Animal Stories - People Talking About Cockatoos


Animal-World info on Rose-breasted Cockatoo
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suraj - 2011-11-29
Hi I wanted to know about rose breasted cockatoo baby and the price too

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-11-29
    Rose Breasted cockatoos in the United States purchased directly from a breeder usually run around $1300.
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jay - 2009-12-11
wheres the best place to get a galah in adelaide australia for the cheapest price cheers

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-08-18
    They Rose Breasted are native to Australia and frequently (most of ther time) are considered a pest - and possibly rightfully so there. You shouldn't have any problems getting one anywhere in Australia and a very low price - well at least a fairly low price. Breeders must have them - I think they run about $300 there.
  • stacy - 2011-11-28
    They have 2 at ANIMAL ATLANTA, BELLS FERRY ROAD, WOODSTOCK, GA. I go there alot and actually play with the 2 ((: they were hatched and hand fed there so they are very sweet and playful
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Animal-World info on Goffin Cockatoo
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Eileen - 2011-11-17
Hi. I watched the 'Petkeeping with Marc Marrone' and he mentioned of Goffin Cockatoo. When I was watching it, it made me wonder if I am too old to get this bird and what is its life span will be. Because I am in my 40's and I do not know if I can still get one and also not sure if it can be a service animal due to my Aspergers and I am also deaf as well. Just curious as I already have three animals, two dogs and a rabbit. :-)

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-11-18
    Goffins life span is around 50 - 60 years and they (as most cockatoos) require a lot of attention. Without attention, a great deal of toys and much companionship, they have a tendency to pluck. I have never heard of a parrot being trained as a service animal and although they are extremely intelligent and can be trained to do many things - I don't think they would be as dependable as many of the service animals need to be. Possibly their size and dexterity would be a good reason.
  • Eileen - 2011-11-21
    Ok. Thanks for your input. Your information really helps.
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Animal-World info on Umbrella Cockatoo
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mollie - 2011-10-09
My umbrella cockatoo is named ella she will be 1 in November, I used to get her out for 3 hours everyday and now I've grown up I barely get her out at all, I'm starting to get her out but she is screaming now in her cage! What can I do!? Help!

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-10-10
    Most parrots but cockatoos more than any others NEED attention. They crave attention and demand it from their humans. They are very social and to them you are their whole world. You are their flock, their mate, their friend. They are about equivalent to a 3 year old human chikd in their need to be with their human. You can spend time with your Ella while she is on her perch and you share your supper with her - or your breakfast. You can spend time with her watching TV. You need to spend time with her providing attention and playing. If she doesn't get the attention she is going to pluck, she will keep screaming and will probably be very depressed. You need to decide to devote the time for Ella - for the next 50 years or so --- or to find a suitable home for her. She is young, tame and wants to be loved and there should be no problem finding a new family for her but she can't be stuck in a cage without socialization and companionship. It would be like putting yourself in solitary confinement. Ella knws you are home and will make big noises to get your attention. She is calling her mate her flock. They just can't take isolation.
  • Anonymous - 2011-11-20
    Take her out.
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Joshua - 2011-10-16
What is the wingspan length of an umbrella cockatoo?

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-10-18
    An umbrella runs about 18 inches in length with a wingspan of 24 inches. They need a large cage - large enough to spread their wings and stretch. They sure like to play a lot with their toys and are quite active. They love their humans.
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Animal-World info on Mollucan Cockatoo
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Neil - 2010-09-14
I was wondering what the comfort temp is for a Mollucan Cockatoo? I've just became a proud owner of a beautiful mollucan cockatoo named Miestro. My
family and I are just in love with him and I think the feelings are the same back.

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  • jim - 2011-10-15
    i also just got one i was told 70 degrees
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Animal-World info on Goffin Cockatoo
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kacyliew - 2011-10-13
I had a goffin too. Three years ago I moved out of my landed property where it was allowed to move along a long bamboo placed in the garden to an apartment. At the apartment, it was left unchained on the balcony on a T shaped clothes bamboo holder that allows it to look out on to the greenery and tree tops as its 12th storey high. One day, it was attracted by some other wild parrot and later flew down to the tree top. As it was captive for sometime, it could not fly very steadily but landed on the tree below. We went down to the car park where the tree was grown to try to
persuade it to come down but to no avail. It spent the night perched on the tree. Next morning, we went down to check and that poor fella, hungry and
lonely flew down to land on my maids head. The maid regularly fed her and there was this bond established so it chose to return to her.
Goffins are affectionate towards their handlers and its a pity that I had to give it away because I felt unreasonable to keep it at a limited space environment. Now I want to buy a yellow crested cockatoo. Any suggestions where I can get one baby bird at a reasonable price??

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Animal-World info on Umbrella Cockatoo
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Dave - 2011-03-14
I'm excited because I'm getting a 15-year old Umbrella Cockatoo this week. For most of her life, she'd been abused by her female owner, and as a result she doesn't like female Humans. I've been visiting her at the Pet Store a couple times a week over the last month, and she seems to be warming up to me more each week. The noise of the pet store (mostly puppies yipping) seems to wear her down. I want to give her an environment where she can be comfortable. She's a sensitive girl who has seemed depressed; sometimes when I've arrived at the pet shop, she's on the floor of her cage with her head in the corner, and it breaks my heart to see her that way. But the last time I was there, she climbed my onto my hand and was playing; her crest was fully extended as she was gently hitting the palm of my hand. I have two main questions...(1) Many afternoons I'm away from the house, so I hope that my being with her in the mornings and checking in at night will be enough for her. Will it be? (2) Is there a chance someday she'd be comfortable with Women? I don't have anyone special but who knows what will happen in life. But I want my house to be a sanctuary for this bird. I want her to be happy. Her name is "Sweet Pea" and if she can live up to her name even Half the time, I'll be happy.

