Animal Stories - People Talking About Parrot Species


Animal-World info on Senegal Parrot
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Steve - 2012-05-31
Can someone help me. My female Senegal Parrot is 25 years old. A few months ago, she started making a squeaking type cough and not very often. Lately, though, she does it more often, especially in the morning. She does not display the symptoms of a sick bird (no watery eyes, no drooping feathers, droppings are fine, etc). She's very healthy, full of energy, and eats well. What could this squeaky cough be and what might cause it? How can it be stopped. Thanks. SB

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-05-31
    I can't know but my guess would be that your Senegal heard someone make this sound and for some reason she likes the sound. So she keeps making it similar to being the microwave beeper. I had an amazon that loved to hear my daughter burp and that amazon would burp (big time) everytime we had company over. It seems if behavior, vent, eating are all OK and behavior is fine - Senegal should be fine. I would check her nostrils to make sure nothing in them but is there someone in the home that has made a similar sound?
  • Richard - 2012-06-09
    First, it is heartening to know your Senegal is in good health at 25-years-old. I often worry about changing symptoms and behavior of my 14-year-old Senegal, Zoe. She finally stopped picking her feathers which worried me immensely but now she is back to looking like a normal beautiful Senegal. I have hepa filters installed in just about every room in the house. So, you might try that if you haven't already. We get lots of fine dust in the air even though we have double-paned windows and we seldom open any windows (I live in Central Texas). I give both of our birds clean fresh water out of the filter receptacle from our refrigerator and I often change it two or three times a day depending on how much they dip their food into the water container. We bird owners often treat our little feathered friends like family because they really are family. You really get attached to them and likewise they to us. But it's sort of like the Golden Rule -- treat these wonderful God's little creatures with the same loving care we would want for ourselves and our loved ones.
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steve - 2007-03-27
I adopted Harley in June of 2004 due to my best friend and his wife having no time to spend with the bird. At first he did not like me one bit, being agressive and quiet. In October of 2004 me and my fiance moved out on our own and he's come along very much. Harley is still agressive with my fiance and anyone but myself, but everyone who comes in contact with him is warned ahead of time. For food he gets 3 to 5 baby carrots, and the food we get from the bulk section of a local grocer which has a variety of seeds, peanuts, and other varieties. His cage really hasn't changed since i've owned him but when someone is home, his cage is always open along with his ladder that touches the floor. He knows the microwave, sirens, telephone, says hi, says dadda, momma, harley, mickey, dances, paces when he wants me, and he hangs himself in the cage (either upside down, or in the corner) so we can pet him. He's an awesome pet but when he gets out of line, he gets a spray of water to let him know he's bad.

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Animal-World info on Meyer's Parrot
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Cherie' Cruver Zehm - 2012-09-23
Years ago I founded the national non-profit corporation ZehmZoo Avian Rescue, Rehabilitation and Sanctuary with headquarters in Washington State. We have rescued many Meyer's Parrots over the years, and I have become expert in rehabilitating the poor creatures who have been teased to the point of ferocious biting because members of their companion families did not know how to deal with the Meyers' sometimes feisty nature. Many of these poor little creatures, when in the act of committing a rather painful bite, have been banged repeatedly on hard walls, furniture, floors or anything that is convenient to dislodge them at any cost, without any consideration as to what this action is doing to the bird's brain, neck, spinal column and tendency to develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I have treated birds who have developed brain damage. My husband and I have developed a method of safely removing a Meyer's which leaves both parties minimally-damaged and still affectionate friends. I call it the Precious Press, named after a wonderful female who had suffered enough brain damage from this kind of abuse in her past that it finally took her life. With the Precious Press, as your Meyer's begins to bite down, you immediately take the thumb and index finger of your free hand and apply them to opposite sides of the bird's head. As you slowly increase the pressure, being careful to avoid the eyes, the technique seems to release endorphins into the parrot's bloodstream. The parrot quickly releases his or her hold and stands quietly as though nothing has transpired to upset him or her in the first place. At this point you can give the parrot a 'head rub', letting him or her know that all is forgotten, and you can continue with many years of a healthy relationship.

