Animal Stories - People Talking About Types of Finches


Animal-World info on Zebra Finch
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Sultan Yaldiz - 2012-05-01
I have 2 finches and there is one baby bird and i gave them spray millet. and the next thing i know they are trying to get the enormous millet into the nest so the baby could eat it eat , i cant stop them.

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Ronald Corpuz - 2012-04-27
Hi I'm Ronald a pet lover especially birds. I would like to thank for info about zebra finch bird cause I've learned how to take care of them. My birds hatch 2 eggs, very much exiting to watch how they grow on my hand. Thank you so much God bless us!

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Animal-World info on Society Finch
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Val - 2010-11-05
I adopted two Society finches two weeks ago. The female is missing her feathers on her chest and seems to be bullied by the male - she is very timid and quiet. To break up the drama I got one male and female zebra finch and put them in the cage, along with a new toy. I would have gotten a society pair but I wanted to be sure I was getting a male and female. Now the male society is bullying the female zebra! The male zebra tries to protect her but he is smaller than the male society. Tonight the female society is hiding in her nest and has started putting some nesting material in it. Is the male society just protecting her or being a bully? What should I do to make sure they all get along? The have a large, clean cage and I freshen their food and water each morning. They have spinach daily and two nests to use, as well as a cuttle bone and nesting hair from the pet store. The pet store offered to swap out the male society. Please let me know what you suggest!

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  • Cody - 2010-12-22
    I think you should just put the male society finch in solitary confinement. That's what I did when one of my Zebra finches was screeching and squawking at the other one. And it worked.
    I felt like a terrible owner when my female society finch died. Her name was Ivy and she had over 14 eggs all in different clutches. I suspect the cause was egg binding and if anybody has some advice I'd greatly appreciate it.


  • Lucy - 2012-03-09
    I have recently bought a male and female zebra finch and I am interested in buying another breed that will get along with them. Other than the society what other could I get that would be a grassland type and get along?
  • kane - 2012-04-21
    You are keeping your Bengalese good leave them how they are, but don't give them broccoli daily only 2 times a week. Just leave them alone to breed but if you see the male has no interest after or before to lay or don't help her build the nest you must swap it with another interested male. If the female is building and staying in her nest she is interested and if you see him quiet while she is building her nest he is hopeless so you must swap him with a better and more interested male
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Animal-World info on Red-headed Parrot Finch
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Myra Welsh - 2012-04-10
Just got a pair of parrot finches. Finding them to be very agressive with my Gouldians. He is much more agressive than her. Any suggeestions as to what I can do to help them settle in?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-04-11
    Yes, the new finches would be a little agressvie toward the Goulidaisn. The Gouldians are a little more laid back. Finches are a little more high energy and flight. The male would be more agressive as he is probably thinking he is protecting the female or he is protecting the female. In any case, these birds should not be housed together.
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Animal-World info on Pintail Whydah
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DLPW - 2009-09-19
I spotted and took photos of the Pin-Tailed Whydah on July 11, 2009. I live in Cantonment, FL and while bird watching in my back yard as usual, this unusual visitor came in, fighting with a Mockingbird before settling on the ground around the base of one of my feeders for a short time. Until today, I didn't know what he was. Glad to see someone else in the surrounding area (Milton and Pensacola) have also seen this beauty!


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Animal-World info on Zebra Finch
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Chuck - 2011-07-10
I volunteer in the local nursing home as patient advocate and just general companion. Yesterday one patient showed me the Zebra Finch in the fairly large aviary in the activity room. I have been birdwatcher for years but know nothing about exotics nor pets, but this one was so meticulously marked and social, I did some research and found what it was, that it is most likely a male of in determinant age, probably donated by someone who died, and is in a cage with two other exotics (cocka-somethings) one of which does communal grooming with the Zebra. The Zebra and I had quite a conversation and the patients who watched were amazed.

My question is: Should I leave this whole situation alone, or would the Zebra be so ecstatically more happy with a mate that I should take on the extra duty of getting one, taking the proper measures which seem to be lacking for their (and at present his) care, and maybe learn a whole bunch more about Zebra Finches, and give at least some of the more aware patients something more to do than sit around and wait which is what most of them are doing now.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2011-07-10
    It sounds like the zebra finch, Poephila guttata castanotis, is happy to me! They are definitely social birds, and if the one you describe seems to be doing well with the other birds in there and enjoys their company (they may be cockatiels?), then it is probably fine to leave him alone. If you wish to move him however, you would probably want to consider getting him a companion because as I said, they are social birds and do best with company so that they do not get lonely. If you think he is getting adequate care (food, cleanliness, etc.) it is really up to you whether you think you should move him or not.a
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Animal-World info on Strawberry Finch
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KARUNA PACHER - 2010-06-10
Hi my name is karuna i am desperately looking looking for mutations in the zebra finch especially the phaeo and black faced and charcoal in bahrain. Its available but rarely and first come first serve basis. I would be happy if someone could help me with this. Healthy birds please right now i've got about 60 birds looking for more if i get a reply would speak to the person concerned on phone to make it easier thank you cheeeeers

