Animal Stories - Long-haired Chihuahua


Animal-World Information about: Long-haired Chihuahua

   The Long-haired Chihuahua is a classy little dog, full of personality and spunk.
Latest Animal Stories
Anonymous - 2013-08-05
Hello, I am not allowed to say my name because I am a kid and I LOVE my best friend's long haired chi. I REALLY want one and hers is SO adorable! I really want one, and I wanted an opinion on how some of you like your chi's. We live in New York, and it gets hot in the summer, and cold in the winter. We have installed heating and cooling, so I think we will be ok. I just wanted your idea of a chi and if you think we will be ok. We have a big living area and a lot of open space outside, (with no fence so a little worried) but, I go to school EVERY weekday and no one is home intil around 4:00. Will it be ok? Do you like your Chi? Thanks!

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-08-23
    If you really want a Chihuahua, and your parents are okay with it, I would say it would probably be fine! They do great as indoor dogs, and as long as you plan to take him/her outside after school every day to play and get exercise, your dog should be fine staying indoors while you are gone. If there is no fenced in area you won't want to take your dog outside without a leash until they are trained and you trust them to listen to you.
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Kim Wood - 2012-09-03
We adopted an approx. 5 year-old chihuahua-long haired mix from the shelter about 1-1/2 years ago. His name is Reese and we love him to death. We visited the shelter, adopted him and came back to pick him up a few days later after mandatory neutering. He has adapted well to our loving home and new environment. We suspect he was abused at some point by men as he is a little leary of men until he meets them. He is a mama's boy. Loves Daddy for the walks and playing, but sleeps with Mommy all of the time. He has some kind of allergy and we have spent $1,000.00's trying to get a grip on that problem. We feed him Nutro Natural Choice Grain Free Limited Ingredient Diet (Natural Venison Meal & Potato Formula) after many tries with other vet-recommended dry foods. We no longer use dryer sheets or fabric softener in our laundry and have tried all the expensive flee medications (now using Advantage) although we have not seen any flees on him. We now use oatmeal shampoo and have him bathed regularly. We are hoping this works. Next, if the constant itching problem persists we will try Natural Balance as recommended all over this site. He does, however, have one other problem that I have not seen addressed here and it is really an addiction for him because he never stops!!!!!! He suckles, or wubs (as we call it) on blankets and does this for hours on end! It doesn't bother us, but I am wondering if anyone out there knows why he does it??????????????