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Animal-World info on Eclectus Parrot
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melissa - 2012-09-09
I have just purchased a 4-6 mth old rainbow lorikeet when do I start to train him

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-09-09
    You would start now.  Keep training session short - 10 - 15 minutes but you can do them 2 -3 times a day. 
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Animal-World info on Senegal Parrot
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Bree - 2012-09-03
I have an African Senegal named Senebell (I named her when I was about 5). She does everything with me from taking showers, to riding in the car. She is very attached to me. If anyone comes over, she gets very defensive because whoever it is that comes over is stealing my attention. She is just now learning how to navigate the house. Every now and again, I'll find her in the kitchen looking for me. This used to be a bad thing because she could run into a window and potentially break her neck, but she has gotten better at flying in the past year. I call her the homing pigeon because she normally flies back to her cage. She loves her toys including bells (hence Senebell) which she rings when she wants attention. She also loves to chew things. Chairs, towels, newspaper, books, really anything she can get to. She has started to try to create nests, so I stopped by the pet store and got her one of those little nests for the side of her cage, but she has become very fond of those square tissue boxes. She is a very loud little bird. If anyone enters/exits the room, she screeches at the top of her lungs. She also 'eeeps' and whistles when she's looking for me.I think that she is the best pet that I could ever have. If you are looking for a pet that will be forever attached to you, I highly suggest getting an African Senegal.

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Animal-World info on Eclectus Parrot
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Tambra Paredes - 2012-08-24
The bird with toe tapping and wing flapping I have heard to give them a hard boiled egg 3 times a week.

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Robert - 2012-04-24
I am about to purchase a female eclectus I am told she is approx 13 months and appears to be a Vosmaeri, however she has no yellow in her tail feathers , would she be hybrid any help would be appreciated. as I am a beginner.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-04-25
    A Vosmaeri Eclectus at 13 months would have yellow in her tail. She would have already molted and have her adult coloring (which may even get more yellow by 3 years). However, she would definitely have the yellow coloring in her tail. She is not Vosmaeri. Question. Can you handle and hold this bird? Can you pick her up and have her sit on your finger? Can you move her from one place to another? Does she 'step up'? Can you pet her? If the answers to any of these questions are NO, then do not buy this bird. A female eclectus in the wild is a very agressive bird, fighting to the death if she has to in order to protect her nest. Many people have female eclectus that are just wonderful poets, but they are not a great first bird. They are independent, tempermental and their bite is just horrible. Body language is difficult to read. If you can pick her up, hold her, pet her - then fine - if you can't do not buy the bird. You would not buy a puppy or a kitten that you couldn't hold - same is true for a parrot.
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Abi Leonard Al Omari - 2012-07-24
I am looking for parrot rescue organizations in Indiana. I have a female ecelectus and would love to get a male. I wouldn't mind having another female but I am worried that they would fight since females are so territorial in the wild.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-07-24
    Go to www.bing.com and type in Indianna Parrot sanctuaries and there are several.  A place to start and you ar right two females will not likely get along.  They have beenknown to fight to the death in the wild over a nesting spot.  Females can be quite agressive.  Males are easier going.
  • Michel - 2012-08-21
    My mom used to volunteer for a recsue and would adopt/find homes for cockatoos. We have one citron thats over 40 years old and was thrown away into a dumpster where someone found him. He picked and he started biting the flesh off his chest and left a huge wound. He's better now but still picks and has to wear a jacket when he gets really bad. They do extreme things when they're upset and it's hard or sometimes impossible for them to fully recover. It's irritating to see all these rude comments
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Animal-World info on Meyer's Parrot
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Stephanie Valentin - 2012-08-12
I just got a meyers parrot a few weeks ago, it was hand raised and I was there through the whole thing but its very nasty towards me and bite through my skin. What do I do?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-08-12
    If the parrot was truly hand raised, it would not be biting you unless you are torturing it (which I doubt).  The seller didn't give you the whole truth and it is doubtful you know the age.  I'd take the bird back.  I would go to a reputable breeder and purchase a parrot that you can hold, kiss, cuddle and just love on.  You would not excpect a puppy or a cat to bite you and a hand fed baby bird does not either.  If you want to keep him, then you will have to buy a book on how to tame him.  Me, I would take it back and I would write all over the Internet and this breeders page as to what she said and how this bird behaves so others do not purchase from her.
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Tyler - 2012-04-28
Hi! I know the last comments here are from a long time ago but....I have meyers parrot and she/he has been masturbating all the time. It's really gross. What can I do to stop it?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-04-29
    If that is what he is doig seems odd but try letting him out to play and more activity and attention.
  • cheryl sawyer - 2012-08-08
    it may sound strange but you are stimulating the birds reproduction instincts. You need to not encourage that behavior. Do not rub down its back or at the base of the tail just pet its head. You can also try shortening daylight hours to get out of breeding cycle. Breeding cycle may happen once a year or could happen more often.
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