Animal Stories - Blue and Gold Macaw


Animal-World Information about: Blue and Gold Macaw

The beautiful Blue and Gold Macaw is a champion of large Macaws in color and personality!
Latest Animal Stories
Theresa Pratt - 2012-04-15
Hi I wanted to know at what age do you start to wean your baby. Ours is somewhere between 10 months and a yr we are still syrine feeding him 2 times a day. I've tried vegetables sweet potatos eggs but he barley picks at these are we doing something wrong what should he weigh at 1 yr old he looks small. I can't feel any ribs but you can feel his little breast bone

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-04-15
    If your little fella was in the wild - he would be pretty independent by now and fledged from the nest. They like their feedings and I think their humans like it also. However, you should be definitely starting to wean him now. I'd give him 60cc at night before you go to bed (or he does) just like crackers and cookies for a child. I would also feed him cracked walnuts - just get some walnuta and crack them in half - he will know what to do. Cheerios, dehydrated fruit/nut mix from Goldenfeast is great. Crackers with honey -
    So give him the 60cc before bed so you know he isn't hungry and let him eat on his own. How long - most would tell you tht he should be weaned by now. Me - I'd say let him have the 60cc till he sorta doesn't want it. Shouldn't be much longer.
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Susan Lewis - 2012-03-25
I got my Blue and Gold Macaw last week, Cozmo is 15 years old and a welcome addition to our zoo. Cozmo belonged to a family that lived in Pennsylvania and they were moving and unable to keep him. He is very friendly and started talking for us the second day he was here. He has said about 15 different phrases and keeps surprising us with new comments every day. My personal favorite occured last night when all of a sudden in a very clear voice I hear 'Shut Up' coming from his cage. People must realize when they take a parrot into their care that you have a pet that could very well out live you. They demand alot of attention and care, and should never be bought on impulse. I have a dear friend that has a parrot rescue and helped me in getting Cozmo, I would never purchase a parrot, there are so many that are in need of good homes.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-03-26
    Parrots are definitely cxomplicated creatures and so intelligent, it is hard to believe. For whatever reason (although I believe I know the reason) they all seem to learn the words 'shut up' or 'quiet'. Of course they are never going to do it. Funny though. They always get the last word in.
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Sheila in Upstate N.Y. - 2005-09-30
I have a year old blue and gold name Baloo. He is my baby. He has been mine since he was just over a month old and has bonded totally with me. He goes to my 2 boys and husband once in a while, especially if they are eating. He will follow me around the house saying "up, up" and when he really wants up he says "upupupupupup". He has learned a few other words like hello and peak-a-boo, but they don't quite come out clearly, he's getting there. He loves to give kisses to anyone that wants one. He will sit and watch TV with me and just lay in my arms. When he is really cuddly, he will lay on his back like a dog and want his belly rubbed. He also has his very playful moods and wants to wrestle. When we sit at the table to eat, I have to make him his own special plate or I won't be able to eat in peace, none of us will be able to eat without getting our toes pecked at. He has learned how to climb all the furniture, even the office chair at our computer. Baloo is a very jealous bird. We have a quaker, a blue front amazon, and 4 cockatiels and Baloo does not like it when any of us hold them instead of him. He wants to be the number 1 bird in our house. He does not have to worry though, he is my number 1 bird!!

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Pan - 2012-02-26
I just got an 11 month old male blue and gold 2 weeks ago. We couldn't decide on a name for him so we just kept throwing names at him until he responded to one, so his name is Freddie. since about an hour after we got him he needs to play with me constantly, and spends alot of time on my head, trying to crack it open like a large nut! He's started playing very rough and bites me anywhere he can get a grip on me, and he bites really hard, and although its only playful biting, it hurts like Hell. Also tonight he pooped on me, the first time since we got him, he usually flies to his stand to poop, then comes back to me. He's a real pain in the neck, but I love him to bits. I don't care if he never talks, his personality more than makes up for it, although I think he tried to say 'hello' this evening

