Animal Stories - People Talking About Doves - Pigeons


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Jacki - 2013-07-18
I found a white dove on the side of the road about 3 years ago and I am trying to find out some information about doves (hense the interest in this site). He has some behavioral problems such as biting and I think this may be why he was abandoned. I am working on this, but I believe he was abused by former owners. He does want to be near me and play with me, but he just seems to peck me for no apparent reason. He'll be playing, then for some reason (?) he just starts to attack. He is aggressive with other people, but I believe, like I said, this may have to do with trust issues from a prior owner. I need to learn more about him, to find out what sort of 'goodies' I caan reward him with to help with this problem. He is very smart and likes to say good morning, and growls at the door with the dogs when someone comes. I guess he wants to protect me! With a little more information, I'm sure I can help him with his trust issues. If anyone has any ideas, please reply to thiss post. I will check back periodically. Thank you, Jacki.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-07-26
    homo-preening

    These types of doves are known to have a rather aggressive and territorial nature, known to defend their mate. They will contest other doves, but will also engage in hetero-preening (preening another) or nibbling a partner. From your description I'm guessing it is some sort of control behavior. It doesn't sound like aggression, as aggressive behavior includes an attack posture (head low and drawn close to the body), a rush, and often a challenging note. It may simply be looking at you as its mate!

    These birds can begin to have behavioral changes when they are kept singly. Some pecking behaviors are learned and very hard to change. One suggestion that I've heard can sometimes help is to provide a mirror. This has been known to help with perceived companionship and they will often love it, though they may then tend to stay by the mirror a lot.
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Lisette A. Olson - 2013-07-07
I am caring for a white with black neck & chest pigeon/dove. It was found in a parking lot approaching people looking for food. It was quite friendly. My daughter brought it to me due to my experience with birds. As much experience as I have I'm concerned I might be missing something important in the care. I have purchased several types of seed & it's eating happily. Making a mess by tossing the least favorite seeds everywhere. I've been reading everything I can find but not being sure of breed has me concerned I may be missing something. There is no band. It has red legs & is simply beautiful. I'd appreciate any input. It's most important to me to be SURE my bird is getting Everything it NEEDS. Thank you. I look forward to hearing from you. God bless, Lisette.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-07-09
    I think you are doing the best you can for the bird. Most pigeons and doves have similar needs in terms of nutrients. Buying a variety of seed mixes and offering them simultaneously is a good idea to make sure he/she is getting proper nutrition. Is there someplace you could bring it to determine for sure what breed you have? Such as a wild bird conservatory, or even a zoo of some sort?
  • Lissel - 2013-07-20
    We rescued a baby dove with a wing defect and like you fed seed mixes (canary-finch mix was recommended). 2 years later and we have converted her to pet crumbles for parrots/doves. Vet said they're much better for them, more complete nutritionally, and per the promotional materials we have found she wastes much less, eats every crumb, and no more seed everywhere! She's gained weight and we are hoping to avoid vet bills for repeat crop infections she was suffering. Hope this helps. P.S. took 3 days to change her eating, and now she loves the stuff.
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Iv - 2009-01-21
White Doves attract rats. This has been attested by our near neighbour. Not only that but their dropppings are a health hazard, not to mention the damage to rooves.
Their inane cooings are insufferable. Bring on the Sparrowhawks i say!

