Animal Stories - Zebra Finch


Animal-World Information about: Zebra Finch

    Zebra Finches are great birds for a beginner or any bird enthusiast! These attractive little creatures are hardy, inexpensive, active, and one of the easiest birds to keep and breed. They are long-lived, with a life span in captivity of about 12 years.
Latest Animal Stories
Sandra Jordan - 2014-11-19
what things can you use for nesting material

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-11-21
    You can find both string and cotton nesting materials at a pet shop.
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Tara - 2014-01-29
I have two finches, one is all white, with a very light tan pattern on the tail, and dark tear lines on it's face. The other is spotted dark tan and white, with no tear lines. I have not had them very long, no eggs. How can I tell if they are male or female? Neither one has orange cheeks.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-30
    If neither one has orange cheeks, than your Zebra Finches are both female.  Zebra Finches are very easy to sex - males have orange cheeks and the females don't. See the descriptions of the male and female above... under the 'description' section.
  • Diogo Ferreira - 2014-09-23
    Hi, That's not always the case, there are mutations where the female can have cheeks. Females can also have dark red beaks, colorful chests and chest stripes as the males. The only way to distinguish male from female are brown feathers on the side with the white spots.
  • Clarice Brough - 2014-09-26
    There are a number of mutations like the Fawn Cheek Zebra and the Black Cheek Zebra, but even so the orange cheeks are still a stubborn indication of a male. You can learn all about mutations on the eFinch website.
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Colin - 2014-07-18
A male Zebra finch has started to feed in my back garden, is it likely to survive in the wild.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    It could, finches are very adaptable. However, if the weather is extremely cold (freezing) in your area during the winter, it may not.
  • ALICE - 2014-07-23
    MY MALE ZEBRA FINCH GOT OUT THE WINDOW AND I AM HEART BROKEN BECAUSE I AM AFRAID IT WILL NOT SURVIVE IN THE WILD.
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abdul rafhay - 2014-02-25
I have a pure white pair of finches. The female laid 3 eggs and began to incubate but stopped incubating after a week. The pair sits outside the nest rather than either of them sitting on the eggs. What is the problem with them? What should I do?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-25
    There's a few reasons why zebra finches won't sit on eggs. The first is because they are 'duds', and the parents will know if they are. Another is if you actually have two females, where one is laying eggs and the other 'acting' male, and in this case the eggs will be infertile. And another reason is simply that some times the parents don’t even know enough to sit on the eggs yet, so they won’t. Usually that happens with the first clutch or two, then they begin to get better. But not always, there are occasions where the parents never get the hang of it, so in that case the eggs have to be incubated by the keeper.
  • Lydia Ottinger - 2014-04-08
    I have a male and female zebra finch, they laid 5 eggs, they have been good about sitting on them but today they both were out for awhile, is that normal?
  • Melissa Reid - 2014-08-20
    My zebra finches incubated 4 eggs for 10 days, stopped for 3, (mated again 2 days after they stopped incubating), and today, 4 days after they stopped, they've started incubation again. Two are dark, two are yellow. Maybe she'll lay more? Or maybe incubation will resume? I don't know how long eggs can go unattended before they die.
  • Clarice Brough - 2014-08-20
    The incubation of Zebra Finches is actually more complicated than one would think. Usually the parents handle all the aspects of egg laying and hatching, but they don't always handle it well. Here's a site on Eggs by the Finch Information Center  that talks about the process and many of the challenges that can come up:
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missy b - 2006-08-06
my mom has two of these sweet little birds, that she takes outside and hangs in a tree every day. The birds love it and other birds have even come to visit them. One day when she brought them in at the end of the day we noticed that the male bird was missing! We were very upset and looked every where for him, not expecting to find him. The next morning while sitting on the deck we hear the little bird calling for his mate, and sure enough there he was sitting in a tree looking very sad. She brought his cage outside and he flew over to it and she carried them back in the house! We never did find out how he got out, or where he spent the night! We all wish that little LB, "little bird", could talk!

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  • tercia cronje - 2014-08-10
    I note your post was in 2006 already but so sadly reminds me of what happened to my little zebra finch as I hanged them on the tree and a Jan Fiskaal got hold of her through the bars of the cage. So please be very carefull when you hang your little birds on trees outside
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Tami Shallis - 2014-08-05
I have 4 finches, two male and two female. One set very aggressive, had to separate them from the other ones. Now they have laid 5 eggs, all have hatched.
Had to remove male,was picking on mother and babies. They are now about 3 weeks old. Can I leave the mother with them after they are weened? Do I remove the nest when they can take care of themselves?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-08-05
    Zebra Finch babies will be ready to leave their mother at about 4-6 weeks of age. At 6 weeks it's best to remove the young birds to their own cage.
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alimalik - 2014-02-27
I have two pair zebra finch they are not laying egg. I provide nest boxes and nest material, finch are boxes covered with nest material, meeting well, but not laying egg

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Moiz Ur Rehman - 2013-08-17
My 3 zebra finche pairs are laying eggs but not incubating them. 2 of them are laying eggs inside the nest box without making nests, however nesting material is provided to them... while the 3rd pair took their time to do the proper nesting and then the female laid 4 eggs then they stopped entering in the nest and started sitting over the nest rather than inside of it... 

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  • abdur rafay awan - 2014-02-25
    My pure white finch pair is doing the same. The female laid 3 eggs and began to incubate them but stopped incubating after a week. The pair sits outside the nest. Tell me the reason if you find out.
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Jean Susie Martin - 2014-01-14
We have two zebra finches and they have laid 1-2 eggs but we don't know which is the female. They both fight over the nest. They are both white chested but one has a black strip across the chest going from left to right. Could someone please tell me which is which.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-16
    Zebra Finches are very easy to sex because the males have orange cheeks and the females don't. See the descriptions of the male and female above... under the 'description' section.
  • Jean Susie Martin - 2014-01-16
    Both of our finches have orange beaks. They can't both be females if one just laid eggs.
  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-16
    Both sexes have orange beaks, but males usually have brighter beaks. When sexing them, look for differences in is the feather color of the cheeks. Males have orange cheek patches and females have no cheek patches.
  • Aj Tyne - 2014-01-22
    Even if they are both females they can still lay eggs -- the eggs will not be fertilized and will not hatch. So perhaps you have two females. If they are fighting over the nest, it might help (I'm not sure) to provide a second nest so each one has a nest to sit on.

    As the others said, both male and female will have orange beaks. The male will also have orange cheek patches on the sides of his face -- these may be bright orange or pale orange but females will not have them.
  • Aj Tyne - 2014-01-22
    They can both be females and still lay eggs. The eggs will not be fertilized and will not hatch into baby birds, but the females will each still lay the eggs. If they are fighting over the nest, it may help to give them each a nest so they can each tend to their own eggs. The males and the females have orange beaks. But the males only have orange patches or spots on the sides of their faces. In some males the orange may be paler and in others very bright, but only males will have the spots on the sides of the face.
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Brenda Clark - 2013-12-22
I am hand feeding 4 Zebra Finch babies and it looks like their crop is on their back, they are feathered, but after feeding they look hunch backed. Is this okay??

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-26
    That sounds very odd. The bird's crop, its food storage sack, is on the side of its neck.
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