Animal Stories - Pintail Whydah


Animal-World Information about: Pintail Whydah

   These are fine birds to enjoy for their antics and the splendid breeding plumage of the male. The Pintail Whydah is one of the most common forms of Whydah available.
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Dennis Buss - 2014-03-23
We have a pin tailed whydah Male in our garden. He is extremely aggressive towards all the other garden and wild birds. We had such a lot of birds in the garden they have all disappeared since his arrival at the end of December 2013, he chases them all away, what can we do to stop him chasing all the birds away? He is such a nuisance, I actually would love to see the last of him.

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Anonymous - 2013-12-20
Hi I live on durban south africa. A pintail arrived in my yard 2 weeks ago and what fun we have watching him... he bomb dives all the birds who come to my bird feeder... haven't seen a female around...

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ghasan - 2013-10-06
I caught today two pintail whydahs one male and one female. I have 2 Budgies so I saw them come eat the food up from my budgies so thought its someone's finch that flew away but thanks to this website I know wht I have. Thanks guys!

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clive heldzingen - 2013-09-25
I have 2 feeders in my garden. The black and white whydah chases all the other finches away. how do I solve the problem. I try to chase the whydah away but this doesn't work

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Gina - 2013-08-14
First, thank you for your site... I have a male and female Pintail, Tuxedo and Chickie, Tuxedo is in full breeding plumage. My questions, when Tuxedo drops his tail feathers, will he still be so busy flying around? The other is Chickie seems to display the same flight dance, but only with the other finches not Tuxedo? What is this about? Thank you for any help, they really do liven up the place.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-08-22
    My guess is that he won't change his flying behavior too much. I'm not sure why they would not dance with each other, but it is almost impossible to get these guys to actually breed in captivity! They need to be exposed to other birds in the wild because by nature they lay their eggs in other birds nests and don't raise their own young!
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Tommyr - 2013-06-27
A male has taken up residence in our back yard over the last several days. We have never seen one of these before so it was very exciting to see him. He fits right in with the other finches at the bird feeder and seems quite content. (Lake Forest, CA)

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  • Wendy - 2013-07-22
    I had a male pin-tailed whydah in my backyard in northwest Fullerton this morning. This was the first time I've ever seen one, and I've lived here for 23 years. He was eating birdseed on the ground along with the finches and mourning doves. I was thrilled to see it this morning.
  • birdwatcher - 2013-08-04
    I saw him this evening in the sunny hills area of Fullerton.
  • Tommyr - 2013-08-09
    The male continues to guard his domain and has now assembled a 'harem' of at least two female whydahs. He performs his energetic display often and each female seems very impressed as they flutter and hop as he dances mid-air before them. I am still amazed at his enormous energy level. He swoops and chases off all intruders except other finches, and impresses his lady friends endlessly. His territory has now grown to include the front yard and neighbors' yards.
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Tommyr - 2013-07-08
The male has found a mate! He's been displaying and making a variety of new sounds, plus has become very territorial. He's even physically chased away several mourning doves, humming birds, and mocking birds. His mid-air dances are amazing feats of acrobatics and stamina. Where does he get that energy?!

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Nancy cardin - 2013-06-07
Last year we had a male and female wydah. they disappeared in nov. 2012. now, We have a small male wydah in our yard daily for the past 2 weeks. So thrilling. he must be a teenager due to his size. We live in in the eastbluff area of newport beach, ca.

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Jane - 2008-09-14
Seen last week, for the first time, one male Pintail Whydah and two females at my backyard feeding station. I'm in North Tustin, California. I guess these birds, along with Nutmeg Mannikins and Red-crowned Amazons, have successfully colonized Orange County.

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  • Barbara - 2013-06-02
    We also live in North Tustin and have had a pintailed whydah in our backyard for several summers. He just reappeared two days ago (May 31) just when I thought he wouldn't be back this year. Today, much to our surprise, there were two of them. Lovely little aggressive birds that are fun to watch. Do you still have visits from the pintailed whydah? Barbara
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Don - 2013-05-15
Just spotted the pin tailed Whyda in my back yard in La Habra Heights, CA (Southern CA). As soon as I saw it I knew it was not in my backyard bird book! Searched the net and found out what it was. I am guessing it escaped a sanctuary or someone had it as s pet.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-05-15
    Yeah, not the typical backyard bird in your area huh? Glad you could ID it and hope you can locate its place of escape:)
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