Animal Stories - Reptiles - Amphibians


Animal-World info on Antilles Pink Toe Tarantula
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heather - 2014-03-14
My Acularia Versicolor (matinique) is pacing frantically and wasting away! No eating and constant walking and walking...any ideas? She's skinny as heck! No wrinkles in the abdomen yet, but I do have another female versicolor sling/adolescent enclosure nearby... what is the problem? Pacing and shrinking!

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-20
    It does sound like its nervous about something, it could be the other in close proximity, but I don't know for sure. However, they do loose weight quickly when they are nervous.
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Animal-World info on Leopard Tortoise
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Anonymous - 2008-10-05
Hi Doug,

I'm wondering where I can get the Vit. E for my tortoise?

-Thanks!

" If you want to really perk up your Tortoise, apply vitaman E on the entire Tortoise and rub in with your fingers. This keeps their shells beautiful and healthy. It also relieves any discomforts they are having from shedding of their skin. Doug Wolkow, Highlands Ranch, CO." - Doug Wolkow

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  • Patty - 2010-06-25
    Really don't rub any oil or waxy material onto your tortoise's shell! They need to have a clean surface to exchange heat with their environment. Do not paint them with polish/paint. Do not rub oils on them. Do not apply any oils, period. Vitamin E, do not use either. What do I need to do to get this through to you people?
  • Pam Lane - 2013-03-03
    Spend time researching please!
  • Dr. Ray - 2013-05-03
    Vitamin E is really good for tortoise shells....you don't use it all the time but it does not hurt tortoise heating issues. You do not paint tortoises either! Vitamin e and paint are two different things. Whoever said put vitamin e on shell is 100 percent correct..
  • mallorys12 - 2014-03-10
    As long as they have a heat lamp and and uv lamp that's all they need, and a good dust for their shells, should stay nice anyway.
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Animal-World info on Ball Python
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Sandra - 2014-03-06
My ball python, Sue Ellen, is about 8 or 9 months old. She eats well, is active and appears very healthy. But a couple of weeks ago we noticed her left eye looked cloudy. We thought she may have scratched it in her habitat because she often stands on her tail trying to get out, then eventually falls back into her log and other rough items that could have scratched her eye. Now it even appears to be swelling and is much bigger than her good eye. Does this indicate an infection, or does it indicate that there is an eye cap stuck there that did not shed properly? I am very concerned about this and wonder what I should do.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-09
    It sounds to me like she may have scratched her eye, and it is infected.
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Animal-World info on Goliath Bird-eating Spider
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Kourtney - 2013-02-28
I just got a Goliath bird eater. Ate the pet store she was beautiful and they said she was eating well that she needed to eat again in like two days. Well I offered her a little mode but she never took it. Then I found her completely submerged in her water dish and it was full of water. When she got out her legs aren't really working. Two look like they are stuck to her butt and its getting smaller. The people at the pet store said she might try to molt. I have other tarantula and none of them sat in their water bowls. It just freaking me out. I don't know if she's OK or not. Someone please help me.

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  • Jesse_hutch - 2013-10-31
    Your Birdeater may be having difficulty in shedding, particularly if the temperatures in the enclosure are not correct or if she has been out under recent stress after she has begun this process. Extreme changes in tempreature can deangerously increase stress levels so I would advise handling or irritating her, this process is a natural one and unfortunately there's not much you can do, my advice is to make sure the tempreature is correct and she has sufficient depth in her burrow, once done I would leave her to it, to minimise stress.
  • Mack Hodge - 2014-03-02
    I thought it strange my goliath did the same thing, staying in the water dish with water in it but it was trying to molt, it went through a perfect molt yesterday...
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Animal-World info on Mexican Red-kneed Tarantula
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mark bawden - 2014-01-03
hi i have a 10 month old chilean rose before she molted i could pick her up every day she would just stay there for hours but now she wont even put a leg on me she has never been aggressive to me never shown her fangs flick hairs some times what could this be can you help thank you

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-04
    I can't tell you why your tarantula tolerated handling more easily before the molt. However, tarantulas are a visual pet and don't like to be handled. They should be enjoyed by observation and handled rarely, only when necessary. The Chilean rose tarantulas are less aggressive than other species, but the flicking of hairs is an aggressive action and her way of indicating that she does not want to be handled.
  • Clark - 2014-02-17
    Females often become less tolerant after their maturing molt. They are also known to eat less. I've had females become down right aggressive after molting and some refuse food until after mating. Then they try to fatten up for reproduction. Remember, no tarantula NEEDS holding; it is we who want to hold them.
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Animal-World info on Sulcata Tortoise
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Lisa Woodward - 2012-09-09
I just bought a 90 lb Sulcata Tortoise. I have had her for 4 days and we are getting to know each other. She has an injury to the left side of her shell due to a heat lamp melting plastic on her. Apparently this happened many years ago. Is there anything I can use to treat this area to keep it healthy? I am noticing that red ants are attracted to it and I am concerned. Other than that, she seems happy and good appetite. Concerned Lisa