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  • A.Murphy - 2010-07-19
    How narrowminded. Too bad. Inane cooings?
  • Gina (aka Poobear The Texas Polar Bear :-) - 2010-09-04
    What a horrid way to look at the beautiful white dove. It is only natural that they have droppings as any bird does and not any bird has a pleasant dropping or considered to be healthy as far as walking in them. As for the cooing, it is beautiful and as with all birds unique sounds(chirps, tweets and peeps) is designed by God. I have owned my gorgeous white dove "Diamond Girl" for many years and she is nothing less than a pure delight. As for rats, I supposed anything that has droppings could attract them but I have never had a problem with my "D.G" attracting rats or any type of vermin or insects. Doves are a blessing from God as are all birds and animals. You're comment to bring on the Sparrow Hawks is very uncaring and inhumane. A person that owns a white dove loves them just as people love any type of animal that they are blessed to have in their lives.
  • lola norris - 2010-12-07
    From viewing your comment, all i can say is "you do not know doves. " they are probably the most gentle bird out there and beauty to the eye. All birds have droppings. And the cooings are the best.
  • Anonymous - 2010-12-21
    Not everyone likes the sound of doves. I have 5 and enjoy their sounds. I have had them for ten years and have not seen any rats. Perhaps your neighbor should acquire a cat to take care of the rat problem.
  • Devon - 2013-07-13
    Doves are known worldwide as the sweetest birds....and all birds have droppings.
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Animal-World info on Diamond Dove
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erica - 2013-01-17
If I do not want my doves to lay eggs right now, do I have to take out the male? If she already has laid can I take the eggs away or do I have to take the male away? Until I want her to lay? I would like them to stay together at all times!

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-01-17
    If you do not want fertilized eggs you will want to separate your male and female. The female may still lay eggs but they will not fertilize and therefore will not hatch if there is no male. If she has already laid eggs they may be fertilized. If you take the eggs out and don't allow the doves to incubate them with their bodies they most likely will never hatch, but it would be better to just separate the male and female to keep from having fertilized eggs.
  • felix - 2013-06-22
    Well you could keep them together for ever, in puerto rico i had around 100 pigeons and they laid eggs everday...if i didnt want to have babies i would just remove the eggs from the nest...that it,  good luck...
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Animal-World info on Ringneck Dove
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Phyllis Shapiro-Cash - 2013-06-08
A white dove flew onto my deck on Tues. and now returns several times a day. We were having dinner and she just perched on my husband's chair. 'She' eats from my hand and I've been feeding her dove birdseed from the pet store and some millet from the grocery. She appears to 'live' close by and is very tame and obviously used to people. I don't know where she was yesterday in all that rain. She's returned everyday sometimes several times each day since Tues. My grandchildren were feeding her and she landed on my granddaughter's shoulder! I wonder if she's living in one of my birdhouses but the openings are the usual size. How should I take care of her? I wonder if she's lost? Thanks for any input. Phyllis

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-06-08
    That sounds like a very nice bird indeed. It is curious that it is so friendly, and that does suggest that it may be a pet as these birds become very affectionate as pets. But where it came from is anyone's guess. There is some good information on foods and feeding, as well as housing and more for these types of birds on the Dove and Pigeon Care page, that should be of some help.
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Animal-World info on Mourning Dove
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Anonymous - 2013-05-31
I found a mourning Dove about 5 days ago and it's wing was hurt i think it was shot by a bb gun. I brought him in my house a lil high strung and calm at the same time beautiful it is indeed. Sad to see people purposely hurting animals.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-05-31
    So nice that you are able to help the little thing:)
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Animal-World info on Diamond Dove
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Anonymous - 2013-05-14
Okay so I have a pair of diamond doves. I know one is male and one is female. But they have laid numerous eggs since I got them. And only one out off all the eggs ever hatched, but sadly I didn't really read up on how to care for the baby and it died later that night when I got home. But now none of the eggs ever hatch. Should I separate them for a while so the female can take a break from laying eggs. And they have two right now but only one has a vein in it. So I don't know what to do so they stay on it. I have a lamp on them so if they don't sit on it for a little it won't die. I need help

