Animal Stories - People Talking About Types of Finches


Animal-World info on Zebra Finch
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Cookiemonster - 2013-12-02
I love birds.

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Debbie Tarvin - 2006-09-03
The Story of my Little Peg:
I work at an animal hospital and one day a pet store brought in a little female Zebra Finch with an infected leg band. They had waited too long and the leg was dying and required amputation. The pet store did not want to pay and asked the vet to euthanize her. The vet refused and stated that the finch could live with 1 leg. The pet store said that they could not sell a one legged bird so keep her and do whatever you want with her. I took her home and named her "Peg". A few months later I was buying food for her at a different pet store and was asked what kind of bird I had. I told them and they asked me to adopt another Zebra Finch whose wing was defective and had difficulty flying. I said yes and brought him home. He and Peg were so cute together and they hopped everywhere they went so, I name them Peg and Jimmy Hopper. They now have 2 chicks who are 3 weeks old and Peg and Jimmy are totally in love. Peg has a good life now with a new husband and two little ones that are perfectly healthy.

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  • Loraine McWhorter - 2013-11-19
    This is so sweet. Bless you for finding the perfect pair.
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Loraine McWhorter - 2013-11-19
Started with 4 zebra finches about a year ago. They were given to me by an old woman who could not care for them properly. One died within a week. I kept the cage clean and give fresh water, seed, millet spray, hard boiled mashed egg, fresh spinach every day. I add whatever I have on hand like broccoli, apple, zucchini. I put nests and material in the cage. I now have 18-24 finches! Because they are messy to keep inside we acclimated them and moved them onto our covered deck They have a 3x6 cage 24 wide and we are building another cage! It will be 8 foot tall and 8x10 wide and long. We love them and don't want to give or sell any of them but how many will I be able to keep in the new cage?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-10
    They can be rather quarrelsome so it's hard to predict how many birds will get along with each other. They are best kept as a single pair in a small cage. Two pairs in a cage can cause a problem, as can odd numbers of 3-5 per enclosure.

    Several pairs can be kept in a very large enclosure but they will pluck each other if they are overcrowded. As a general rule, 3-4 square feet of floor space is required per pair of finches. If plucking starts to occure, some will need to be removed.
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Kathy Daly - 2013-10-29
I purchased three zebra finch birds a few days ago. I didn't know much about them but learned a lot from your site. I have noticed that 2 of the birds stick together while the one single one sleeps by itself. Should I remove one of them or will they be okay together. I bought all three because that's all there were and I didn't want to leave one by itself at the pet store

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-11-01
     They are a flock bird, see the 'social behaviors' section above. It may be that with only three, you have a pair with an 'odd man out' situation. Because they socialize in a flock, you will want to get more to keep from having an isolated bird.
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Animal-World info on Society Finch
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Kathleen - 2012-12-22
I have these beautiful little society finches and I need some advice please. I've had 8 together and they have all lived very long healthy lives between 10 and 12 years. The last two of this group are quite elderly and one is failing. I'm keeping them warm and they are eating very well. My question and big concern is. What can I do in the event I loose one of the 2 to help the lone bird? I love them dearly and I'm very concerned about the event of having one elderly bird on it's own. I am hoping not to introduce another bird because this will continue to play occur. Is there something I can do to provide comfort and a happy environment for a lone older bird in this situation? I want to prepare for this in case this does play out this way. Thank you for any help and suggestions. Kathleen

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  • Jeremy Roche - 2012-12-22
    On average a finch will need only 5-7 days to come to terms with the loss of a companion. This time is mostly allowed so the finch understands that the dead finch really isn't coming back.

    If you don't supply your finch with a new companion at the end of that week he/she may indeed appear to still be depressed. This is normal. Not so much that he/she is still mourning the loss, rather the finch is simply lonely. In time and if you are around more often the finch may perk up and appear happier. This happens when the finch starts to view you as part of the flock. A mirror in the cage can also help the finch cope with being alone but note that some aggressive species may feel threatened by their own reflection.


  • Roger - 2013-01-16
    Helpful post and great sharing. Some thngis in here I haven't thought about before, I would like to use this moment to say that I really love this blog. It's been a good resource of information for me. Thank you so much!
  • Anonymous - 2013-10-29
    Last week i buy 4 social finch and a month later i hade 5 eggs they where so little i ne imagine to be that littlethen two weeks later there was baby chicks it was amasing
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Animal-World info on Pintail Whydah
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ghasan - 2013-10-06
I caught today two pintail whydahs one male and one female. I have 2 Budgies so I saw them come eat the food up from my budgies so thought its someone's finch that flew away but thanks to this website I know wht I have. Thanks guys!

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clive heldzingen - 2013-09-25
I have 2 feeders in my garden. The black and white whydah chases all the other finches away. how do I solve the problem. I try to chase the whydah away but this doesn't work

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Animal-World info on Strawberry Finch
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Rafi Sacarello - 2008-06-16
Hi, I'm looking for a pair of Strawberry finches because of their beautiful song. When I was younger you could set a trap and catch them easily because there where so many here in Puerto Rico. Now I think they are extinct and I cant find them here in PR anymore. If somebody reads this please let me know if you can help me find a good pair for reproduction. Thanks

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  • Will - 2013-09-11
    Rafi, were you able to find the strawberries in PR? I'm looking for a pair or more if available. Send me an email to matosw@gmail.com. Thanks.
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Animal-World info on Zebra Finch
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vickie schmitt - 2013-09-08
one of my female finches has lost her feathers under her wings, and around her behing. she seems fine, active, and eating. can anyone help me to understand whats going on with her please. is she sick? or just molting?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-09-08
    Zebra Finches will pluck at each other, estabishing a hierarchy (or pecking order). The best thing to do is move her into her own cage until her feathers regrow.
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Animal-World info on Pintail Whydah
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Gina - 2013-08-14
First, thank you for your site... I have a male and female Pintail, Tuxedo and Chickie, Tuxedo is in full breeding plumage. My questions, when Tuxedo drops his tail feathers, will he still be so busy flying around? The other is Chickie seems to display the same flight dance, but only with the other finches not Tuxedo? What is this about? Thank you for any help, they really do liven up the place.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-08-22
    My guess is that he won't change his flying behavior too much. I'm not sure why they would not dance with each other, but it is almost impossible to get these guys to actually breed in captivity! They need to be exposed to other birds in the wild because by nature they lay their eggs in other birds nests and don't raise their own young!
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