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  • Clarice Brough - 2012-09-17
    Wow, that's very curious. You are very dedicated to the little fellow, and that is really great, but you do have to wonder what's up with the suckles. As you've mentioned, he was in another home before yours... and maybe not all was as great as it is now for him. Also there's no way to know when he was pulled from his mother. So there could be a combination of things going on, learned coping behaviors for early traumas perhaps? Sounds like he's going to be fine with you though even if he does still have his quirks:)
  • Amanda - 2013-01-19
    Sounds like my chi. GiGi sucks on her thigh for hours at a time.... Strange but kind of cute :) If we try to stop her it is very upsetting to her. So we let her do it and clean her leg so it isn't moist. I think it comforts her and the habit developed as a lack of socialization in her previous home. She had fleas when we got her and has been on a nitro diet for 3 weeks. She is recovering from bad fleas and has missing patches of fur and scabs that I wish would just heal so she looks as cute as her personality. She is also learning to be house trained and have human interaction... Her first two years were not in a loving home, but we love her to death.
  • calvin - 2013-07-28
    My long hair chi itched constantly as a puppy...vet said dry skin partially because I had to bathe him every two weeks because of my house dust allergies....I was told about epi-soothe made by virbac by the vets groomer...it's for dogs,cats, and strangely enough horses (although you'd have to be rich to buy enough for a horse or even a lab).,..you lather it up and leave it on 5 to 10 minutes then rinse well...a friend who'd had to shave his yorky mix cause of hot spots found washing with this every week for a month then every 2-3 weeks has cured and controlled the hot spots...they also make a conditioner which I haven't had reason to try since this has worked so well.
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Jim - 2012-11-07
What's the best way to clip nails on a dog that....won't let you and/or hyper(without going to the vet)?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-07
    A groomer?  I don't know any other way except to place the pup in my lap and hold him still with my legs and just clip the toenails.  I don't try and do 20 toenails at one time - just a few here and there as he is calm and sorta 1/2 asleep in my lap. 
  • Jim - 2012-12-01
    Well I tried to clip his nails but he won't let me. I tried to hold his paw and he backs off. He almost bit me and I think he senses that he will get hurt. I tried talking to him and my wife did too. we tried giving him a treat but still NO WAY BUDDY! I pray for the groomer.
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-12-01
    Will he let you file them - all you really need to do is take the real points off so he doesn't scrath you when jumping up.  Walking on the sidewalk will even do it.
  • Toni - 2012-12-03
    It takes two for my Bonnie's claws to get clipped. The groomer does the work while I hold her paws so that she can just barely touch the table top. Doing that keeps her mind on getting her feet under her and takes her attention off the clippers, which the groomer uses very quickly. Then she clips the long bunny feet Bonnie gets in winter, big, fluffy snow shoes on her delicate little paws. She doesn't like having her bunny feet clipped any more than having her claws clipped.
  • Jim - 2012-12-04
    All IS good now. My wife took him over to her sisters place (walked the dog there...less than a half a mile). She clipped them. It took both of them but it got the job done. My wife said he pulled her all the way going there, so he knew where he wanted to go. She has 5 dogs, 4 long haired chihushuas (our dogs mother,father, and his brothers so he has one heck of a time when he goes there. :) OH, the device we tried to use was 'Pedi-Paws.'
  • Mary Goodwill - 2013-03-24
    This method works well for me...I wrap her in a small blanket all legs except the one I am clipping. It limits her squirming. If there is someone else around I have them hold her also which is a help.
  • Debbie - 2013-07-24
    I have had dogs of all sizes. Nail trimming can be a challenge. Telling you to start early in life is probably too late for some of you, but you can get a fabric muzzle that fits comfortably on them and do it to keep from getting bitten. The worst thing is after someone has accidentally cut into the quick. They have long memories. I know it sounds horrible, but I had a rescue Doberman that we had to give a sedative to do her nails. She was the best dog I could have ever had but just wouldn't let me do her nails and the vet was scared to do it without doing something. I play with the babies feet from the time they are born, massaging them with lotion and getting them used to the touch of a human hand on their feet. Then they don't mind as much. Don't cut them too short. I just cut them back far enough that they don't disfigure the way the feet touch the floor. My babies sleep on my bed. I do it right there a little at a time - a few here and there as needed - so they are always willing to let me do what I want to do. And it is best after a bath when the nails are soft.
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laurie - 2013-01-05
I love the feisty demeanor of this breed. They are very smart. Some are couchpotatoes, some Need lots of play time. They are very entertaining. Mine is long haired & often confused with Papillions. It took 2 years to housebreak him. He knew better but was stubborn. Thank you to the family who rescued the pups. I'm sickened by human behavior.

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  • Jim - 2013-06-11
    It took our dog about a month or two after we got him. At the time we got him he was 4 weeks old. He goes on his 'puppy pad' all the time. One thing.....sometimes he will miss but don't we all miss once in a while? He's very good at sleeping at night. he will go into his cage when he's tired(10-11pm) and won't wake up until 8:30am. My wife walks him twice a day and if he had his way he'd live outside(nice weather).
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Jim - 2012-11-21
What is the best way to giv our little one some Trifexis? I mean that stuff STINKS and these dogs have a smeller that will detect this 'stinky stuff.' We tried a little allpesauce, put some in his treat, and we resorted to actually.... I held him while my wife put some in some yogurt and forced it down/made him swollow it. I felt bad doing it but you would think they could make this stuff so a dog could take it. Any thoughts for next time?

