Animal Stories - Eastern Rosella


Animal-World Information about: Eastern Rosella

   The Eastern Rosella is one of the most popular and most beautiful parakeets in aviculture. Being so very brightly colored, they are very attractive birds!
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louise wilson - 2014-06-28
I have an eastern rosella named rainbow as I've commeted earlier this year as she's now gained all her trust in me and others around her... Finally! She will let me know when she wants to be fed or petted etc. There's just one problem and I'm a little worried as I'm a mum-to-be... Is my pet bird a danger or a hazard to my baby when he arrives?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    In general I would say no, but yet the bird may get jealous of your diverted attention. Therefore, I would not allow the bird out of its cage in the same room as the baby unsupervised. You can be too careful and birds can be unpredictable at times.
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allen clark - 2014-06-08
dose anyone know where I can get one of these magnificent birds my email is allen_clark45@yahoo.com please tell me

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  • Mohamed Kaarim - 2014-06-17
    I have and I'm from Maldives.
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louise wilson - 2014-02-02
Iv got an eastern rosella parrot and shes lovely ( at times when I treat her to new equipment ). I got her given to me about 6 - 7 weeks ago and from day 1 she sat on my shoulder but did tend to bit but she wasnt being aggresive untill it came to me or anyone else putting hands in cage!!! I thought she would always be alittle aggresive but each day she is gaining more trust in me :) today she let me stroke her belly and head and she loved it!!!! Does anyone know how long their life spam is as my bird ( Rainbow ) is 7 years old??

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-02
    Sounds like a wonderful bird, and they are so pretty. The average lifespan of the Eastern Rosella's is said to be around 15 years, so you should have a wonderful pet for a long time.
  • kljsdjf - 2014-04-25
    They live from 20-30 years.
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Lohenet Smith - 2014-04-22
I have a male eastern rosella and a female indian ringneck. This morning i went out to my aviary and found them mating, is there a possibility that they could reproduce?

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DAN DANG - 2012-06-16
I have 2 golden rossela birds, but I don't know which one is male or female, please let me know how to know them male or female. Thank you very much

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-06-16
    There is no way to accurately determine 100% as to which is the male or female in the Rosella except through DNA sexing.  The DNA sexing kits can be purchased via ads in the back of the bird talk magazine.  Some say the male is a brighter red, the female is slightly smaller etc and possibly if you are a breeder and have many of these parrots, this may work some of the time.  DNA sexing is the only sure way = unless one of them happens to lay an egg.  This site makes suggestions as to how (possibly) you can distinguish the differernce -    All I know is that if it lays an egg - it is a gal or you can DNA sex.  If you have two males, one will most likely assume the role of a female so via behavior or coloring - it is not accurate    http://www.avianweb.com/easternrosella.html    
  • Gideon Swart - 2012-06-17
    If the Golden Rossela is 6 months old or older , then is possible to see what the sex of the bird is. If one look at the back of the head , the female has a gap in the red portion. The male has a solid red area behind his head. In the picture of the rossela on this site one can clearly see the gap in the red area behind the head of the female
  • cariann - 2014-04-04
    Look for spots under the wing, if there are spots it is female, if not it is male.
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Ben - 2014-02-05
An eastern rosella flew out of a tree and landed on my girlfriends shoulder. It was looking seriously malnourished and desperate. Needless to say Madeleine brought it home. When I saw it I didn't believe it was an eastern rosella, it had no feathers on it upper body what so ever, and without any feathers on his face he reminded me of Steve buchemi with his google eyes. That's how he got his name Steve. Steve was surprisingly tolerant of human contact, it was almost like he was hand reared and had escaped. After some research we worked out he was still very young as he still had juvenile down under his wing feathers.

