Animal Stories - Yellow-naped Amazon


Animal-World Information about: Yellow-naped Amazon

   The Yellow-naped Amazon has just about the best reputation a pet bird can have!
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Renny - 2014-04-08
After the baby yellow naped hatches and you remove the baby about 3-4 weeks after to hand feed, will the pair mate again and lay some more eggs? Or do I have to wait until the next breeding season? I feed a pellets diet. Can I continue feeding the pellets diet to the parents after the baby hatches or do I have to feed dry extract food powder?

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2014-04-12
    They might lay more eggs if it is still warm out and feels like breeding season. But most likely they will not and will only have a single clutch during this breeding season. If the pellet diet has sufficient nutrients you can continue feeding it. You may want to add in some fresh fruits and vegetables to make sure and to give them some variety!
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shelley witherell - 2014-03-26
I recently adopted a 10 yr. old male yellow naped amazon. When I first met him he would go to anyone. A day after I brought him home my 10 yr. old daughter was holding him on her arm, I put my arm out and told him to step up and he came after me and bit me. Now whenever my daughter is home and has him out I have to go in another room. He will even try to attack me if he is on top of his cage. He comes down the side of his cage and hangs off of it like he's going to fly and attack me. What can I do?

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  • Cathy - 2014-03-29
    OMG Shelley I am going through the same thing. It has been horrible and I am trying to figure out what to do. He loves my daughter and step daughter, but wants to attack me. I can't be in the same room if he is out of his cage. I will keep you posted on my progress, I am currently going to ABA Bev Penny's Way and Crazy Bird Ladies on facebook. They are a great support and free information. Check them out its free info. Good luck to both of us!
  • shelley witherell - 2014-03-31
    Today I decided to let my yellow nape out of his cage and my daughter put him on the floor and he found me and attacked my feet. I'm glad I had shoes on. I tried to give him a light tap on his beak with my shoe and told him no but it didn't phase him a bit, he kept attacking. I went to acks exotic pets and the owner said that the bird was hormonal this time of year based on his age and that it would pass in a month. But he also said that my daughter was the birds 'girlfriend' and that may never change.
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Zoe Barkel - 2014-02-25
I have a 10 year old yellow naped amazon parrot called Charlie. I have had him for 4 years and he has always been no bother for me but recently I have moved back into my parents house with him and at meal time he has become extremely greedy even though he gets food the same time we eat and he eats the same food as we are eating. He still screams how do I make him stop ...? And Charlie has never liked men since I got him, he will tolerate my dad but will not entertain my boyfriend.  Is there any way to make Charlie like men a bit more ...?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-25
    It sounds like Charlie is dealing with a disruption in the lifestyle and relationship he had come to depend on with you. Thus at meal times, with the new 'flock', he's asserting himself by being greedy. Screaming, again this could be a reaction to the new environment as well. As far as liking men, some parrots simply prefer females and other males, and they usually don't change their minds.
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doris - 2013-11-17
We got our bird in June 2013 he speaks says Momma -Dont Go -Hello but sum times not very clear what can I do to help iimprove His Words So I xan understand what he is saying

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Constance - 2009-11-14
I have had my Yellow Nape for 24 years and of course my husband and I are part of the flock. However, she loves all strangers unless she senses they do not like her. Yellow Napes are very intelligent and very high social as most birds because they are flock animals.

No one should have a Yellow Nape unless they understand all the needs of this very beautiful and special bird. Yellow Napes love to be held and allowed to have 4-5 hours of play time daily if not more. With a good diet, clean and I mean clean cage, and lots of social time with the family the Yellow Nape is a joy to have as a family member. Yes, they need to be a member of the family for ever. They do not adjust being moved around with different people like a cat of dog. Especially, Yellow Napes they are very smart, loving and bond for life. They can die of a broken heart.

Usually, if a Yellow Nape is biting and displays behavior problems the bird has been mis-treated or simply handled wrong.

Parrots do not bite unless scared and they just want to be loved and handled correctly. There are many rules to follow when handling a parrot.

I must say our bird has been so loved and is so happy in captivity she really is so sweet.

I have been working with birds for thirty years and they are very special animals that are misunderstood many times.

For anyone who needs to find a good safe place for their bird you can contact:
Phoenix Landing in Asheville, North Carolina, they are a parrot care foundation and they will adopt and educate others before allowing a bird to go to a home. Their phone number is 828 251 1333.

If this number does not work you can look them up on the internet and with a bit of time contact these people.