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  • Jeremy Roche - 2012-09-10
    Is the shell actually cracked?  I have seen sealants for shells if it is.  Give your local vet a call.
  • Renee Olive-Foster - 2014-01-28
    Hi wow sounds like a great new pet!! I heard Vets do seal the area with some type of surgical Glue, best to get it done asap to keep it from getting infected.. bless her heart! Best of luck..
  • Sandra Hildreth - 2014-02-16
    I also have a baby sucata. My dog found her when she was only 2 months old and the size of a 50 cent piece. She had a small cracked in her shell. I healed it with newsprint with pain men's and vita shell with calcium. It healed up great.
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Animal-World info on Mexican Red-kneed Tarantula
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Anonymous - 2014-02-12
hi, ever since my red knee was put into a 10 gal it hasn't been out of its hide like at all. it is about 3in long. could the tank be too big?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-12
    I doubt the tank size is the problem, I would check to make sure you have adequate substrate and humidity.
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Animal-World info on Mombasa Baboon Spider
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Justin Stumbo - 2014-02-07
I have a juvenile otb and I've had he for two months now. She's been on a two cricket diet per week now but for some reason hasn't eaten for almost two weeks:/ I tried putting the cricket in her burrow thinking she'd eat but she ran out the other end. Not sure what's going on with her. Temperature seems to be right but the guy at the pet store said to keep it a little damp for moisture. Any help would be much appreciated. I just want the best for this little creature

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-08
    Sounds like it may be preparing for a molt. See molting info under the 'Diseases: Ailments/Treatments' section above.
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Animal-World info on Jackson's Chameleon
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Kelsey Harvey - 2007-02-27
Hi,
I live in Hawaii where Jackson chameleons were accidently introduced in the 70s and they thrive here now. I have one 9 month old male chameleon and he lives in a 2 by 3 foot cage that I built for him out of mesh wire. In the morning, I spray him and his cage with a lot of hot water (which he loves), give him 3 crickets, and I hang his cage on a tree in an area that allows for areas of basking and shade in his cage. Then in the evening I hang him up higher so he can soak up the rest of the day's sun and I spray him once more. I leave him here overnight and he gets more water throughout the night as it usually rains every night here. I switch up his diet very often feeding him crickets for about 1 1/2 weeks then i will give him some silk worms or meal worms then go back to crickets. I gutload the insects with fresh fruits and vegetables and clean their enclosures and replace the food every other day to prevent molding. I do not use Repcal or any other powder to sprinkle on the insects because it is very easy for the chameleon to overdose on calcium or protein. I take him out very rarely, usually on weekends when I am home. I hang out outside and let him climb on a tree in my yard (keeping an eye on him of course). I have noticed that he is healthy and happy when his tail is tightly curled. When he is relaxing he is very green, he does not breath with his mouth open, and his skin is not loose. If I begin to notice that any of his normal behaviors are changing I will hike up a mountain where it is moist and perfectly suitable for a chameleon and let him go. Anyone who lives anywhere else should immediately take them to a vet (who actually knows something about chameleons) if your chameleon looks or acts ill. Hope this helps!


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  • Rich - 2014-01-17
    I moved to Hawaii 10/2014 and found out the Jacksons live here. Since then I have been hiking and looking for the little guys. I have a gopro on a long tripod and have several nikon lenses. I want to observe these wonderful creature in there enviorment. Can you email me if you know of where I can look for them. I also have read in the last two years there population has dwindled from the demands on them. Thanks so much in advance.
  • Noah - 2014-02-06
    U can find them around mililani mauka
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Animal-World info on Ball Python
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ngosfoundation - 2009-05-04
I am a full time breeder of baby ball pythons in this part of india.I breed morphs of the following categories; pastels, pastel jungles,caramels, albinos, piebalds, normals and other rare species like the platinum.My prices are moderate.If interested contact me for more information,all snakes are vet check with health papers up to date,snakes are captive breed and are defrost feeder and also have geckos in stock which range from eggs to adult, you mail me at (ngosfoundation at yahoo dot com)
thanks, contact for price list

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  • Areeb - 2010-08-14
    I would like to purchase ball pythons from you. I live in bangalore. Could you please let me know how much they would cost and how you could ship them to me. Thanks.
  • Michael - 2014-01-26
    I'd like to buy a ball python next year, something of a rare morph, how much? Message me through my email
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