but snakes need their environment to make heat for them. This is what "cold-blooded" really means. Have you ever noticed your snake crawling towards appliances, heaters, warm food, or even towards you? They can "see" warm places, and they like to be near them to regulate body temperature. A cold snake will quickly wander to the warmest place it sees to keep itself alive. That's why it's a good idea to turn on a small heater and put a towel next to it whenever your snake gets loose. You can check the towel every couple of hours to see if your buddy is sleeping underneath it. If you let a mouse crawl on the towel, your snake will also be attracted to the tasty smell.

SITE ADMIN: Alter the text as you see fit, post the parts that you like most if you need to make room. Feel free to leave my address on the page, as I enjoy helping inexperienced python owners in their times of need. Feel free to contact me at any time, I'd be more than happy to chat!

Lenny V. Lisbeck
Heavenly Hollow Herps
Leech Lake Area, MN

shiroisan-leonardo@hotmail.com

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  • Dezirae - 2010-10-03
    Hi, I have a baby ball python named Chico. He is a little over two months. I do handle him a lot and I found out that that does cause a refusal to eat with ball pythons. I usually take him with me when I go places. Is that unhealthy for him?
    The first time I fed him a fuzzy, he ate it. My local pet store did not have any live fuzzies so I had to buy a frozen one. I thawed it out and gave it to him but he will not eat it.
    Also, I feel like it's time for him to shed, but he isn't. I am worried his tank is not humid enough. Help?
  • Anonymous - 2014-06-03
    I have an under 6 months baby ball python named rex he loves everyone.
  • Alissa - 2014-07-15
    Hey does it know how to coil?
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Heather - 2014-07-15
Our ball python Jafar has never been aggressive until recently. Recently he has become increasingly aggressive. We have noticed that he seems to be tracking our movements more often and had decided to feed him more frequently but smaller rats. (He was eating a jumbo about every four to six weeks and now is eating a medium rat about every other week) He actually struck my husband's hand (didn't coil and immediately released) during a feeding session. This is something unusual for him. I was wondering if there is any illness or condition that might render Jafar more aggressive and if anyone has any tips or advice. We love our snake but are becoming afraid to take him out. Thanks

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    He could be trying to shed. Also cage aggression can develop because he sees you as his food source. When feeding, a Ball Python can exhibit aggression, and even after eating they can still be aggressive because they are still in the feeding mode. They do need to be held regularly to establish and maintain a good behavior. However one suggestion I read is to give him a few undisturbed days to 'get over it'. But before doing that, you should take him out and check him all over for any type of damage, and check the humidity and temperature levels of the enclosure. You may find the culprit being a cut or sore on his body, or an environmental change that's making him uncomfortable.
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Sandra - 2014-06-20
My 13 month old ball python's belly has begun to look concave with the sides curling in towards the center of the underbelly. Also she is stargazing and her last shed was difficult. We also noticed that her last bowel movement was extremely smelly. What does all this indicate about her health, and what should we do?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-06-27
    It sounds like he may be emaciated. It could be from underfeeding or he may have a parasite (worms). I recommend you take him to be checked out by a vet.
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Sandra - 2014-06-20
Our 13 month old ball python, Sue Ellen, has been very healthy. However, this month she had a hard time shedding (mostly from the head area) and I realize that she needs more humidity. Now I notice that her underbelly is getting concave at times, and edges curl in towards the center. She always eats well and seems otherwise healthy. What does this mean? Is it an indication of something that is wrong? She also had a bowel movement this week that smelled very rank, which has never happened before. She also seems to stare into space a lot more than she used to, instead of going into her hide where it is warm or crawling around. I took some photos and a short video, so perhaps you know if there is someone I could send it to who can tell if this is something wrong.

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Jacqueline - 2014-04-20
I recently took in a friends ball python they could no longer take care of, she said he hadn't eaten in 3 months so the day I got him I went to a reptile store. They gave me a feeder mouse but a few days passed and he refused to eat, it's been almost a month he has not shed or eaten. He hardly comes out of his rock so I checked on him, pulled him out and noticed his eyes are cloudy, what is this, what can I do?

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  • Callum - 2014-06-20
    Cloudy eyes normally indicate that the snake is coming into shed. Caution should be taken when handling snakes in shed because it's vision is minimal and this can cause stress and anxiety. In some cases cloudy eyes can be a sign of ill or abnormal health.
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Sandra - 2014-03-06
My ball python, Sue Ellen, is about 8 or 9 months old. She eats well, is active and appears very healthy. But a couple of weeks ago we noticed her left eye looked cloudy. We thought she may have scratched it in her habitat because she often stands on her tail trying to get out, then eventually falls back into her log and other rough items that could have scratched her eye. Now it even appears to be swelling and is much bigger than her good eye. Does this indicate an infection, or does it indicate that there is an eye cap stuck there that did not shed properly? I am very concerned about this and wonder what I should do.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-09
    It sounds to me like she may have scratched her eye, and it is infected.
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ngosfoundation - 2009-05-04
I am a full time breeder of baby ball pythons in this part of india.I breed morphs of the following categories; pastels, pastel jungles,caramels, albinos, piebalds, normals and other rare species like the platinum.My prices are moderate.If interested contact me for more information,all snakes are vet check with health papers up to date,snakes are captive breed and are defrost feeder and also have geckos in stock which range from eggs to adult, you mail me at (ngosfoundation at yahoo dot com)
thanks, contact for price list

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  • Areeb - 2010-08-14
    I would like to purchase ball pythons from you. I live in bangalore. Could you please let me know how much they would cost and how you could ship them to me. Thanks.
  • Michael - 2014-01-26
    I'd like to buy a ball python next year, something of a rare morph, how much? Message me through my email
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Robbin - 2013-12-27
I have a ball python that is under a year old. When she came to us she was eating live, I have been trying to get her to eat frozen and it's been very difficult. I've managed to get her to eat one in the last 4 months. She is a small snake but the other day I noticed she looks bloated, her head and the neck just behind her head is normal but then she goes large and I can't believe she is growing due to the fact she hasn't eaten anything.I was going to just go back to feeding her live I feel so bad she hasn't eaten. How long can one go without eating before they actually starve? And does anyone have any idea what could cause what looks to be bloating in her? Robbin Winn Powers is my Facebook if any one could offer any advice and could pm me on Facebook I'd be very thankful.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-04
    These snakes can go for about 6 months without eating, so that's not a big worry, but the bloating is a concern. She could be constipated, which can be very serious if not taken care of. Soaking her in warm water may help, but if she doesn't look better soon a trip to a veterinarian will be needed.
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Alexis King - 2013-11-17
I have a baby ball python his name is tilly. Last night my boyfriend was holding him, watching tv, and fell asleep. I was sitting on the chair and all of a sudden didnt see him. I leaned to see if he was over me and he wasnt. I guess he was under the chair. And the chair pinched about a little bit above his butt. We were in the vet for 3 hours last night, they said they would have to do xrays but it doesnt freel broke. I can afford the xrays so they gave us medicine to give him, has this happened to anyone else? Will he be okay? :(

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-10
    I hope your little guy will be okay, be sure to let us know how he does.
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