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Animal-World info on Zebra Finch
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Elly 'sharkey' Bourne - 2012-03-08
I have two zebra finches who get on very well together, but there seems to be a problem with the male. At first I thought he wasnt well, puffy feathers ect. But later on he seemed to be alot better, but he's not moving around much. He's still eating lots and happy enough. After looking closer at him I've realised one of his claws has twisted upwards. I was questioning the lack of movement would obviously be because of this. But I'm unaware if the claw will heal naturally. My finches are not easy to hold and we have only had a short while any advice or will it be a vet job?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-03-08
    Probably the lack of movement is because he hurt hiis toe. ou can hold him easily enough using a towel and take a good look to see what has happened. He may have twisted the toe and it should heel on it's own - but when you llook if there is ingrown claw, swollen, sore, gash - you should take him to the vet.
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Animal-World info on Pintail Whydah
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Martine - 2008-07-17
And here I thought I was special! A male Pintail Whydah chose my backyard as his playground in the Spring of 2007. I live in East Orange in Southern California -- just a few miles from Tustin. I felt so blessed! Every morning I looked forward to seeing him and his antics and hearing his high-pitched sounds. I got quite attached to the little fellow. He never seemed to be very successful with the ladies though. Not that he didn't try... Then mid October, one day of cool weather and drizzle, and he vanished. I hoped he had simply decided to move on to warmer climates. Bad timing though, as a few days later the devastating San Diego wildfires started and raged on for days. I thought of Whydee and hoped he had made it through. Then this Spring (May 12), to my amazement, there he stood in the middle of my lawn, letting me know with his familiar racket that he was back. He had lost his tail and his breeding plumage, but I just knew it was him. He has been hanging around ever since, looking prettier and his tail growing every day. Throughout the day, he comes and taps on the windows. He is very assertive and unafraid, but still has no success with the female population of assorted species who frequent my bird feeder. I am now thinking that I should call the local pet shops and find him a mate. I feel I owe him that... Is that crazy?

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  • Marilyn Martin - 2011-08-28
    How fun for you that little whydah kept coming to see you, FYI, I just purchased one a couple of months ago and just love him his song is very
    pretty, I bought him at the Chino Swap Meet, you should get one for inside.
    He was only $30. I noticed this was 3 years ago is he still coming around?
    my email is angelhairr1@verizon.net. BTW they have girls and boys there. Have fun!
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Animal-World info on Society Finch
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Need Help - 2012-02-11
Hi,

Need to know if there are ANY stores at ALL in Canada that can tell female and male society finches apart... Places like Petshop and PetSmart don't have a clue as to what they're doing. HELP.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-02-11
    Guaranteed, if it lays an egg, it is a female. There is no 1000% way to determine the sex of a Society Finch except through DNA sexing. You can purchase a DNA sex kit, I believe for $25.00, from one of the labs advertised in the back of Bird Talk Magazine. That said, usually the males sing to the females - it ispart of courting. So watch the behavior and see who is singing. The female doesn't usually call out or sing back unless she is separated from her mate. The males head is usually a little wider, a little flatter than the females. Females head is more curved and narrow. No one - no pet store, can tell you more than and great guess when it comes to these little guys but a breeder is your best bet and can do it with pretty good accuracy.
  • bill m - 2012-02-12
    Me and my dad raise finches and it's hard to determine the sex by looking at them but what you can do is seperate them cause only the male bird will sing and the female species does not sing. That's one sure way to tell other than going to a vet which cost money. Hope this helps you out
  • bill m - 2012-02-12
    Seperate the birds cause only the male bird will sing. The female species won't sing then you will know which one is male or female. It's cheaper than going to a vet to have them sexed
  • bruce - 2012-02-21
    The only sure way is to get the male to sing. You will need small individual cages (2-3) to house individuals. If no one sings they are girls. In a group of 4 or so it's is quite likely one will bounce and begin courting. This is obviously the male. This bird can then be used to sex the rest. The other way is to pay for dna testing.
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