Animal Stories - Peach-faced Lovebird


Animal-World Information about: Peach-faced Lovebird

   The Peach-faced Lovebird is a beautiful 'pocket parrot'. They come in a variety of colors and are the most commonly kept lovebirds!
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cathy - 2012-11-10
I am a new owner of my peachface bird that was found outside about a year ago. The bird has become very aggessive with me, but seems to like my husband. She works at trying to bite my fingers. How can I calm her down and get her to eat a better diet of fruits and veg. She will not touch it.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-10
    There are so many articles that say parrots should be given fruits and vweggies but some just won't eat them.  Dehydrated fruits and veggies (I am told) have the same nutritional value as fresh and Goldenfeast Fruits and Nuts Plus has dehydrated fruits and vegetables in it.   Check out Goldenfeast on Goggle as a wide variety of excellent products.  OK - second question is harder.  Your little feathered friend has seemingly chosen your husband as her mate and is very protective of him.  You can try and have her not be agressive toward you by doing things like giving her treats, talking to her and loudly grabbing her and saying  'NO HURT MAMA' or just 'NO'.  These things may or may not work. 
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wizgem - 2012-11-09
... Sorry, this is a repeat of post on Dutch Blue page that might be missed ... It's the season for leaves turning red again and persimmons are fruitful in our backyard that is also the happiest time of the year for my two dutch blue lovebird pals - Koka & Kola ... They love to munch on crunchy flesh of persimmons more than golden delicious apples which are their daily fruit diet during other seasons on top of their regular 'multi-grains'. But I'm a bit concerned when seeing them also pick on cuttle bones in between bites of persimmons which are rich in tannin. Does anyone know whether the mix of calcium and tannin will result in 'stones' for lovebirds?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-09
    I honestly do not know how to find this out.  I know excess calcium in humans can produce stones but whether it can in lovebirds - how would someone know.  Most people are walking around with kidney stones and never know it until one passes (if one ever passes) so in a love bird - how could they even x-ray to determine a stone which would be so microscopically small.  As far as tanin plus calcium producing stones - again I don't know how you could find out.  Essentially it is fruit and calcium and most birds/humans do eat that. 
  • wizgem - 2012-11-09
    Thank you very much, Charlie! I must have worried too much ... :o) ... I guess that as long as Koka & Kola are happy, nothing else matters.
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wizgem - 2012-11-07
I got my two lovebird boys from friends in 2010 when they were already 1 and 1.5 years old. I'm wondering if it's a good idea to get another two girls at same age to join them at this point? If so, where should I look for them? Anyone has good suggestion?

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  • wizgem - 2012-11-08
    Wow ... It sounds that there will be more than just a little bit work to expect with 2 more mouths to feed. Since we use both small and large (aviary) birdcages for only 2 little fella, so there might not be space problem. But first thing first, where am I going to get 2 Dutch Blue gals at right age (around 2 year old) and are tamed? Can anyone help?
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-07
    You have two fellas that are freidns and happy.  If you wish to breed then yes, go ahead and get a couple of gals and another cage and a couple of nest boxes.  Get formula, an incubator if you need one and then think about hand feeding (in case you have to) every couple of hours.  Love birds breed quite readily and it isn't like they will have 2 - 4 children and stop.  They will have babies (clutches for years).  Some times they will sit the eggs and sometimes they need to learn - especially in the beginiiing.  If you want them tame - you will probably have to hand feed.  I think it is totally amazing to see a litte chick hatch out of an egg and mom and dad take care of that little baby - but after a number of years and looking for homes for the babies - it can be tiring.  It can be a lot of work.  So if you just want to enjoy and have fun - let the fellas be -   If you want to breed and go into that work - then get the gals - but also think about the expense of second cage, formula, brooder etc.
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-09
    You don't have to purchase two gals that are the same age.  This years babies are fine so gals from 1 year to 4 - 5 years old would be OK.  Now you mention that you are interested in them being tame - if they bond which they will with their feathered mate - they probably won't be tame anymore.  They will see you as part of the family - but the part that feeds and cares for them - not a part that cuddles or can pet them.
  • Charlie Roche - 2012-11-09
    Whoops - where to look for them.  Google search for lovebirds for sale.  Look in the back of Bird Talk Magazine for ads or even on Craigslist.  It is a start.
  • wizgem - 2012-11-09
    Got all the answers now. Much appreciated !
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Robin B - 2012-10-21
I have a peach faced love bird that I purchased at a local bird show in September 1994. I actually purchased 2 siblings. They were home raised and hand fed. At that time they were 6 weeks old. The one that passed away 6 years ago at age 12 years was a nervous bird and picked at himself. Unfortunately one day, he picked a blood feather and passed away. I thought that his sibling would soon pass after him, but instead he became a happier bird, playing and dancing to certain songs played on the radio (He especially loves, 'I want to Rock and Roll All Night' by Kiss). He is now 18 years 3 months old. I can tell that he is getting older because he sleeps more and doesn't dance as much. But I do know that he has had a good life and I it has been a pleasure to have him in our families life. When he passes, I will post again how long he lived. That will be a sad day in my life.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-10-23
    AHH  he just might fool you.  They get older and maybe they need some extra rest but still having a good life cuz he has you.
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Pam - 2012-10-11
I got 'Blue' in March. He was about 8 weeks old-hand raised, very cuddly-I love him dearly. I work many hours and I felt bad about leaving him alone so much. (When I was home, I gave him loads of attention) I recently got another lovebird from the same breeder to keep him company. This one is about 8 weeks old, cuddly and not afraid of me. My problem is that Blue seems to hate this new bird. Not bonding with it at all. They are in separate cages and it's a good thing because when they are out together, all Blue wants to do is bite baby Rainbow's feet and fight. Is that normal?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2012-10-12
    It sounds like it will take them some time to become pals. It could be that your existing bird is very jealous of your limited amount of time. These birds are highly social and need ongoing interaction. They will most likely become more comfortable with each others companionship, and then they may well start to actually prefer each other, as that's not uncommon for lovebirds.
  • Pam - 2012-10-13
    Thanks for the response. It seems like they are getting along a little bit better now. I try to give them both alot of attention individually and togther. I think you are right on about Blue being jealous. He has had me all to himself for 7 months. Time will tell.
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Mario Micallef - 2012-10-06
Just came in and saw the underside of our lovebird, drained in blood. He seems ok, same usual happy self, but we are worried. Can anyone out there suggest somthing? Could it be the food, he eats a lot of sunflower seeds. He is very intelligent, and I trained him, so that every time he wants to get out of the cage, he picks up a small bell, in his beak, and rings it for attention, till we open the cage door. It would be a tragedy, if he dies, he has been here now for more than four years.