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Ben - 2014-02-05
An eastern rosella flew out of a tree and landed on my girlfriends shoulder. It was looking seriously malnourished and desperate. Needless to say Madeleine brought it home. When I saw it I didn't believe it was an eastern rosella, it had no feathers on it upper body what so ever, and without any feathers on his face he reminded me of Steve buchemi with his googly eyes. That's how he got his name Steve. Steve was surprisingly tolerant of human contact, it was almost like he was hand reared and had escaped. After some research we worked out he was still very young as he still had juvenile down under his wing and back feathers. It took a few weeks but with good feed plenty if water and a large cage to sleep in at night he recoverd his feathers back and actually got chirpier. He was being a really cool bird. Any how I will get to the point. Recently we went away for a weekend and when we returned he was a different bird. He was really aggressive and quite cheeky. The problem was exacerbated when we had to go away again two weeks later. He is not the same bird and it can get quiet scary when he decides to attack you for moving the remote away from him so he doesn't chew the buttons off. His attitude has gotten to the point where I'm ready to let him go. Madeleine on the other feels as if Steve chose her and is willing to persevere for a while longer. Has anyone had similar things happen to them with their birds? And if so what did they do to remedy the situation? He has heaps of toys and gets to fly about pretty much all day. He is only put in the cage to sleep. It's almost like he's acting like a spoilt teenager. Please help!

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-06
    He does sound like a spoiled teenager...lol. Rule of thumb, it takes a parrot about 30 days to acclimate to a new home and come to know you as their 'flock'. But they are like children, and after that they may try different behaviors to get attention, or to be dominant. They do often have a 'teenage' period during maturation where the behavior can be like what you described, though from what you said, I think your bird may be a little young for that.

    Any change in established routine, environment, or companions is difficult for them. Establish a routine and stick to it. Rather than giving the bird free rein in the household, you could try to give him some specific times out of his cage for exercise and to interact with you. If he mis-behaves while out, then you can use return him to his cage early as a notice that the behavior is unacceptable. When he is being good, offer treats, praise, and lots of interaction. Time, affection, and patience are necessary.  Parrots are wonderful companions and I'm glad Madeleine is willing to be patient and perservere.
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peter shioda - 2014-01-16
hi my eastern rossela is 15 months old. i had her 4 my 50th. she was very nervous but with a lot of time spent with her 1 on 1. she will take food out of my hand and luvs 2 fly free. just talk 2 her gently, she will come round, but any strangers she will become aggresive. she's protective like my rotties, ha ha be patient

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victor ramirez - 2009-03-30
My rosella is fighting the new rosella that I just got and it is a female. Trying to get them both to get along but we can't, now we got them in a split cage. Is that a good thing to do. If that doesn't work what should I do next.

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  • richard thomas - 2013-11-08
    Ok, birds are sort of territorial. If you put them togather, do it in a roomy neutral cage. I usually have a third cage for coming and pairing up of birds. Works better for me. They will fuss a bit usually, but will pass in time. In most cases they will usually bond like this.
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Marisa Fourie - 2013-10-14
I had a pair of Mealy Rosellas and a pair of Golden Mantle Rosellas. One of the Mealies suddenly died and one of the Golden Mantles flew away. We thought to keep them in separate cages was a waste and decided to put them together. At this stage we thought that both were males. Then suddenly we didn't see the mealy anymore and looked inside the nest box, only to find that the 'he' is a 'she' and she had 4 eggs! Now we have two beautiful babies. Both look like the father, the Golden Mantle. A friend of ours told my husband that the babies are mules. Can anybody please tell me if this is the truth?

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  • imran - 2013-11-04
    Hi! myself i have been looking for answer of same question. i have been surfing on internet cant get any link. if any one knows plzzz tell us.
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-11-07
    When two distinct species coming from the same genus are cross-bred, the offspring are called interspecific hybrids. In this case it is the Mealy Rosella 0r Pale-headed Rosella (Platycercus adscitus) being crossed with the Golden-mantled Rosella (Platycercus eximius elecica). Unfortunately it is true that the offspring of an interspecific cross is very often sterile.
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