Animal Stories - Amazon Parrots


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Zah Hosein - 2013-12-09
At what age should a double yellow amazon be ok to mate? I have a 3 yr old and he is showing signs.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-12-10
    Breeding age for Amazon parrots is approximately 3-5 years old.
  • fay lees - 2014-06-23
    we have 2 amazons one is 10 which dont talk and has got a bad habit of pulling her feathers out, my husband got her of a friend that couldnt look after her,we bought an other 1 which is a male who is 4, he talks alot(dont shut up).we been asking if the 10 yr old is to old to mate, some parrot experts says yes and others so no,has anyone ever mated theirs at 10 yrs old?
  • Clarice Brough - 2014-06-27
    Amazons reach sexual maturity at 4 - 5 years of age. Often around 5 - 6 years, it they don't have a mate, they will go through some teenage type behaviors for a year or more before settling down. They do best if they have a companion/friend in the same area, often with each in its own cage. They are not the easiest birds to breed, and  one of the biggest challenges in captivity is getting a mature pair to bond. Once they have bonded with a mate, they can breed from many years, (even beyond age 25), and healthy birds can live for up to about 50 years.
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margaret bennett - 2014-06-07
Have a 2 months old yellow crown parrot. Would like to know what can I give it to eat? We give her fresh fruits every day is that OK? And when could she start to eat seeds? Help us please.

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Animal-World info on Double Yellow-Headed Amazon
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Edwina - 2014-06-05
Hi, I have had my parrot for about 15 years and she is a wonderful pet. She has never bit me but others. Now she seems to want to squat and make little purring noises. Both inside her cage and out. We live alone. She has never been around other birds. She is very picky about her food too. Doesn't sing or talk like she used to. Please help?

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Animal-World info on Mealy Amazon
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Kim - 2010-11-07
Hard to believe the bird everyone is talking about is the same as ours! We have had our Mealy Amazon for about 15 years (she is 17). She is very sweet and loving but is a very loud screamer, actually more of a honker. We keep her with other birds in the family room because she screams less if we are around. She does not play much no matter what kind of toy we try. She doesn't seem very happy. Just curious if anyone else has seen these traits in their Mealy.

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  • Melanie Stewart - 2011-01-16
    Hi ,

    I have the same issue. I adopted a 3 year old mealy about 9 years ago and she will bite just about anyone, she is ok with my partner and will tolerate me. She was given to us due to the screaming and biting and the people that had her had a young child. About 2 years ago we adopted another mealy, he is about 5 now and is the nicest bird that I have ever handled. The female bird is wonderful with him, however she still screams the house down. We have tried everything from covering her and using a water pistol, none have worked. We have now resorted to removing her from the living room where they stay, to another room for 5 minutes, this seems to be working better, she hates not knowing what is going on and is always so happy to see you when you go to bring her back. Been doing this for about 3 months now and have seen lots of improvement .She still has her moments but the threat of the other room is working more.
  • alison - 2014-05-26
    Yes, my mealy is about 8, we are a safe house for him, fostering him from birdline, I couldn't part with him, he loves me, but soon as he sees my husband he becomes all unsettled and upset and starts screaming and honking. He has actually flew onto my husband a couple of times and beaked him! Wish I knew how to calm him down, have tried to allow him to bond with my husband, ie letting him feed him, but it just doesn't work, am wondering if he was mistreated by a man in his past life. Please help, any suggestions would be appreciated.....
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Animal-World info on Blue-fronted Amazon
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Ashley Gonet - 2014-05-07
I have had my Blue Fronted Amazon parrot since he was born out of his egg. We had his parents and they bred about three times. Jack was the very first born, his siblings are much bigger than him because he is literally a midget, (and I'm not kidding). We gave his siblings and his parents to a woman at a pet store called Bird is The Word in North Aurora, Illinois. He is eight years old and loves to talk, (in his own way because he doesn't speak). I have been teaching him to talk for all of his life, but he's just plain stubborn. He squawks at me for my food every time I am eating, and I think it is adorable every time he does. At first when he hatched from his egg in our kitchen he started to bond with my dad, later on I don't know what happened but now for some reason I am his companion for life. When he doesn't get enough sleep he gets a little moody, but when I come home from school every day he acts like I was going to leave him forever. I love this bird and I would recommend this type of bird to anyone wanting a companion, or a feathered friend that acts a little goofy from time to time.

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Animal-World info on Double Yellow-Headed Amazon
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angiepoo - 2014-01-02
Hi..we have a double yellow headed Amazon that a friend have to me a few months ago. She's around 8 years old and has a very extraordinary vocabulary. We spend a lot of time with her. She comes in and out of her cage as she pleases except for at bedtime when we cover her cage. She has a very large cage and lots of toys. She is fed well with a top of the line parrott food. We've done all the things that is recommended for parrots however, she won't let us hold her. She will occasionally go into my living room or on my counter and that's the only time im able to pick her up when she knows im taking her to the top of her cage. Anytime I go to pick her up from the top of her cage, she snaps and just moves away from me. Can anyone give me some advice on how to get her to let us hold her? When my friend owned her, she use to let people hold her at one time but when my friend started work and no longer had time for her, she spent alot of time alone. That's why she have her to me. I really want to hold her but I don't want to traumatized her. Any advice?? Thanks in advance. ;-)

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-01-04
    What a great new pet you have and it's good that you know how old she is. She has set behaviors that, as you pointed out, developed because of her previous circumstances. To change these behaviors, work with her regularly. Be consistent and offer reassuring words and treats, and eventually she should come around. There's no guarantee, but time, love, and patience are your best tools for success
  • Kevin Krause - 2014-02-17
    I ended up taking in my Brother's bird who passed away 2 years ago. I can tell you this bird has so many mood swings it is not even funny. I have been bit 4 times, one almost needed stitches. I am trying to figure out what to do at this point. We have been so good to this bird...but I am at my end. It screams if you are not in the same room. It's not good for either of us. But not so easy to get rid of. But I will tell you, don't expect a big turn around anytime soon. All I have read about the double yellow amazon, it is not a great pet, unless you have 24 hours a day to spend with it. Very little reward.
  • Ken - 2014-05-04
    Hi there I have two African greys and just got my double yellow head back after 5yrs. And he was hand reared, he spent 4yrs in a big cupboard, more like small room, not much attention and has not been out his cage for 3yrs now. Cupboard doors wese off but still not good. When I had him he was just 16weeks old and just over 1 when I gave him away. So I asked for him back when I heard and went to see him so I know his background. He attacks anyone near his cage and bites very hard. People have tried to take care of him but just not got a clue really, but they did try, he's still alive so am glad of that. