Animal Stories - People Talking About Doves - Pigeons


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Joy - 2013-04-18
Hi all! I have what I believe is a ringneck dove -- wild, with a permanently broken wing, but otherwise seemingly in perfect health. We tried initially to take him/her ('Peet') to our vet, but they would not see a 'wild' bird. I live in a really remote area, two hours from a 'real' town (just moved here in Dec '12). We are happy to keep and care for Peet (we have horses, chickens, cats, dogs -- all spoiled and loved), I just want to make sure this bird is not miserable and bored. Peet's in a rectangle cage, with several perches made of natural wood that he hops around on. Feeding parakeet seed, supplementing with greens, a tiny bowl of grit and a small glass bowl of fresh water (changed twice a day) is available for him. The floor of the cage is solid, lined with newspaper and a light coating of alfalfa hay. Tried the bird bath, he's not interested. Millet sprays and cuttlebone hanging in the cage. He's tolerant of us but obviously still scared of us a bit -- less so than other birds might be, I'm sure. Any suggestions for keeping little Peet happy and entertained are welcome! Thank you.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-04-22
    You are doing an awesome job! I have had ringneck doves and mourning doves that visit my outdoor feeder daily for several years. My experience is that if they get badly hurt, they go into shock and its really hard to get them to come back around and even start eating. So you should be very proud! You rescued a great bird successfully. They do take time to get comfortable with people up close, but it can be accomplished somewhat. Wild birds seldom develop the same level of trust that captive bred birds do, but with doves, they will often become quite tolerant. Good job again, and all the best to you both.
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Animal-World info on White Dove
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gordon - 2013-04-13
More than a comment; a question that perhaps you may be able to answer me, I would appreciate the help. I have a female white dove (smaller kind) with red eyes...she was lonesome for 3 months and yesterday I found a fantail male dove and I put the male fantail in the cage with my white dove and after observing them for a few hours I figured it would be ok to leave them alone for a short time but I heard some ruffling about and when I looked, the male was pecking on the female, giving her a wound on her neck...there was also a little blood on the newspaper on the floor, but no blood on the white dove, only a mark on her neck where she was pecked...I am afraid the bigger fantail male will kill the smaller dove if I leave them together...is this a posibility? Should I not put them together? I would hate myself if the male hurt the female more...will they get over it? Will they possibly become friends/mates? Thank you for any answers, comments...gordon.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-04-13
    It sounds like they aren't getting along all that great right now. If I were you, I'd keep a VERY close eye on them and see if they start getting along better. I wouldn't leave them alone together overnight until there have been no more episodes of fighting. It is quite possible that they could decide to be friends and become mates. But, you will just have to wait and see and monitor them in the meantime.
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Rhea - 2011-12-10
Great Web Site! I have found oodles of info on my white dove here. I do have questions I am unable to find info about. I have also posted what type of cage we have our dove in to give others ideas.
We have had our white dove 'Lonesome' for about 6 mo now, I took him (not sure if male or female) in because I felt sorry for him when I first saw him. He was kept in a very small parakeet cage with no perch bars and an some sort of towel he stood on, on the bottom of the cage.
We put him in a rabbit cage 30 inches L x 18 W x 21 feet T with a solid bottom, with several perch bars and food and water dishes on both sides. We sprinkle grit on the bottom to resemble what comes natural to them by ground feeding.
He was very clumbsy at first as he had to learn how to stand and navagate to the other perches because he obviously had never used them before. Now six months later he is a pro, He seems to be very happy. My questions are simple and I hope other Dove owners can help me.
1. I don't think he is your typical Dove, Everything I have read says they are quiet birds. Mine on the other hand is very vocal! He coos ALL THE TIME all day. He sings his mating call with that funny inhaling sound (like one of those moo-ing toys when you turn it upside-down!) I am at the point of frustration with him. I have tried everything to quiet him and the only thing that works is a lazer light. We make sure th'e light does not shine by his eyes as we are aware of the damage they can cause. We flicker it fast on the celing to divert his attention or we put the light on his feet and he stops and moves away from it because he doesnt like it on his feet. Any ideas or suggestions on how to quiet him? Not completly, just not as often.