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-02-26
    He will talk - not real well but he will talk. I don't know what is true but this is real. Macaws - all of mine - seem to go through what I call a teething stage and it is about 1 - 1/2 years old. They chew on me, the rug, the spread, my shirt etc. They bite and chew on anything. Best thing is to grab the beak and say in a loud voice 'NO' or 'NO HURT' and let him know it is wrong. Be firm. Yes, it hurts and it gets too rough. Another thing I did was actually 'TIME OUT' where I would turn themover on their back and hollder 'TIME OUT' and count to 10. They get excited and are having fun and they need to know it gets too rough. Human babies will bite - puppies and so do macaws at this stage. They are not biting to bite - they are just playing too rough and you need to teach them. Yes, they love banging on your head - all is new and fun. You are the teacher and you have to decide what isd acceptable and what is not. Behaviors can be cute at 11 months but maybe not cute when full grown, independent and 10 years so think about what is acceptable behvior to you 10 years from now. You probably don't want the fella on top of your head. He is in control there. You need to be somewhat in control. I like the way you choose the name. That, I think, is the perfect way to do it. Sounds like your having fun - just think - now you get to go into the terrible twos. Enjoy.

  • Pan - 2012-02-26
    Actually it's more of a squawk than a 'hello'. He's not tapping my head, it's more like trying to rip my scalp off! I do roll him on his back, and sometimes he does it himself, but when I try to tickle or stroke him he just bites harder because he thinks we're wrestling. If I try to go anywhere around the apartment, he will fly to my head only a few seconds later. He has tried to remove my ear, my fingers, my wrist, has gone for my eyes, and tried to remove all my finger nails. He does NOT like being told 'NO' when he does the things he shouldn't be doing, but he does it all playfully, and in no way aggressively.
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Pan - 2012-02-26
I just got an 11 month old male blue and gold 2 weeks ago. We couldn't decide on a name for him so we just kept throwing names at him until he responded to one, so his name is Freddie. since about an hour after we got him he needs to play with me constantly, and spends alot of time on my head, trying to crack it open like a large nut! He's started playing very rough and bites me anywhere he can get a grip on me, and he bites really hard, and although its only playful biting, it hurts like Hell. Also tonight he pooped on me, the first time since we got him, he usually flies to his stand to poop, then comes back to me. He's a real pain in the neck, but I love him to bits. I don't care if he never talks, his personality more than makes up for it, although I think he tried to say hello this evening

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-02-26
    He will talk - not real well but he will talk. I don't know what is true but this is real. Macaws - all of mine - seem to go through what I call a teething stage and it is about 1 - 1/2 years old. They chew on me, the rug, the spread, my shirt etc. They bite and chew on anything. Best thing is to grab the beak and say in a loud voice 'NO' or 'NO HURT' and let him know it is wrong. Be firm. Yes, it hurts and it gets too rough. Another thing I did was actually 'TIME OUT' where I would turn themover on their back and hollder 'TIME OUT' and count to 10. They get excited and are having fun and they need to know it gets too rough. Human babies will bite - puppies and so do macaws at this stage. They are not biting to bite - they are just playing too rough and you need to teach them. Yes, they love banging on your head - all is new and fun. You are the teacher and you have to decide what isd acceptable and what is not. Behaviors can be cute at 11 months but maybe not cute when full grown, independent and 10 years so think about what is acceptable behvior to you 10 years from now. You probably don't want the fella on top of your head. He is in control there. You need to be somewhat in control. I like the way you choose the name. That, I think, is the perfect way to do it. Sounds like your having fun - just think - now you get to go into the terrible twos. Enjoy.
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-02-26
    You sorta really have to get some control over Freddie. This is what they do - it is normal but you just can't have him flying around and landing on your head or biting too hard. He could get hurt and you could get hurt. Many would tell you to clip his wings - I won't. I will say that you should firmly tell him 'NO' and put him back on his perch. If he doesn't stay then back in his cage. If he does fly to you, raise your arm up so he lands on your arm - call 'COME' and let him land on your arm - not on your head. Yes, they pull hair and chew on ears - you just have to be firm and it is 'NO' and then on perch or cage. He needs some training. Start with basics while on a perch. 'up' and just on your hand. 'come' and on your arm. 'NO' when poor behavior. Now it is cute and fun and funny but this fella is really going to be able to rule the home if you don't get him a little under control. Put words to anything he does - if he spreads wings say 'PRETTY' Carry him only with your hand and keep your thumb on one of his toes - you have control, he is secure.
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Jennifer - 2008-12-23
I have a 5 yr old gold/yellow macaw bird. I have had him for 3 yrs and he has been acting weird the last few days and don't know what he is doing or feeling or whats the matter with him. Let me tell you what he is doing. He (Oliver) sits in his swing and puts his butt up in the air and makes these weird sounds that I can't describe. Oliver is constantly wanting my finger to put between his beek and he goes back and forth if this makes any sense. When I got this bird he was a very mean and disturbed bird but now my children and I can hold and cuddle to him. He seems pretty happy most of the time unless we have company, then he yells a lot like he doesn't like a crowd. But like I said lately he has been acting like something is bothering him and didn't know if someone could give me a heads up what he is needing. I have tried doing some research and it's a dead end for me, so please help. Thank you Jennifer/Oliver

