Animal Stories - Spice Finch


Animal-World Information about: Spice Finch

   Spice Finches, also called the Nutmeg Mannikins, are excellent for the beginner. Besides being gentle and hardy, they are inexpensive and adjust easily to cage or aviary life. They are easy to keep and will live for many years.
Latest Animal Stories
Hassan - 2007-07-02
its a nice site who help us in many ways. i have spice, silver bill, red strawberry, zebra finch, silverbill and spice finch. In pakistan there are a lot of house sparrows. I have two, a male and one was flying but they are still not nestling. i have zebra, spice finch, and silver bill with them.

Reply
Rody Davis Jr. - 2006-10-26
I have 24 birds, and most of them are finches. this was just the perfect site for me. This website really helps me in training my birds, feeding, and breeding my birds. I'm probably going to visit this website often. I just love it!

Reply
Kathy Pratt - 2006-09-30
Right now I'm looking out my window and watching 12-15 Nutmeg Mannikins feed from my feeder. They've been here the last three years and are breeding. Each year there are more and more. There are several juveniles that are just starting to turn the darker color on top and get their striped feathers underneath. They're adorable little birds. They arrive in a large flock to feed in the mornig and again in the afternoon and early evening. I live in Fullerton, California.

Reply
Darwin W. McMillen - 2005-01-07
My wife and I have observed a small flock of Spice mannikin Finches in our yard in northern Orange County, Fullerton, California. This the second year they have passed through here. We assume they are passing through because we did not see them all year.
Darwin & Ann McMillen

Reply
Eduardo Rodriguez - 2004-12-10
Hello:

In the southern part of the island of Puerto Rico, in the city of Ponce were I live; there are flocks of the spice bird. We can see it
in the urban area, also picking the seeds left by the pet birds.
They eat the seed of the called "Hierba de Guinea", which is a grass
originally from Guinea in Africa; brought by the spaniards to feed
cattle.

Eduardo Rodriguez
Ponce, Puerto Rico

Reply
Paul Burnett - 2004-08-07
I found a flock of wild Nutmeg Mannikins feeding in a brushy area near a 7-acre lake in southern San Jose, California (behind 5750 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, 95118) on Friday, August 6, 2004, about lunchtime.

(There have been flocks established in the area since 1998 - see http://home.att.net/~redknot/almadenbirdlist.htm, bottom of page.)

Paul Burnett
pburnett@valleywater.org

Reply