Animal Stories - Golden-capped Conure


Animal-World Information about: Golden-capped Conure

   The Golden-capped or Golden-headed Conure shown here is only about four months old!
Latest Animal Stories
Christi - 2014-02-25
Hi I'm Christi, I live in South Africa and have bought a golden capped conure 3 days ago, I’ve named him Brody. He still looks pretty young, not all his feathers have fully developed (about almost a year?) but he's more than capable at flying. I've read that this kind of bird is very active and likes to move around a lot. When Brody is excited he walks from one side to the other on one of his sticks and also climbs around on the bars. But because I'm at work almost the whole day I can't really keep a good eye on him. But to me he seems a bit inactive. When I arrive at home he is mostly still and doesn't move around much. I try to spend as much time with him as possible when I get home. He eats fruits from my hand and doesn’t really mind me sticking my hand in the cage, but he doesn’t want me to try and do a step-up yet. Which is understandable since I’ve only had him for a few days. He seems curious enough and likes to try new foods. He is mostly quiet and makes crackling noises with his beak like he is cracking open a sunflower seed, but he doesn’t have one in his mouth. He also murmurs to himself softly and moves slowly when he does. Is this behaviour uncommon? Should I be worried that he is sick?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-25
    Conures are peaceful flock birds, but it sounds like yours may be bored and lonely. It helps to give them plenty of things to keep them occupied. Although they need 10-12 hours of rest each day, exercise and play are important activities for their physical well being and psychological health. I would suggest you focus on giving you Golden Capped Conure plenty of things to occupy his attention. Gnawing and climbing are great activities. Most conures will chew up anything wooden, so natural perches and fresh twigs from willow, elder, poplar, and hawthorn work well. Other great toys can be bells, ropes, swings, untreated leather, chew toys and ladders. They also love mirrors and shiny unbreakable objects.
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Sherry - 2012-07-07
Hello I just wanted to introduce myself. I have just adopted a Golden Capped Conure and a question is all of a sudden she is attacking my son (22 years old) everytime he trys to pet or have her go to him he was going to him - but now won't ?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-07-07
    Most likely the Gold Cap has decided that you are his/her mate and is attacking the competition.  Rather than your son trying to pick up or pet the Gold cap, have your son just be around him, talking, possible little piece of toast as a treat.  Make friends.  Usually the conure will 'allow' other members into the family and maybe just re aquaint your son to the Gold cap.
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Devin - 2003-08-12
I have a gold-capped conure. His name is chilly. He is very funny and loves to hang out with me. Chilly likes everyone but he doesnt care for them as much as me. Chilly likes to play with his toys and his mineral blocks. He tends to hate cudle bones though. chilly also likes to go under things such as blankets and my arm. I am glad to have him and I am hoping to get another conure. They are my favorit type of parrot.

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  • Dawn - 2010-09-16
    I have two gold-capped conures that i am selling. please contact me. asmith5192000@gmail.com
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Toni Meyer - 2012-07-04
Hi I have a 2 year old I was told that it was a male. How can you tell if it's a male or female?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-07-04
    The only 100% way to determine if it is a male or female is through DNA sexing.  You can purchase the DNA sexing kits in the back of the Bird Talk magazine in the classifieds.  A breeder would be able to tell you with about 75% accuracy whether it is a male or female by the shape of the head.  The males head is flatter and the females head is a smooth curve from the eyes up and over the top of the head to the neck.  The males head just looks flatter from the side.  Other than that, if it ever lays an egg - it is a female.
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Sandra - 2013-02-20
We have a pair of gold cap conures that have laid one egg this week. Last year the proven sexed female (the other we think is male) laid three eggs but they broke. Now while she is nesting on this egg she frequently chirps for long periods of time. Is this normal? Is this a sign she is sick? Should I be worried?

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Ramdhan Cindy - 2012-05-17
Hi my name is Cindy. I just got a 3 month old Golden -capped Conure as a mothers day gift. I been trying to bond with him. He won't let me touch him. Everytime I try he bites my finger. I try takin him out of his cage he won't budge. I left the door open he still wont come out. I don't know how to aproach him so am asking if anyone has any tips on how to train him. It will be greatly apreciated thank you. I need help.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2012-05-17
    First you have to get him out of his cage but don't put your hand in the cage to get him out. Put his food and water outside the cage. You can pput millet or pieces of apple outside the cage. He will come out. Once he is out just talk to him, sing, laugh act nutty do whatever so he realizes you aren't scary or a threat. Eat with him - start feeding him with your hand something like cheerios. You now have him out of his cage and you can feed him with your hand --- here comes the hard part. Make a fist and see if he tries to bite the back of your hand. No way can a bird bite a tight fist - keep your thum down. Let him get used to doing this and realize it does not bother you but it doesn't hurt him either. At this stage you can try and just have him get up on your hand. You are relaxed as you realize he can't hurt you with the bite on your fist and he is relaxed cuz he realizes you aren't going to hurt him. If that works then you are home free. If you try this and stillnot comfortable or doesn't work then here's the really hard scary part -- just pick him up - just pick him up. If you think he is going to bite, put a towel over him and pick him up in the towel. Now hold him - he might be in a towel but just hold him. Uncover his little head and slowly pet the top of his head. Hold him close to your chest so he can hear your heart beating. This process could take a few weeks so go slow - real slow. It is more important that you learn the birds body language than it is for you to go fast.
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Heather - 2009-04-16
Hello,,we'd like to introduce ourselves. I'm the mama to a wide variety of medium birds,,,three Jendays,a mated pair and 1 offspring;2 male greencheeks,little man and betty ,who was supposedly a female ready to mate,and 2 gold capped conuers,beanie and her new mate cecil,who we waited 4 years to find.Aso owned by 12 cockatiels,9 of which were born in our home;2 love birds[rescues] and 2 female finches.except for the 'tiels most of my babies were given to me by people who no longer wanted them! I wouldnt trade these babies for much of anything and can't understand someone who does get and get rid of pets of any kind like they were just things to own.
2009-4-15

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anna - 2010-03-31
Hi I just got a conure, he has an orange mask and a green body with a blue tail. He seems to be taking to everyone else but me. He is also grinding the bottom of his beak against the top. What does that mean?

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Elizabeth - 2009-11-25
I have acquired a golden capped conure and he seems to have adapted quite well,he is around six years old. However, he bit one of my sons quite badly in the corner of his mouth while sitting on his shoulder. Could this have been jealousy? I've only had him a couple of weeks and he does like me and sits gently on my shoulder all of the time.

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Lyle Camier - 2009-08-11
I have a Conure as well as an Eastern Rosella, 2 Lutino Cockatiels and 3 Budgies and I'm convinced, the Conure is part monkey. You have to own one to understand that statement.

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