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  • Bryan - 2012-02-05
    Jennifer,

    Feb 05, 2012

    From what you are describing about your Blue and Gold macaw, doing the beak thing by nibbling and chewing on your finger and making certain noises he is bonding to you. by playing along with him he will soon regurgitate his food back to you, DO NOT get offended or grossed out, they do this to thier female Bird mate in the wild.

    Sometimes though they will bite harder than they should and it might hurt you. it is important that you set boundries to this behavior early on before it starts to get out of hand, Macaws are very intelligent, sensitive and loving creatures and you have to set boundries, just be firm, speak positive you don't have to yell at them loudly just a gentile somewhat sharp spoken NO!

    My wife and I have owned our female B&G macaw for 25 years we are the 3rd owners of her and she will play the beak thing with both of us. as for the squawking when company comes over.
    Several things are going on here,

    First Macaws are social birds, meaning they crave interaction with the family/crowd and or the flock, so make sure your bird is at or near where you and your friends are as they are extremely curious and very much like being the center of attention.

    Just rememeber on important thing!!! they are creatures of habit, if you start something and especially if they like if theylike it or get accustomed to it WILL demand it, and they seem to have super accurate clocks built into thier brains,our macaw demands her peanuts given to her at exactly 7:30 in the morning, this is the time my wife leaves for work in the morning, if she does not get them on time she will scream for them. this can be most annoying to us.

    They also crave attention and could be jealous of NOT getting any attention since you are paying attention to you friends or guests. so they scream for attention.

    A word of Caution if you bring your Macaw close to the action with your other guests and the bird is loose (outside its cage) on a open pertch monitor it closely so it does not lunge at you or guests out of jealously. Also NEVER EVER tease a Macaw as they have bad tempers and can easily hurt you or someone else.

    Also you should strongly caution your guests not to poke at your bird or provoke him or touch or pet him without your supervision or presence.
    thier beaks are large and powerful and they can inflict serious injury to you or anyone else. Sometimes they will bite without any warning or provocation
    and it will take you years of bonding and reading of your birds body language, they also read our body language and voice inflections as well, sometime they misinterpret our intentions and can become aggressive to you or others and we are left wandering what happened, what did I do?

    If you leave the birds immediate sight it might take flight or jump off it's perch out of fear from not being comfortable with your new unfamilar guests and if he has already bonded with you, he will not want you to seperate from him, Macaws mate and bond for life with thier choosen mate both out in the wild and in captivity, if they do not have a bird for a mate, Guess what??? they will choose their human care taker for their lifelong mate.

    All things aside, they are wonderful creatures and my wife and I continue to have many great moments with our Macaw, and our African Grey whom is Just way too Smart for his Britches (Grey Feathers) we both find ourselves having short meaninful conversations with our grey he answers us back with just the right words many times sentences at the right time with the proper tone and inflections if you were in the other room you would think you are talking to a human person. by the way our gray does the beak thing with me only since he has bonded with me, but my wife can stil do toher things with him I can't.

    Both of them may just outlive the both of us.

    Hope this helps you

    Bryan
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Rebecca Stevenson - 2012-01-20
Your post made me laugh. Macaws are just so full of personality.

