Animal Stories - People Talking About Sharks and Rays


Animal-World info on California Stingray
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adam - 2010-06-09
I have a stingray and it's been fine and now it has stringing stuff coming off it. I didn't know if it was growing or just dying? Thanks for any info I can get.

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  • motasm - 2011-01-31
    Go to a pet DR. he may help.
  • Jed - 2011-07-12
    Hi Andrew, I hope this helps. I think the reason why he's eating your newly added chromis is because any new small fish you're putting in makes him think it's food. Or if not, he could be territorial. I think if the fish were there before the ray, it won't eat them.
  • rex12345 - 2012-04-12
    Its just growing so don't worry.
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Animal-World info on Nurse Shark
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Anonymous - 2007-02-25
It is now currently illegal to purchase, sell, or keep a nurse shark in captivity without a license issued from the federal government. Which means any nurse shark in captivity outside an endorsed aquarium or zoo is illegal.

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Animal-World info on Blue Spotted Stingray
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Bastiaan - 2010-02-12
To Brent,

Yes commercial trawling is a major problem but fishing for the aquarium trade is as well. The species that are being caught for the aquarium trade are for the most part not the same species that are being caught by trawlers (I went along with a trawler and did notice that some moray eels and a large puffer fish were caught) because they live around coral reefs where trawlers don't come. Instead diving fishermen come to coral reefs and catch the fish as was mentioned by poison or dynamite but when these methods are outlawed by breaking the corals and poking in holes leaving the reefs demolished as well. I am currently doing my thesis in Vietnam and inside the (extremely poorly enforced marine park) all the species that are interesting for the aquarium trade are either at extremely low levels or locally extinct. Fish such as angel fish. So don't act like its someone else's fault but realise it's everyone's fault. The aquarium trade is absolutely unsustainable with its current practices so if you want to have an aquarium (which I completely understand) at least try to buy fish that are not endangered and unlikely to become endangered. Also maybe consider contributing to some organizations that try to protect the coral reefs.

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  • whidbey0001 - 2010-05-07
    Aquarium Trade Unsustainable? I think there are a some species that cannot be sustained at current rates, as you say some rare fish and corals. Most of these creatures we really have no idea of how many of them there really are, so therefore how can anyone judge what is sustainable. I agree completely there are plenty of awful things in the aquarium trade, but same with the art trade and any other thing that can make someone money. However I'm sure that the aquarium trade is a small nothing compared to the crazy commercial fishing that is going on now days, And even tho some species are targeted by aquarium trade that aren't "Targeted" by commercial fishing, commercial fishing gets a heck of a lot of by-catch that they don't target, which includes a lot of corals, because the fish live around the coral reefs of course. I'm sure most fish species will outlive humans.
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Animal-World info on California Stingray
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Moni - 2011-07-30
I have had my stingray for about a week and he has started doing backflips all the time almost constantly unless it's feeding time or someone walks up to the tank. I've never seen him do that even when he was at the store for 3 weeks while I got my tank set up... Just wondering if anyone knows if it's a bad thing or not!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-07-30
    There are back flips and back flips. U-Tube there is a video of california stingray just haning out and he does go up side down and then around. I don't know if this is what you mean by a back flip. Here's the link- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1PtZRGBDG8
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Andrew - 2010-06-17
I have a california stingray and my tank was going well with the stingray, one clownfish, two gobies and one royal gramma. I then went out and bought three green chromis. The stingray then killed two of them so I bought more and started feeding him more (two 1'' long krill or pieces of clam or silversides once a day) though he then killed the 2 new ones I bought. The chromis are the same size of the clownfish and he hasn't bothered my larger chromis or my clownfish. Should I feed him even more?

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  • motasm - 2011-01-31
    Sorry I meant it won't need more so you won't over feed it so separate them when possible.
  • gibson - 2012-02-21
    I want to order one off the internet and I was just wondering how big is your tank?
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Animal-World info on Horned Shark
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Pavel - 2008-11-23
How do I treat heterodontus f. with parasites, like a copepodos? Do i use copper?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2012-02-16
    Horn sharks, like all species of sharks, are prone to parasites - with copepods being a regular. If there are only a few copepods, you can carefully remove them with tweezers. If there is a more intense infestation, they can be treated with freshwater or formalin dips. Formalin has been reported as successful at some aquariums. Organophosphate pesticides are also suggested by some, they are sold under various names including Masoten, Dylox, and Neguvon. But there are varying opinions both for and against treating with this pesticide.

    Do not treat with any medications containing copper compounds or dye solutions.

    Handling is perhaps the biggest cause of shark deaths and can be very hazardous to both the person and the shark. They often do poorly when treated, often due to handling. The sharks thrash around causing internal damage as well as skin damage. So be very careful when handling.