Thank you
Constance

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  • Mariette Coetzee - 2013-09-12
    I have a question.  I have a Yellow Nape Amazon came to us about 2 years ago. Do not know his background only know we are the third family in his life time and we think he is about 10.  Sad I know but he found a home for live. In the beginning we could handle him with no problem and then he started having behavior problems like biting us and shows aggression towards me when i move around his cage.  He will sometimes come down from his cage to the floor and if he sees me will come towards me with aggression. Now somebody told me he is sexualy frustrated.  Is that the case and what can I do to help him.  I would be greatful for any help.
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-09-12
    It does sound like your Yellow Nape Amazon seems to be distressed, which is a common occurence with these birds as they get older. Many times they really do best with a mate after a few years, it is actually suggested that people plan on getting a companion eventually. These birds are known to get really frustrated over time if kept by themselves, especially those who aren't closely bonded to a human that can spend exorbitant amounts of time with them.
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koko - 2010-09-18
Hi dears
Please how can I know the age for bird (yellow nape) because I have one but I do not know how old it?



hamedq84@yahoo.com

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  • Lynne - 2013-03-17
    Perhaps an avian vet could give you an idea, but after 3 years old, it's pretty hard to tell the age until they're over 50. LYNNE
  • Barbara Homewood - 2013-04-14
    I don't have a reply I need HELP. I read all the articles and thought maybe you would have a suggestion. We have a cockatoo who is the love of our life...we had an Amazon that died and we were heart broken. Well yesterday we got a Red Lord Amazon and she (we think her name is Peggy) won't hardly allow me to touch her. I have got to get her to get on my hand by coming in behind when my husband is holding her. She LOVES him to where she will get off her cage already to walk to him. I am around these birds all the time as I work from home... I am her care giver but she lunges and shows signs of aggression when I go near her, any advice that can help me with this?
  • Clarice Brough - 2013-04-17
    Koko, unless the person you got the bird from knows its age... it will be a mystery forever. Birds just don't have any physical indications of age.



    Barbara, it sounds like you have a 'patience & love' scenario on your hands. Birds don't just love us because we want them to... we have to earn it and give them a reason to respond... usually lots of 'patience& love'... good luck:)
  • Daylan - 2013-05-13
    Barbara, Try removing your husband from the birds interaction. This will force it to interact with only you and may help you gain it's trust and affections faster. It may be the bird is just partial to men, perhaps it was owned originally by a man, who knows. Either way, by making sure you are the only one interacting with it until it comes to you with ease will be a key part in its retraining. Good luck!
  • Daylan - 2013-05-13
    Koko...check to see if it has a band on it's leg. The breeder info should be on that along with the year it was hatched.
  • Anonymous - 2013-07-31
    HI Barbara, the Red-Lored Amazon is normally very sweet natured and friendly. Give this one time, LOTS of time. keep interactions casual, friendly and offer treats. The birds do not transition quickly, you just need to be patient! Birds will grieve for former owners and other birds. Just give 'em time, and yourself as well.
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Tim Calahan - 2008-01-31
I have had my YNA since he was 16 weeks old, visiting him weekly with the breeder. He is now 15 years old. I followed my breeder's instructions intoducing him to many people. He knows many of the neighbors in my condominium building, I don't allow him to be handled by my neighbors, but he is great around them when we are in the laundry room. I also have introduced him to friends, and he will go quite readily to them. YNA are quite loud, but that is typical of larger parrots in general. A YNA should be owned by people who enjoy being home, and are true animal lovers. They take time. think of them as perpetual two year-olds. I have never regretted my decision in purchasing Clyde. I think of him as my child.

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  • Lynne - 2013-03-17
    I agree. These special birds need a lot of attention, and time and they must be carefully socialized, but if properly socialized and sensitively handled, and recieve the attention and stimulation they require (they are phenomenally intelligent, and are easily bored), they are wonderful companions. They are very special though, and MUST be treated with care, love and respect. They are not domesticated by are a tame wild animal of incredible beauty and intelligence. My Pepito (AKA JC) is the most loving and devoted animal friend I've ever had!
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Suzy Wiberg - 2009-10-27
We have had a yellow nape, Salty, for 28 years, ever since he was a baby. He has gotten very mean over the last few years. I am the one he loves, and yet, now when I'm petting him, he pretends to like it and then, all of a sudden, he bites me horribly. He has also discovered that we get very annoyed when he makes a certain sound at regular intervals over a long period of time, so he loves to do that. Recently, when I let him out of his cage, he attacked our dog, and they got in a big fight with no one hurt. He also chases my husband when he's out of the cage, which is pretty funny! Basically tho, no one can stand him, and we don't know what to do with him. My husband called a parrot haven, and they said they don't take yellow napes. Also, I'm told he won't do well in a new environment. We don't want him to suffer, and we don't know what to do!!

