Animal Stories - Green Iguana


Animal-World Information about: Green Iguana

The Green Iguana is one of the most popular pet lizards, but it grows big... very big!
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Becca - 2011-04-29
First of all, Green Iguanas are not easy to care for. They require large, custom built enclosures, lighting, very high humidity (which is hard) and a very specialized diet of greens, fruits, and vegetables. A cage for an adult iguana should not be smaller than 5 feet High X 5 feet wide X 4 feet deep. Another thing to look at is where the closest vet that specializes in reptiles is located. Even if a vet says that they will see an iguana doesnt mean that they know what they are doing.
Second of all, they can be hard to handle. They have very very sharp claws that can tear your skin just by walking on you. You can clip or file them to make them easier to handle but they must be tame to do it. During breeding season, males especially can become very agressive and attack.
Don't get me wrong, if you are dedicated to them, they make great pets but they do take a LOT of work.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-04-30
    People do not realize how large these fellas get. I am amazed at how they feel.
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Theresa Tipp - 2011-02-27
I find your website very informative but one question I have is, my iguana is laying eggs and I want to know can I leave them in the sand and will they hatch?

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VYAS - 2011-02-09
I have seen a green iguana flying straight in the air from one tree from one side of a main road to another tree on the other side of the road, a distance of about 30 feet. It was incredible it looks like a small dinosaur and around his neck there was a spikes and during his travel it sounds like a small helicopter.

I wish to get more details.

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Emma - 2010-10-13
Hello, I have 2 rescued Black spiney tailed madagascan iguanas and have no idea what to feed them and so on, please help!

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Ina Solenberg - 2009-03-03
I want to thank you for this site. We just bought an Iguana an hour ago so ago. I am doing my research to keep it happy and healthy. He is a big one, more than I expected(about the length of my arm). So beautiful! I will be taking him to the vet tomorrow to give him a check up and learn anything else that I should know. Again I thank you for such a wealth of information!

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jorge - 2009-02-09
How many times should I feed my juvenile iguana

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billy - 2008-12-28
Iguanas are awesome! Mine is named beard!

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Mary - 2008-11-01
Very informative site! Keep up the good work! I just purchased a 4 foot female iguana we named "Dizzy Lizzy". She is sweet but came to us in a very small aquarium considering her size, so we built a new temporary enclosure that is 7 feet 7 inches tall, 39 inches wide and 21 inches deep. I know it's not quite the size she needs but it's beats what she has now and we will build her something much bigger just as soon as we get our home remodeling projects completed and figure out where the next enclosure will go. She is not my first large iggy but it has been sometime since I have had iggy's, so I am relearning all I can to make sure she has the best care we can give her. It's a new experience for my hubby & my 2 young sons.

Mary in Camden, MI.

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Cynthia Annett - 2008-09-24
This is hard to believe but we live next to a pond in Loveland, Ohio (Cincinnati suburb) and today just spotted a green iquana sitting on the rocks next to the pond. It is defintely not a lizard but an iguana because there are spines running down his/her back. I know he/she will die when it gets cold. Anyone have any ideas? Should I call the zoo? It is now Sept, 24th and it's supposed to get cold next week.

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Anonymous - 2008-08-10
You should never use heat rocks, they can cause serious burns for iguanas. Need to look up temps... UVB tubes 5.0, 8.0, 10.0, compacts can cause eye damage. Iguanas should NEVER be put in a 10 gallon tank.

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