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  • Jim - 2012-11-21
    DAG this stuff stinks the house. WHOA!!
  • Clarice Brough - 2012-11-21
    Heh... sounds like you guys had some fun:_  I've used hot dogs to bury the medication in for dogs, and that usually works because they will just gulp it down (no chewing for them!). Also, a technique I use when medicating dogs and cats... I open their mouth by gently inserting my finger on the far side of the mouth, just past the molars. Then I put the pill as far back in their throat as I can, where all they can really do is swallow. It's fast, effective, and over before they even know it happened! Then I give them lots of love and praise.
  • Jim - 2012-11-25
    :) #1 worse part....to put the stuff in his mouth so he swollows it. #2 worse part.....Trifexis STUNK THE HOUSE UP. This stuff stinks and our dog can smell it(no matter what we tried).
  • Toni - 2012-12-03
    A miracle has happened! We can get heartworm medication injected for a six month period of time and it is no more expensive than six months of Trifexis. I just got my dog, Bonnie, an injection and am so glad I no longer have to wrestle with her to get that stupid pill, which she hated, down her little throat.
  • Joon - 2012-12-07
    I usually break the Trifexis in half since the pill is kind of big for them to swallow, then coat it with cream cheese monthly for both of my dogs, long hair chi & miniature poodle. It works like a charm every time.
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-12-07
    I break it up a litle and then put it in a fairly good size piece of cheeses or a ball of cheeses whiz or piece of hot dog.
  • Jim - 2012-12-10
    We tried breaking it up and rolling it in cheese. It worked for one piece then he smelled the second piece of cheese and walked away. That's when my wife put it in some yogurt and (kinda) put it in his mouth. Got some on his coat by his ear and she washed him but didn't get it all. I took a pair of scissors and had to cut the piece off. Getting onto a different topic it seems our dog has a smooth coat but when it comes to the ear area it 'looks' kinda matted(it's not just looks that way). Seems the area 'feels' kinda damp and wondered if it had to do with his ear.
  • Nancy - 2012-12-13
    I break the Trifexis into several pieces and then put them into pieces of a Pill Pocket. My dog loves the Pill Pockets! Good luck!
  • Gerri - 2013-01-07
    Coat the pill with smooth peanut butter and your chi should gulp it down like mine does.
  • Jim - 2013-01-22
    'Should gulp it up?' You don't know our guy. He likes the peanut butter then when he smells the Trifexis he walks away. I feel bad forcing it down his throat but I tell him 'it's for your own good.'
  • Anonymous - 2013-01-27
    Try fat free American cheese. I have an 11 year old longhaired chi with an emlarged heart. He has to take several pills a day. We first tried just putting them down his throat - didn't work. Then we tried the pill pocket routine - worked for a few times and that was the end of that. He loves American cheese. We now wrap his pills (sometimes I have to cut them up if they are kind of big) in pieces of cheese. No problem, right down the gullett - I guess he thinks they are treats. You might try that avenue.
  • Jim - 2013-04-04
    NOTHING works for this guy. UNFORTUNATELY we have to resort to forcing down his mouth. Yeah just put some stuff that stinks the high heavens into some cheese and he won't know. YEA, RIGHT!!! After grinding it up in some yogurt, an hour afterwards he hacked that up. Have I stated that this junk stinks?
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Jim - 2012-12-22
Having this sweet dog is like another kid in the house. We have to 'spell' OUT, WALK, PLAY, FOOD, jeez I could swear he has learned our language better than someone using Rosetta Stone.

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  • Jim - 2012-12-30
    Funny thing is my wife calles him 'a punk' when he gets into something. 'Get outa there you little punk' then seeing him running out of the room SHE had left open.
  • Mary Goodwill - 2013-03-24
    That is so funny...just like my long haired. Sometimes it is like she even knows what I am thinking! I never mention going to the vet but when that day comes she hides when I say let's go BYE....usually she loves her rides in the car! These pets are smarter then we are!
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Michelle Logan - 2013-03-04
I have a longed haired chihuahua. His name's Fluffy. He's a fireball. He's so full of energy all day long. It's really difficult to train him. My mom has another dog. A toy puddle. Her name's Audi and she is very old. She is 16 years old. Fluffy's not 1 yet. But he still tries to play with her like she is a puppy. Fluffy does not like any of our neighbors and hates cars. He tries to chase them on our daily walks. I don't know how to calm him down.

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  • Jim - 2013-03-04
    Our dog goes berserk over the mail lady. When we have the windows open and she hears him she says 'HI KILLER!!'
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Jim - 2012-12-20
Another comment.......our dog(after been given a treat 'sometimes') will go and want to hide.bury it. It's only frustrating when he scratches on the carpet. You kinda feel for these animals because I guess it's instinct. This is the first time I have had a dog that does this. As a boy we grew up with Boxers and the 2 we had did not do this. Is there anything I can do indoors? Outside he does not dig, just munches on bunny turds, eats bark off of little limbs, loves dead leaves. OH and got him a KONG and he will not eat from his bowl ONLY from his KONG.