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  • daleanna - 2010-03-05
    Hi suzy,
    My family and I have decided to get a bird, it looks like an Amazon so far.
    I see you've had your bird 28 yrs! Is it possible that the house is quieter since kids are grown and therefore more bored? I'm asking cause we have 3 kids now, 17 yrs, 15 yrs and 6yrs, and I am hoping all the action would be enough stimulation but don't know what to expect years ahead. I have never owned a bird although I know they take time and LIVE LONG. Please tell me anything you can as I am soaking all info right now. Oh by the way, I love the part where the bird attacks the dog as I have been worried for the bird all along. The only thing I'm worried about now, is wrecking my husbands hunting spanial! Lucky he's an outside dog.
  • maria - 2010-04-24
    I adopted one from someone and he is doing very well with me he even learned how to speak spanish now he is bilingual, maybe someone will adopt your parrot I love mine he is my baby.... if you are willing to give him to someone who will provide him with a good home let me know..
  • Scott Daniel - 2010-06-29
    Suzy I don't know if by now you have been able to take care of the problems with your YNA but you might try a fellow by the name of Chet at
    www.birdtricks.com. I have had Fatima for almost 40yrs and she really likes no one but me. Anyway check this guy out and see if he can help you.


    Scott
  • laurie - 2010-08-07
    Have you taken her to the vet and had a work up done? My yellow nape was getting a little crabby. Eventually we figured out that she had a thyroid condition. Now she takes a pill in her water everyday and she is back to being a sweet little girl...for the most part...she is an amazon after all. The vet can also give meds to help with other hormone problems which will help with behavior.
  • zehra - 2011-02-11
    I really admire your patience and love for your parrot. Yes, some parrots do change their behavior when they get old and many people can not tolerate their noise and bad behavior and then these poor guys passed from one owner to another which I believe makes their lives miserable and finally they end up in the sanctuaries. I hope you would never treat him like that! He has already given you his best 27 years of life now it's your turn to take care of him! Please don't give up on him. My advice is that you should put harnesses on him and let him fly every day for a couple of hours because this is the only thing he doesn't have and you will see a dramatic change in his life. My best wishes for all of you.
  • Christina - 2011-05-12
    Hello. I too have a yellow nape. My bird does the exact same things you described your bird as doing, I had to laugh. I could take your bird off your hands if you are interested. Although I know these birds don't take to each other I would have to keep them separate.
  • Anonymous - 2013-03-17
    Hello there! It is a good possibility that Salty need to go see the vet for a check up. He may have a minor problem that is making him feel out of sorts. My Blue Front, Tinkerbell became progressively nastier all of a sudden, and it turned out that she had a touch of gout in one of her feet and was very very uncomfortable. (I got mad at her one day and yelled at her 'What IS your problem!!!???? and she raised her foot up and I could see it was swollen and ulcerated). Boy did I feel terrible! A little bit of medicine and a change of perches and diet, and she was my sweet baby again in no time. Even something as simple as being tired, or being dusty, dirty or a diet change can throw them off. Please get Salty checked out. I don't think he's being malicious or is trying to annoy you. He may be sick, unhappy or uncomfortable, and just having a hard time telling you what's wrong. Hoof luck!
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ross - 2009-05-10
I read this description and it couldn't be farther from the truth. Yellow-Naped Amazon parrots are very mean and aggressive towards everyone except their owner (whom of which they bond a little too closely with). My mom has owned one for 28 years and he is one big jerk. If you step out of the room for so much as 30 seconds he will start yelling loudly (literally yelling) and will do so all day long until you come back. But get too close and he'll go on the attack. And when they bite is it is the most painful thing you'll ever experience. Their beaks are very strong and they can easily bite your finger almost down the the bone if they so happen to grab ahold of it.

The yelling may sound cute at first, but give it a couple of years and you'll soon be driven up a wall! My mom finally gave up and gave him to my Nana because she could no longer take the yelling any more. If you do not live by yourself and cannot afford to be around your bird at all times I highly suggest you pick something else as your exotic pet of choice. For as much as these annoying birds cost you could probably afford a tiger.

