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Lenny - 2008-04-29
I have a young ball python named Patch. Ball pythons are chubby snakes; short and fat and generally quite slow when moving, so they are not likely to scare someone who is afraid of snakes. They are incredibly strong creatures with over 77% of their entire bodies consisting of pure muscle, so they will squeeze very tightly and effortlessly to anything supporting them. Ball pythons often scare their new owners when they refuse to eat for months at a time. This is simply because they are sensitive creatures and they become shy and reclusive when introduced to a new situation. It may take your python a full year to become accustomed to your home, and so he will be quite reluctant to eat. Very seldom will a reptile eat when shedding, so you can speed up the shed by warm baths every couple of days until the snake finally gets rid of his skin. It is always better to feed several small prey items rather than one large one. I suggest offering a live pinky mouse every to every other day. If the snake eats it, he eats it. If not, it can wait a day or two. This is the best way for a snake to eat, as it does wonders for their digestive tract. Studies show that snakes fed this way can top fifty years or more, and even in some cases, outlive their owners! A larger snake can be fed a larger mouse, or more pinkies. Breeding colonies of mice is a great way to get hundreds of mice for under ten dollars, and to keep them for years to come. Ball pythons are extremely sensitive to drastic temperature change, and they can slowly freeze to death even at room temperature! Remember, your body makes heat on its own, but snakes need their environment to make heat for them. This is what "cold-blooded" really means. Have you ever noticed your snake crawling towards appliances, heaters, warm food, or even towards you? They can "see" warm places, and they like to be near them to regulate body temperature. A cold snake will quickly wander to the warmest place it sees to keep itself alive. That's why it's a good idea to turn on a small heater and put a towel next to it whenever your snake gets loose. You can check the towel every couple of hours to see if your buddy is sleeping underneath it. If you let a mouse crawl on the towel, your snake will also be attracted to the tasty smell.

SITE ADMIN: Alter the text as you see fit, post the parts that you like most if you need to make room. Feel free to leave my address on the page, as I enjoy helping inexperienced python owners in their times of need. Feel free to contact me at any time, I'd be more than happy to chat!

Lenny V. Lisbeck
Heavenly Hollow Herps
Leech Lake Area, MN

shiroisan-leonardo@hotmail.com

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  • Dezirae - 2010-10-03
    Hi, I have a baby ball python named Chico. He is a little over two months. I do handle him a lot and I found out that that does cause a refusal to eat with ball pythons. I usually take him with me when I go places. Is that unhealthy for him?
    The first time I fed him a fuzzy, he ate it. My local pet store did not have any live fuzzies so I had to buy a frozen one. I thawed it out and gave it to him but he will not eat it.
    Also, I feel like it's time for him to shed, but he isn't. I am worried his tank is not humid enough. Help?
  • Anonymous - 2014-06-03
    I have an under 6 months baby ball python named rex he loves everyone.
  • Alissa - 2014-07-15
    Hey does it know how to coil?
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Heather - 2014-07-15
Our ball python Jafar has never been aggressive until recently. Recently he has become increasingly aggressive. We have noticed that he seems to be tracking our movements more often and had decided to feed him more frequently but smaller rats. (He was eating a jumbo about every four to six weeks and now is eating a medium rat about every other week) He actually struck my husband's hand (didn't coil and immediately released) during a feeding session. This is something unusual for him. I was wondering if there is any illness or condition that might render Jafar more aggressive and if anyone has any tips or advice. We love our snake but are becoming afraid to take him out. Thanks