    Some tips to move your shark into a treatment tank are: use a 'soft' treatment tank like a styrofoam box, wear gloves, carefully scoop it into a large plastic bag, then carefully transfer it into the treatment tank.
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Animal-World info on California Stingray
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James George - 2011-04-05
I have a question. When I get back from Iraq I would love to have a stingray in my 100 gallon! But, I would like to know how big they get, how fast they grow, and how big of a tank do i need? I see that it says a 75 gall is fine but I have read and people say 75 and some say a 300 gall! I just want some good insight from people that have had these for a good bit! Please hit me back any time! Thankyou!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-04-05
    Attached is an article for you on the California Stingray which should give you the information you are asking about. It's hard to go to large on a fish tank (or a bird cage) so go for it. Have a safe flight back from Iraq and welcome home.
  • James George - 2011-08-10
    Just want to thank everyone for the info..I look very much forward to getting my first stingray when I,m home..Thank you again!
  • semper fidelis - 2011-10-05
    I have a california,cortez,round stingray in a 125g 6x18 x22x039;. They are hardy, eat and swim constantly also if you choose to sleep anywhere near the tank it will wake you up like a baby needing to be feed.They do though require absolute close to perfact tank water quality.Your aquarium system should be set up and cycled thouroly for 3-6monts.YOU have to test the water oftenly then adust to the out put of fish waste that the stingray will produce.I have a california ray that was a newborn and was fortunate to be raised with the highest regards to the welfare of this stingray.This fish continues to challange me and to help keep me in this hobby through the tough times .Much respect always remember what you want and go for it !
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Animal-World info on Blue Spotted Stingray
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chris - 2008-09-10
If you truly loved these animals you would not keep them in aquariums. 99% of all marine species can not be bred in captivity and are thus taken from the wild where populations are dwindling and local extinctions are becoming frequently common. Furthermore, the mass mortality rate of species collected is totally unsustainable. Many of the fish and invertebrates are caught using bleach or cyanide which dessimates the reef system and kills numerous other marine species during the collection process. Please think about the impacts your hobby had on the wider environment.

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  • Linda - 2010-10-25
    Not very many of these creatures have been taken from the wild. It is true that their population is dwindling, but you need to think outside the box a bit more. So research and know that we can love these animals and still let the public view them. Your comment is very uneducated and pointless.
  • derek - 2010-11-17
    I have a 5000 gallon reef tank with three 1000 gallon grow tanks for corals, and how i view this (what seems as a protest) is if i am using and putting in my hard earned money so people can have captive born fish or coral i think i am doing something for both the hobbyist and the protester. But see i don't do this for money or any other reason other than, i love the fish and corals so much, that i made it my life and my will to grow them. If anyone knows anything about this world of mine, would also know doing so i gain more fish and corals and in return put more back into the reefs than what one hobbyist could take from the reef.
  • FISH FISH - 2011-01-10
    99%? If you check FAO official stats you will see 55% of fish are aquacultured.
  • Steve - 2011-01-15
    Chris, many species for the aquarium hobby CAN be bred in captivity, including corals. Check out the Marine Aquarium Council's site. The MAC works with marine biologist and hobbyists. All of the dealers on the list (they are certified) sell tank raised animals, and the few animals that are taken out of the wild are done so in a sustainable manner. I will only do business with the dealers on the MAC list.
  • aelun - 2011-06-11
    YOU ARE DEFINETLY RIGHT100%
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Animal-World info on Cat Shark
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Anonymous - 2007-12-19
Mine is doing very well. I started him feeding from a stick with squid, he now competes very well for food with other tank mates. Be sure to have a fine substrate, no crushed coral. They develop septecemia from scatches on their belly secondary to the wrong substrate

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  • bob - 2011-10-05
    Hello fine sir,

    Where did you happen to buy your cat shark? If you could give me the name of local pet shop you bought it from that would be great!!!

    Talk to you soon good chap!

    Your Friend,
    Bob
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Animal-World info on Leopard Shark
Animal Story on Leopard Shark
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ken - 2009-07-09
i got 200 gallon tank is it ok for leopard shark

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  • bob - 2010-06-19
    Yes.
  • Jacob - 2011-09-29
    No, it would be iresponsible to put a shark in that, unless you plan to upsize to a pool size tank. I would advice you not to buy it and if were going to upsize wish you would wait. It would save you so much trouble and would allow the leopard shark which is beatiful and a good edition to the home aquarium to live long and healthy so my final answer is absolutely no not till you get a 400 plus gallon tank which would be at less the width of the full grown shark female not male and at least 3 times the length, have a good protein skimmer, a good filter (sump), monitor all the water paraments and keep them the lowest they can, and most importanly have a schedule like weekly or fortnightly water changes and add chemicals as required. Please please buy the largest and correct size that the pet shops and Internet has stated, and do all the research you can before you buy it. Too many buy them, not knowing what they're getting in to and be warned no one will take a 3 or even 2 foot shark even the large aquariums choose not to take them anymore which means you need to house them for there entire life. They are like your babies and you must be responsible when buying them.
  • Mike - 2011-09-30
    Diego Hey bro you can catch one easy fish off the jettys or in the bays with octopus or squid. You will need 30 lb test. Night time is best. Me and my daughter just caught three this week. They get like 6 feet long and 50lbs. For a while it will but I say more like 500 gal tank they need to swim all the time. good luck Diego
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