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  • Jeremy Roche - 2012-12-20
    How old and how long have you had the dog?
  • Jim - 2012-12-20
    He's 11mos. old, will be 1yr.old the beginning of Jan.
  • Jim - 2012-12-20
    We got him when he was 4 weeks old.
  • Jeremy Roche - 2012-12-20
    They are small and often nervous dogs.  He may have come from a place where he  was not comfortable and may have felt he had to hide his stuff to keep it.  With patience and love he will become comfortable and more then likely calm down.  Try putting something special in his bowl.
  • Jim - 2012-12-30
    We've had him since he was 4wks old.
  • Gerri - 2013-01-07
    My female chi started hiding things when she was 6 months old. I have had her since she was 8 weeks old. This must be a natural dog instinct because I have 3 cousins who also own chi's and their dogs also hide their toys, bones etc. My chi also scratches at her bedding like she is trying to dig. I have had her outside and she began digging a hole like a hound dog, but she is a full blooded registered chi. Must be normal behavior for her. I certainly won't be leaving her alone in the yard to dig holes.
  • lisa - 2013-02-18
    Last year I rescued a long haired chi mix who is about 5. She does the exact same things...no digging outside except when she finds delicious cat turds (she is a most effective scavenger hunter), loves clumps of dead leaves, digs a bit in the house before she lays down in her bed, and when I give her a big treat meant to occupy her with chewing she will pace around the house whining until she finds a satisfactory place to hide it, usually in the linen closet. My solution was to stop giving her such large chew treats. Now she only gets bite sized things which she eats right away. I felt too sorry for her when she seemed in distress looking for a hiding place.
  • Tony - 2013-02-20
    Well, I had a doggy, long hair chihuahua, that used to get everything under ground and was afraid of everybody. I took him over to the Psychologist and he advised me to take him over to the graveyard for few nights and to leave him there all night long by himself. Well, I did so but when he came back home we found out that something was killing the cats in the community. It was weird because the cats showed up dead with two holes on their necks and by the time we realized what was happening I fould out that I have been bit by the leg while I was sleeping. I had two holes on my right leg. Then one day I went back to my room and I found my long hair chihuahua sucking blood from a rabbit that I had in the room. The rabbit was already dead. Well, I decided to end the problem and what I did was to remove the two fangs and I tough him how to drink tomatoe juice. Now I have no problems with Draky.
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Odalys - 2013-02-26
I also have a long haired Chihuahua. she is blonde and white and they are smart dogs. She is very obedience and understand a lot of things you tell her. The thing I want to know is there something to make her hair grow because she got a few fleas and from scratching she has some bold spots and also sleeps with me. They are very protective.

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Anonymous - 2009-12-21
Our long-hair chihuahua is almost two years old and such a sweetheart. She gets along great with our relatives' small dogs and at home with our 13 year old cat. Its so cute to watch the cat and dog play tag around the house (although the chihuahua knows the cat is the alpha pet). She still has potty-training accidents during bad weather, but otherwise is very behaved. Unlike most of her breed, she rarely barks and rather lick people then bite/growl. Chihuahua's have a very bad rap for being yappy and ill-tempered dogs but not all of them act that way.

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  • Erika - 2010-03-23
    i have a 1 year old long haired chi and she is the sweetest dog. She also never ever barks and loves to lick people. I thought my Peanut ( that's her name cause she is only 3 lbs) only did that. As far as potty training goes, she is too little to go outside in the snow so I have placed a small pan with a piddle pad in it in the corner of my bathroom and she goes in there. She also goes outside when its nice out, but I found this to work great for chi's that are so small.
  • emily - 2010-05-17
    Is he cute?
  • Maryanne Porter - 2013-02-09
    I have 2 long hair chihuahuas and they are so wonderful. I was given the first one from my daughter and he was so shy and scared of everyone and everything. He was 2 now he is about 7 and so happy, he is awesome to watch run he looks so proud. He does still have a bit of an attitude, always afraid of others around his food but just growls and complains. My little girl is almost 3 and so different I had her from about 2 months. She is happy and very friendly but barks because the male does when someone comes around. But she always wants to greet people and get some attention. I love this breed they are so cute and stuck to me like glue.
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