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    He could be trying to shed. Also cage aggression can develop because he sees you as his food source. When feeding, a Ball Python can exhibit aggression, and even after eating they can still be aggressive because they are still in the feeding mode. They do need to be held regularly to establish and maintain a good behavior. However one suggestion I read is to give him a few undisturbed days to 'get over it'. But before doing that, you should take him out and check him all over for any type of damage, and check the humidity and temperature levels of the enclosure. You may find the culprit being a cut or sore on his body, or an environmental change that's making him uncomfortable.
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Animal-World info on Albino Ball Python
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balkrishna devre - 2014-07-02
My friend alex rescued an albino sand boa in Indian state Maharashtra. City bhusawal. We are required to study the snake but we don't do it. Because we have no more knowledge about the snake. Please tell me how to register that snake.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    Can you send us a picture? Register with Pet Talk through your facebook account and then you can attach a photo of the snake.
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Animal-World info on Ball Python
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Sandra - 2014-06-20
My 13 month old ball python's belly has begun to look concave with the sides curling in towards the center of the underbelly. Also she is stargazing and her last shed was difficult. We also noticed that her last bowel movement was extremely smelly. What does all this indicate about her health, and what should we do?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-06-27
    It sounds like he may be emaciated. It could be from underfeeding or he may have a parasite (worms). I recommend you take him to be checked out by a vet.
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Sandra - 2014-06-20
Our 13 month old ball python, Sue Ellen, has been very healthy. However, this month she had a hard time shedding (mostly from the head area) and I realize that she needs more humidity. Now I notice that her underbelly is getting concave at times, and edges curl in towards the center. She always eats well and seems otherwise healthy. What does this mean? Is it an indication of something that is wrong? She also had a bowel movement this week that smelled very rank, which has never happened before. She also seems to stare into space a lot more than she used to, instead of going into her hide where it is warm or crawling around. I took some photos and a short video, so perhaps you know if there is someone I could send it to who can tell if this is something wrong.

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Jacqueline - 2014-04-20
I recently took in a friends ball python they could no longer take care of, she said he hadn't eaten in 3 months so the day I got him I went to a reptile store. They gave me a feeder mouse but a few days passed and he refused to eat, it's been almost a month he has not shed or eaten. He hardly comes out of his rock so I checked on him, pulled him out and noticed his eyes are cloudy, what is this, what can I do?

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  • Callum - 2014-06-20
    Cloudy eyes normally indicate that the snake is coming into shed. Caution should be taken when handling snakes in shed because it's vision is minimal and this can cause stress and anxiety. In some cases cloudy eyes can be a sign of ill or abnormal health.
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Animal-World info on Colombian Boa Constrictor
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Boots - 2014-06-07
My RTB was very quickly moving towards our sleeper sofa's 'innerds'. Knowing he'd probably disappear in there close to forever - like an idiot I engaged in a tug of war w this 5-1/2' young adult 'strength-o-meter'. I, of course, lost. After finally getting him out by other methods, he seemed more still than usual, so I was concerned...is it possible to pull on a snake too hard and injure it? Please advise. Thanks.

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Animal-World info on Albino Corn Snake
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vanity - 2014-03-16
I just purchased a female albino corn snake last night. I popped her today to confirm it was in fact a female. I was scared to hurt her and I still am scared that she's gonna die because I popped her. She hides a lot. I've tried avoiding handling. How long should I wait before handling her? Should I just wait till after her first feeding?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-20
    It's generally suggested that you wait at least a week before handling a new corn snake, to give it time to acclimate to its new home.
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Animal-World info on Albino Ball Python
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mia exotic - 2014-03-16
Hi... I own a snake myself... but it's not a Ball Python. Mine is a Retic Python... Been keeping him since he was a baby (1 1/2 months old ) & now he is 11 months... and 6 feet long :)

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Animal-World info on Ball Python
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Sandra - 2014-03-06
My ball python, Sue Ellen, is about 8 or 9 months old. She eats well, is active and appears very healthy. But a couple of weeks ago we noticed her left eye looked cloudy. We thought she may have scratched it in her habitat because she often stands on her tail trying to get out, then eventually falls back into her log and other rough items that could have scratched her eye. Now it even appears to be swelling and is much bigger than her good eye. Does this indicate an infection, or does it indicate that there is an eye cap stuck there that did not shed properly? I am very concerned about this and wonder what I should do.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-09
    It sounds to me like she may have scratched her eye, and it is infected.
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