Animal Stories - Black Masked Lovebird


Animal-World Information about: Black Masked Lovebird

   The Masked Lovebird is a very popular species, second only to the Peach-faced Lovebirds, and is available in a number of attractive mutations!
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Felicia - 2010-11-02
I just recently got a Black Masked love bird. His mate died a few years ago and the previous owners also owned a Jenday Conure (which came with this lovebird), and they've paired up just fine. The Conure has no problems but the lovebird is incredibly hand/people shy and antisocial. His feathers are also a grey color, should I be worried? And what is a way to bring him out of his shell somewhat? I do have to be cautious though, the Conure is extremely protective of his little buddy..

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john - 2010-10-08
My lovebird just died, she was masked?
Maybe the female, can I get another one real fast or they will fight?
Will this one live without the mate?
I had them for about a year, or should I just get two new ones...?
Sad?

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fahad - 2010-10-05
I've got 2 love birds....but I don't know their species...can you please help me to find out which species they belong to? I can send you pics.....thnx.

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jennifer s. - 2010-06-18
I have a friend who has a black masked lovebird. She purchased him 7 yrs ago from a pet store, not certain of his exact age. She is very concerned, because his little head is not upright. This last week, he has difficulty holding his head up. She took him to vet. They did blood work and xrays, but is not certain what is going on. They told her they think he may have suffered a stroke. Is this possible? She says he has a good appetite. Can you assist?

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  • CoCoYoYo - 2010-06-18
    It's quite possible that the lovie had a stroke or perhaps injured himself... Did your friend take her lovie to an avian vet? If you are in the US, you can find a board-certified avian specialist by using the search function at abvp.com. You can search for veterinarians who will treat parrots at aav.org, too.
  • Warren - 2010-08-09
    I am not a lovebird expert but can tell you my story. I rescued a masked lovebird from a pet shop in Dec. '06, not knowing how old the bird was. She had not been socialized and seemed quite afraid of hands, so I assume someone may have swatted at her when she was young. So I simply was very patient and gentle with her, and she has become a cheerful and devoted companion.

    A year or so after I brought her home, she started perching with her head hung low. She seemed exhausted and often fell asleep and nearly fell off her perch before starting awake. The vet said there was nothing he could do. About that time I found a simple nest box in a pet store-- a coconut shell with a hole in the side-- and I brought it home thinking at least it would give her a safe comfortable place to sleep. She took to it immediately... then within a week she started spending all her time in there, so I was sure she was really sick. Even so, she seemed to be eating well and drank lots of water. Then one day I reached inside her coconut-- and found, to my astonishment, five eggs in there! I removed the eggs (which did not seem to bother my bird) and she resumed being her playful, energetic old self. That was three years ago. Since then, she has produced eggs on two other occasions, and she remains a sturdy, healthy, extremely happy bird.

    I think it has been helpful that I've always kept a cuttle bone in the cage for extra calcium in her diet, and I always put a pinch of bird diet grit in with her food to keep her digestive tract healthy.
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george - 2010-07-11
I know that we can often tell the sex of a love bird by the shape of their eyes. One has round eyes and one has almond shaped eyes but I forget which is which.

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DL - 2010-05-26
I rescued a black masked lovebird from almost being lunch to a hawk. It is beautiful and seems healthy. I would love to find him or her a mate but I do not know if it is male or female. How do I figure that out? The Birds name is "Lucky".

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  • CoCoYoYo - 2010-06-18
    You can keep a lovebird as a singleton -- they do not have to have a mate.

    To determine gender, you can have the vet take a blood sample for DNA testing OR you can do it yourself. Companies like Avian Biotech and Zoogen offer DNA testing. It's a good idea to do this even if you aren't pairing up your lovies. That way you are prepared for egg-laying and egg-binding, which can happen to female lovies (and other parrots) even if they are a singleton.

    Best of luck and bless your heart for coming to the little lovie's rescue :)
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cherry - 2008-09-13
Most well balanced lovebirds (well I have owned them for 20 years anyway) either ignore or play with a mirror until they can move on to the next thing. Most I would say don't like them. It's the confined solitary creatures with no outlet for communication with their own kind (sorry if you can interpret what a lovebird is actually saying/needing) that are practically damaged goods that respond to a mirror. Most people who have two, after long periods of having one, get two because they cannot spend time with the first one. The first one becomes wild long before the arrival of the second-but the root cause is confused. It would be selfish to think you should have the birds full attention on demand. I have 6 hand reared lovebirds in an aviary of 20 birds. Each of the six has mixed with a 'wild' bird and is as tame if not tamer than when they were in the nest. They still sit with me outside of the aviary in the garden without flying off.

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  • Dee - 2010-02-24
    Hi cherry, l'm after a pair of masked lovebirds. Colour doesnt matter, just want a hand friendly pair for my husband's birthday... he loves them.
    Are you selling any and are you in melbourne?
    Thanks, dee
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laurie - 2009-12-27
I have two Masked Love Birds, they both are about 1 year old, male and female.
I have set the cage with branches, etc. A bowl of seed. I'm trying to get them to
learn to notice food in different places (ex: bottom where the travel feeder is).
They have not noticed the water tube yet very well. We've had them for two months.
Does it take them awhile to learn the surroundings? Our finches see food on the bottom of the cage. I want these birds, like the parakeets, to learn food is also on the bottom (like the bath) so when we go on vacation, they'll go to the vacation feeder. What steps should I take to lead them to learn vegetables, feeders, etc?
I don't want to starve them.

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Ramiza - 2009-04-28
Hi I have a blue female black masked lovebird who is sitting on 8 eggs but the father has died. Will she still incubate the eggs til they hatch and care for the little babies by herself or should I get another male? My male that died was a green black masked lovebird pure breed, both are pure breeds.

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Samantha - 2008-12-04
i juss recently received 2 love birds from a friend, a black masked lovebird (roughly 6 yrs) and a pastel one (roughly 3yrs).
My male, the pastel one, has apparently made my female mean in the past. I was trying to change the food earlier and my female bit me so she could get out.

I'm new with lovebirds and am practically clueless. PLEASE give some advice on how I can start to handle them without losing a finger or two. I have a myspace as well..
myspace.com/evilpiggies2006
PLEASE HELP!!!

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