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  • Jerry - 2011-05-13
    I was doing exotic bird rescue before my divorce in 2009. One of the first was Romeo, a 5 year old male Umbrella Cockatoo. Although it took about 3 months because of past abuse, he finally stepped up to me. We have been best buddies ever since. I have discovered that female Umbrellas seem to want male humans as their primary handlers and vice-versa for male Umbrellas. Romeo still loves the women in his life, but he always knows who is best buddy is. I expect the Sweet Pea will chose you as her primary friend and protector. I am sure though that once she warms up to having a female human around, she will eventually accept that female into the family as well. It will take time and patients
  • Charlie Roche - 2011-05-13
    Yes, being there in the mornings, sharing your breakfast, playing with her or watching TV with her will be enough. She will get used to your routine and look forward to it and you coming home. Just make sur she has plenty of things to entertain herself with - toys and chewies. Mine have their own TV and movies - sound snuts but they really get into Kung Fu Panda and Surf's Up. She may or may not like another woman around. It doesn't rally make a great deal of difference. Sweet Pea is not going to dive bomb a lady friend or chase her around the house. Sweet Pea is just not going to want the lady friend to pick her up etc. It may change but frequently birds attach themselves to one person anyway. A cockatoo is not a dive bomber so I wouldn't worry about it. My cockatoo does not like my husband and my husbands grey does not like me. It isn't a problem. It would be nice if she accepted your lady friend but may not happen so just don't worry about it.
  • Derrick - 2011-08-03
    This is not necessarily a "not-to-worry" deal. My cockatoo Penny was previously owned and abused and does not trust men (with the exception of me for some reason). He knows my work schedule and spends most of the day screaming until I get home and he sees me. Another reason this may be a concern is when cockatoos roost,they call their flock together much like parents telling their children bed time and good night.

    Maybe Penny is an exception,maybe Sweet-Pea might be the exception,but a good 70% of behavior is determined by early training and the bird's personality.
  • Julie - 2011-08-31
    My 12 year old Cockatoo, accepted me a few weeks after my husband died. Freddie was his bird. Now, I have remarried after 7 years and Freddie has now accepted my new husband, but he worked at it. He's is the one who cleans his cage and feeds him every morning. She still screams a lot when I am on the phone or if I don't come running into greet her if we've been out of the house, but she's a loving, sweet pet. Of course, my two dashhounds, and cat know enough to stay clear of her beak. She loves to travel we take her in her cage in our camper van when we go on vacation trips.
  • Charlene - 2011-09-29
    Thanks for re-homing a 'used' bird!! My first parrot was abused and came out of it really really well, even accepting a man into the household. Your best course of action when you take her home is to keep strictly to a routine. We humans tend to want to lavish tons of attention/affection on our new friend up front and then we slack off as our regular life intrudes which causes confusion for the parrot. A routine is as much for your benefit as hers. They like structure. So, breakfast every day, then shower (my birds bathe with me) then back to her cage with toys for x amount of time. Passive interaction where she's nearby on a stand with something to do as you watch tv or read, etc. is just like flock behavior - together but not always touching. Of course cuddle time is essential, or play time if that's what she wants. My U2 sometimes just wants to be on me a while and she'll preen my hair as I read. Other times she's into everything to see if it's a toy. Anyway, my 4 birds were trained to expect breakfast daily, showers a couple times a week and then my absence at work 8-12 hours every day. They knew when I came back I'd cook dinner and then we'd all sit down to enjoy it together. Play time and snuggle time were generally for the evening as well. Now I work at home and they know that for 8-10 hours I will be unavailable and at the end of that time, it's Bird time. Yes, they'll scream if they think I can be convinced they're in mortal danger - thank goodness for earbuds. Ignoring them really is the only thing I've found to work.
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Nikki Van Court - 2011-09-22
FYI.. it is us Humans that make these birds aquire the behavior issues like screaming and acting infantile in their later years.. TEACH them to be birds and allow them to be birds and DO NOT over bond and the relationship and home will be HAPPY BETTER AND QUIET...

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-09-23
    Many people do not realize a birds typical behaviors and essentailly train the bird to do some peculiar and unwanted things. A young bird uses it's beak to balance until confident it can stay upright and balance. It doesn't want to fall. It isn't a bite and doesn't hurt - just using a hold with the beak. People jump up and down and get scared and the bird thinks this is play. Many times humans will teach the bird this is play and then the play or hold gets too rough. Basically we teach the bird to bite as they think funny. Eating dinner in front of the bird - hey a person is eating in front of a 3 year old. Chewing on our fingers - hey they are playing and humans should have toy in their hands to play. Tug of war is great with a sock but not with fingers or our clothing. Their is sometimes agression but bird postures for that and we need to read the body language. Humans need to understand sometimes we just have a headache too. Humans need to try and understand our language too. Thank you for you rpost and insight,
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Animal-World info on Goffin Cockatoo
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kristin - 2011-09-19
I recently got a female goffin named cookie. I was told she was under 10 and I wanted to get a male for her I've heard that if I had a pair that they would get mean and unsociable. I don't want that so does anyone maybe have a pair that could shed some light onto that rumor or keeping them in sperate cages or the odds that they would bond and not hate each other.

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