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Edwin Rivera - 2012-09-17
Sad day...after 21 years our peach face lovebird died. My daughter named him Lucy when she was just a baby (4 yrs old) not knowing the difference between male or female,he was a male. I must say that Lucy was a big part of our family giving us many years of happiness. As most lovebirds, Lucy love flying around the house, taking faucet bathes and playing with us, including Roxie, our chihuahua. Lucy will be greatly missed.

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Anonymous - 2012-09-13
I found a peach-faced lovebird in my tree outside. He stayed there for like 2 hours. I put some food in a cage and hung it in a branch. After about 10 minutes, he jumped right in! He doesn't seem to tamed, assuming no one claims him, how would I go about taming/bonding with him and how long would it be before we can let him out the cage without him flying around the house, trying to get away? Thanks a bunch!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-09-15
    You could let him out of his cage now, however, do it in a small room preferably without windows.  If you can just place the cage on the florr and sit down on the floor and try feeding him treats with your hand.  We don't know whether he has been a 'pet' and used to handling or not so just go slow.  Let him get used to the sounds of your home, your voice and the newness of the situation.  Watch him and his body language and look for him to be relaxed, easily fluffed, and they are curious creatures and will come to you.  I would do things like sit down in the bathrub with him and a towel in my lap.  I would try and pick him up - now i am not about to get bit so I'd watch but if he will just step up on my hand I would bring him to my chest and hold him against my chest and pet the top of his head.  Why the ub - they can't climb or seemingly can't fly out.  Why the towel - so he gets used to climbing up in my lap cuz I would put millet or some treat in my lap - cheerios.  Talk to him.  Go slow - you have plenty of time. 
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Jasmine - 2012-09-11
My lovebirds had 4 eggs Aug, 25 2012 and they Still haven't hatch but they still sit on them. what should I do?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-09-11
    I would let them sit them for another 12 - 14 days.  Incubation for lovebirds is about 24 days from when they first sit the eggs which is usually when the last egg is laid.    You say they had 4 eggs on August 25th - Now is Sept 11th so only about 16-17 days - I don't know if the eggs are fertile or not - but in any case you should let them sit them the full 24 - 27 days.  They may not be fertile but you don't want them to try and double clutch (lay another clutch right away) as can lead to calcium deficiency -
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Alyna - 2012-09-06
Hey I just got my amazing little yellow peach face Lola about 2 weeks ago and she wasn't hand raised so I'm slowly trying to encourage her to come out of her cage and get use to my hands. I was just wondering what the best way to encourage her to get use to my hand would be because I don't want to scare her! I was also wondering if there is anything else apart from her seed mix, millet and the ocassional bits of toast that I should be giving her because she really doesn't seem interested in any fruit or veg? (oh and I sadly got her wings clipped because I couldn't have a flying bird and I'm wondering if that would be affecting her trust? Also they could only tell me at the pet shop that she was between 1-6 mths so will that change how quickly she becomes hand raised?) Thanks!

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  • Clarice Brough - 2012-09-17
    Being a young bird should help in winning her trust. Birds have great memories, but if she is truly that young, she won't have a lot of history to work around. You could try cherios, I've used them successfully. Some birds just don't warm up to fruits and veggies easily. It will still come down to being calm and patient though:)
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