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-05-14
    These doves are usually pretty good parents, but they do need a good sized cage and an aviary is even better. They may just be young and still getting the hang of it. Two eggs are normal, and they should hatch in about 2 weeks from when they were laid, so you won't need to keep a lamp on it for too long. It is a good idea to give the female a break, and they may be better parents when you re-introduce them into the breeding set-up. Also, you can help by conditioning them with egg foods both during breeding and while they are rearing the young.
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Animal-World info on Ringneck Dove
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dddd - 2011-12-21
About a year ago a tangerine dove flew into our yard and my dad caught it and we kept him (I think?) as a pet. He's in a large aviary with budgies, a cockatiel, and a finch. He seems to have a liking towards my finch, he coos and bows to her and I was wondering if I should get another dove for him.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-12-21
    That would be more up to you. He sounds like he is happy but he would probably like one that is like himself.
  • dddd - 2012-01-02
    I did get another one, he seems way happier and wants to raise babies now :D
  • Audrey Delgado - 2013-05-05
    I have had a female ringneck for 5 months, and have just yesterday gotten a new one we believe is a male, the female is being very violent  toward the new dove and i am just wondering how to get them to share a cage?
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-05-05
    Sounds like the female is a little territorial, probably because she was alone and became comfortable in her cage. It's her home... and her safe place. Bringing in a new bird is great, but your best bet is to have a separate cage initially  so they can get to know each other. Familiarity is important for a friendship to develop.
  • Audrey Delgado - 2013-05-05
    Alright, thank you i will give it a try! she gradualy seems to become more and more friendly with our new dove
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Joy - 2013-04-18
Hi all! I have what I believe is a ringneck dove -- wild, with a permanently broken wing, but otherwise seemingly in perfect health. We tried initially to take him/her ('Peet') to our vet, but they would not see a 'wild' bird. I live in a really remote area, two hours from a 'real' town (just moved here in Dec '12). We are happy to keep and care for Peet (we have horses, chickens, cats, dogs -- all spoiled and loved), I just want to make sure this bird is not miserable and bored. Peet's in a rectangle cage, with several perches made of natural wood that he hops around on. Feeding parakeet seed, supplementing with greens, a tiny bowl of grit and a small glass bowl of fresh water (changed twice a day) is available for him. The floor of the cage is solid, lined with newspaper and a light coating of alfalfa hay. Tried the bird bath, he's not interested. Millet sprays and cuttlebone hanging in the cage. He's tolerant of us but obviously still scared of us a bit -- less so than other birds might be, I'm sure. Any suggestions for keeping little Peet happy and entertained are welcome! Thank you.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-04-22
    You are doing an awesome job! I have had ringneck doves and mourning doves that visit my outdoor feeder daily for several years. My experience is that if they get badly hurt, they go into shock and its really hard to get them to come back around and even start eating. So you should be very proud! You rescued a great bird successfully. They do take time to get comfortable with people up close, but it can be accomplished somewhat. Wild birds seldom develop the same level of trust that captive bred birds do, but with doves, they will often become quite tolerant. Good job again, and all the best to you both.
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Animal-World info on White Dove
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gordon - 2013-04-13
More than a comment; a question that perhaps you may be able to answer me, I would appreciate the help. I have a female white dove (smaller kind) with red eyes...she was lonesome for 3 months and yesterday I found a fantail male dove and I put the male fantail in the cage with my white dove and after observing them for a few hours I figured it would be ok to leave them alone for a short time but I heard some ruffling about and when I looked, the male was pecking on the female, giving her a wound on her neck...there was also a little blood on the newspaper on the floor, but no blood on the white dove, only a mark on her neck where she was pecked...I am afraid the bigger fantail male will kill the smaller dove if I leave them together...is this a posibility? Should I not put them together? I would hate myself if the male hurt the female more...will they get over it? Will they possibly become friends/mates? Thank you for any answers, comments...gordon.

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-04-13
    It sounds like they aren't getting along all that great right now. If I were you, I'd keep a VERY close eye on them and see if they start getting along better. I wouldn't leave them alone together overnight until there have been no more episodes of fighting. It is quite possible that they could decide to be friends and become mates. But, you will just have to wait and see and monitor them in the meantime.
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