I'm 24 years old and have been looking for the perfect macaw for about a year now. Everyone keeps telling me I am crazy for taking on a long term commitment, but they don't realize I actually spend all my free time with my pets, I don't go out partying like most my age, I stay at home with my babies. I am a social gamers so computers are my form of socialization. (Sounds sad, but I have great friends, and enjoy life with them.)

The life span of a macaw is very frightening, which is why I have decided on one so early in life, most macaws I've met have outlived their owners who were much older than me, and now have severe depression and issues.

I've also have koi fish that currently are about 16 year old, I've been committed to their time and needs for almost my whole life. Koi can live longer than macaws, but indeed are easier to care for, but cost almost as much money in bills and supplies.

I first considered adoption, and I found a few macaws who were well socialized, and very friendly. I was very close to adopting this 24 year old greenwing, but someone else beat me to the punch.

Everyone I've met who owns a bird says they've never been happier. But recommend I get a baby macaw. I did consider this as well, I am in contact with a breeder who specializes in Camelot hybrid macaws, as well as dropping by a few stores so can meets macaws ands on.

I am also starting to volunteer with a macaw adoption, to get more hands on practice with macaws.

I would love to just go pick up a macaw tomorrow but a few things are holding me back. First off is noise. I adore the squawks of a demanding macaw, but neighbors might not. I've been researching on possible ways to entertain a macaw to keep the noise level down. Another scary trait is mating season. I hear macaws can become overwhelmed with hormones and many owners have been driven mad by the fuss. And the last is what happens if I need to travel for a week or two, trying to find a caretaker has proven a challenger. Plenty of vets, parrot stores, and airlines that allow pets in my area, but a babysitter is harder.

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Tamera Gibson - 2011-10-10
I have had my Blue and Gold for 3 years now and just recently she is continually trying to "mate" with me - she is constantly "mating" with the bars on the cage putting her privates through the bars and protruding it out. She is also spending a lot of time at the bottom of her cage and she has shredded her liners as if she is nesting. My question is; is this normal and should I encourage it by giving her bedding and nesting materials?

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  • hector - 2012-01-03
    It depends if you want her to breed yes yes this is normal but then she will become very aggressive no matter how calm she is just know all your hard work and training will be lost and very hard to regain and will just be come a cage bird and not a companion. To stop this limit day light in the morning keep her away from dark small boxes to hide and when she seems to try to make get her focus away from breeding if she lays eggs leave them there for about 1-2 months so she sees there not fertile and she stops laying more eggs because if you take them away she will try to breed again and try pre-shredded liner to see if she only wants to play and not make a nest
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david - 2011-11-18
Can they be taught to sit on your shoulder? I ride horses often, so I am also wondering if a typical example of this species would tolerate a horse back ride? Thanks!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-11-19
    I knew a gal who took her Blue Gold horseback riding but I don't remember whether the B/G rode on front of the saddle or on her shoulder. I am not sure I asked. I have seen B/G on the front of motorcycles riding behind a wind visor on a perch behind the handlebars. Mine rode just fine in a parrot car seat perch in the front seat. I would definitely get the B/G used to a parrot harness though. I don't know honestly how I feel about this but the ones I have seen on motorcycles truly seem to love it. Just go slow, be very careful and listen to your little guy.
  • Charlie Roche - 2011-11-19
    Whoops missed the easier question. It is hard to keep a macaw OFF your shoulder. It is their favorite place to sit. Many feel/believe that a parrot should not be allowed to sit on a persons shoulder as possibly would nip the face. I have sat on my humans shoulder for over 27 years and it would never occur to me to nip her in the face. Depends on the training/socialization/personlity of the bird. My humans macaw also rides around on her shoulder and the macaw is a big one.
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Claire - 2011-10-09
My Blue and Gold Macaw's beak has become very long and it needs to be trimmed. What causes the growth of the beak? What is used to file down?

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2011-10-09
    A Blue and Gold Macaw's (Ara ararauna) beak will continue to grow throughout its life (similar to the way our fingernails continuously grow). It is a good idea in general to provide your macaw with a mineral block or lava block (purchased at pet stores) that it can regularly use to keep its beak trim and in shape. However, if it becomes too long and needs to be trimmed, you may want to bring it into a pet store or into your vet to have it trimmed. They will have more experience and will help you trim it. For more information, you can read the general Macaw Care page.
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