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  • Lynne - 2013-03-17
    Animals are like people. There are friendly, nice people and there are mean agressive people. Part of it is inborn, and part is a result of life experience. I have been Owned by 2 amazons, and while they both had very different personalities, both were sweet, and because I handled them gently, and treated them with respect, made sure that they had all they needed to be healthy, have their minds stimulated, and respected their intelligence and let them be the birds they were they were wonderful companions and would virtually go fearlessly and politely to anyone (even very young children). My YNA JC goes to nursing homes, and children's special schools and is as sweet as can be with everyone. Of course, if he's tired, or having an off day and perhaps not feeling well, because he's moulting or itchy, I wouldn't think of taking him to do pet therapy. Birds DO have noisy times (usually morning and sunset, and YES they will be very vocal for about 10 minutes once or twice a day, but hey, they're big birds, and they're hard wired to use their voice to communicate especially at sunrise and sunset when they begin and end their days. Birds RARELY bite unless they are in fear of their life, protecting their mate, or if they are being harrassed and can't remove themselves from the situation. That being said, if you tease or harass a parrot, or if you corner them you will be bitten... hard, and yes it hurts. I've had parrots for over 30 years and was only bitten badly once and that was because my Tinkerbell was frightened off her perch, and fell and broke her chest bone and I had to pick her up and take her to the Animal hospital. I didn't realize that her chest was badly hurt, and she bit me out of pain and fear. My JC bit my mom once and didn't draw blood, for the simpe reason that she was trying to play with him when he wanted to sleep. My dad and I warned her to leave the bird alone and after tolerating 15 minutes of good natured teasing by my mom (who the bird loves) he finally nipped her and said 'NO.... Go to BED!'. Are there birds who have been abused who can't be handled and who are so traumatized they'll bite at most anything... yes. for the most part though...parrots rarely bite and never without a good understandable reason (at least from their perspective). You probably should never have a parrot.
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ahmed - 2010-04-02
I just wanna know which one of these can talk more. Amazons, cockatoos or an african grey parrot?

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  • Editor's Note - 2010-04-05
    African Grey Parrots are known to be the best talkers, followed by Amazon Parrots. Cockatoos generally only learn about 20 - 30 words/phrases.
  • phillip - 2010-04-16
    A male yellow naped amazon talks the most, and will usally talk in front of anybody, where the african grey on the other hand will talk for it's owner sometimes, but when someone else walks in the room it will usually shut up. The cockatoo talks good but usually doesn't have a very large vocabulary "maybe about 50 words". Some of the yellow naped amazons have a vocabulary of 500+ words. So if you want the one that talks the most I recommend the yellow naped amazon. Mine started talking at about 4 months of age and is now a year and 1/2 and has a vocabulary of about 300 words. Keep in mind a lot of them learn new words & phrases quickly, even profanity.
  • Pat - 2010-05-19
    I have had all three and the clearest was the African Grey then the YN Amazon. It seems that the bigger Toos are better talkers. That said I loved my YN Amazon. He was the love of my life. A funnier more personable bird you would never find. My house was broken into and both my birds were stolen. The thieves were caught but my birds were never recovered. One of the boys said the YN died shortly after being stolen. Wouldn't eat and one day was dead. Radar (the YN) was my bird. He was terrified of men. Not too hard to understand---he was captured by men in his native home---transported by men and many of his group died nearly 50% on the trip into the states. Then nearly all pet store owners are men. He was a loving boy when with me. But, and this is important, I respected him and his intelligence. I did not expect him to "preform" on command. If he did not want to step up and come out that was ok. Somedays I don't want anyone to bother me either. We, I believe, had mutual respect for each other. Radar never bit me unless it was in play. And it was just a pinch then he would laugh like a maniac and run across the perch saying "don't bite, Radar, don't bite mom. It was a joke of his. He also nicknamed himself. Called himself Dar. Would say "peek a Dar" instead of peek a boo. Loved blonds even tho I am a brunette. He would flash and sing and prance for a red-head or blond woman. I miss both of my boys so much. They were with me over twenty years and I really loved them like my children.
  • Lynne - 2013-03-17
    All of those CAN talk. The Best are African Greys (although it can take over a year) followed by Amazons (Yellow napes and DYH are the best there although BFA's can talk too) followed by Toos and Macaws. That being said, if you MUST have a talking bird, buy a bird that you have already heard talk. Honestly, I've had 3 parrots in my life, and I would have love all of them just as much if they never said a word. Talking is the icing on the cake. The cake and the most important and charming thing about these animals is their intelligence, huge capacity for an intimate one on one bond, and their beautiful colors and fascinating acrobatics. It never mattered to me if they can talk. Remember, if they talk a lot, they're likely to also scream a lot! Sometimes you have to be careful what you wish for! LOL
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