2. Do Doves need/like nests? Should we try one any suggestions on the type?

Thanks ~ Rhea

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-12-11
    Little unusual and my guess would be that you have a male. I wouldn't keep doing the light thing cuz you just might really be scaring him. Hold him. Just hold him. Second option is to get a female and then yes you would need a nest box.
  • Lynda Bradford - 2012-01-13
    he is cooing because he is trying to attract a mate
  • abe - 2012-01-30
    With the light you might as well throw rocks at him. Stop that. He coos for love and attention. Take him out of that jail house you call a cage and love on him and let him walk and flutter around awhile. He is not going anywhere. We take our doves out on the porch and let them fly about to different perches. We also have a big cage out there so they can get some sun and fresh air, they love it. They don't just want to fly away from you, unless they know you are mean and don't really care for them. He is always going to coo. That is part of it. A partner will slow his cooing down some, but not completely.
  • alyssa - 2012-08-28
    Doves as a general rule are vocal creatures, that's their natural instinct. If anything, light spurs them on, the reverse of what you're after here. They are very communicative, sometimes just talking to them can be a solution; if you were going to provide a nest, you'd need a female. Yes they are quiet and tame, but they also like to be very much a part of what's going on, and love to show off too as well as playing ! Sometimes a male will get noisy when he's rambunctious and wants a mate.
  • janet - 2012-09-17
    It is hard for me to believe that the wonderful sound of a dove cooing could ever be bothersome to anyone. It is the most wonderful sound I hear everyday, To use a lazer light is border line animal abuse, that poor dove did not get a better home, perhaps you should give him away to someone that will enjoy the beautiful sound of his cooing.
  • Heidi - 2013-04-08
    Rhea Using a lazer light - yes, that is cruel! Cruel! Cruel! If you don't love the cooing then find that Dove a good home. You cannot do that to the bird, you will scare him to death! Is that what you want. I am hard on you, but that is cruel! If I lived nearby or could get the bird, I would take him off your hands and love him. I own a laughing dove that coos all the time and laughs all the time. He is so happy and I am never annoyed at his cooing. To get a dove to stop cooing is to take away what he is. That is the innate characteristics that God put into the bird when he made him. It's like a cat without a 'meow' or a cow without a 'moo' or a chicken without a 'cluck-cluck' - you get my point? You may be annoyed, but that's you and you cannot change the bird, you would be destroying it to try to change it. I commend you for taking the bird on after seeing the terrible condition it was it, which was pitiful and animal cruelty. I've had my dove for many years - he is my family. I love him so much. Please treat your dove right and never again do this. You would be far better off to give it to someone who will love it and one that enjoys the cooing. If you do find it a home, I would really make absolute sure that person has experience in handling doves. Some people just don't know how to take care of birds. I'm sure you don't want the bird to go to someone that would make it's life worse or mistreat it or neglect it.
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Animal-World info on Ringneck Dove
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Heather Canham - 2013-03-13
We have reared our ring knecked dove from 3days old. She was fine until she laid two eggs and since then she is friendly with my husband but chases me, squawks and lands on my head and chases me around the room. I have fed her since she was a baby and still help my husband feed her but she always chases me and pecks me. Don't get it why does she hate me?

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Animal-World info on Diamond Dove
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Jennifer - 2013-03-01
I recently bought a pair of Diamond Doves after seeing some at a client's office. I fell in love with their cooing. However the pair that I bought aren't cooing at all. What am I doing wrong/missing?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-03-02
    Hard to say why they aren't cooing. If you just got them maybe they aren't comfortable yet. If you've had them for awhile, there may be something in the environment isn't to their liking. Read the care info above to make sure you are giving them the best housing and food.
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Animal-World info on White Dove
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MC - 2013-02-27
I have recently acquired a white dove that I assume is male because it hasn't laid any eggs. He sings ALL THE TIME. Is this normal behavior? I hope he isn't lonely as his mate died a while back.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-02-27
    Hmm, most doves don't generally 'sing', but they do usually make cooing sounds. He may be lonely, but introducing a new bird isn't always the best idea because doves are territorial and they also mate for life. Do you give him plenty of attention? Doves usually like human interaction and can become quite friendly with their owners!
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linda - 2013-02-26
I just acquired a pair of male and female white doves. They are 8 months old, but were nest mates and are brother and sister. The female has been laying eggs, but the previous owner discarded them as she did not want more doves. I am getting conflicting answers on letting the brother and sister interbreed. He has been mounting her and they seem to be bonded at 8 months old. Will there be complications in the young if I let them breed? I do have another 3 year old female that has been laying unfertilized eggs and was wondering if it would be best to see if she and the 8 month old male would mate and put the 'sister' in another cage. Please tell me your thoughts on the 'interbreeding' as the 8 month olds were nest mates. Or if I am on the right track by putting the other female, totally unrelated in with the male. Thanks so much. Linda

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Pet Kid - 2013-01-19
I'm looking for a white dove as a pet and was wondering if anyone knew which dove to pick. I lost my bird (past away) and was looking for a new pet bird. I want a white dove but don't know where to get one (hopefully from a breeder). Also I want to know what type to get. Thx (: Pet Kid

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-01-20
    There is really only one type of White Dove. These birds are actually a color form of the common ringneck dove, and they make wonderful pets. The 'wedding doves' are not the same thing. They are a larger bird and are 'homing pigeons' that are used for release at weddings as they will return to their dove cote. The white dove is usually readily available from breeders. Check at your local pet store that carries birds. They may be able to get you one, or should be able to point you to a bird farm, breeder. or bird club.
  • gayla - 2013-01-31
    I have a white dove I need to rehome I am allergic to him, I just bought him a couple of months ago. With cage I am asking a rehoming fee of 40. if interested let me know thanks
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janet - 2013-01-23
My female has laid so many eggs in the last10 months and not one has hatched! Maybe my male is shooting blanks! The female is a second mate for my male, she is about 14 months and he is almost 8yrs old! Sure would love some babies! ! !

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asad - 2013-01-20
I have female white dove and her age is approx two years and she is already laying unfertile eggs. Now I got a male white dove and his age is approx 5 months. The female dove beat him and the male is very disturbed. Now my question is that please tell me can they be a pair or should I get another aged male? Thanks.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-01-20
    It's cool that your female is laying, but your male is too young. They shouldn't even be put in a breeding situation until they are at least 6 months of age. I'd say it's a 'wait and see' if you want these two birds to breed, otherwise you may want to find a suitably aged partner.
  • Anonymous - 2013-01-20
    Thanks Clarice.
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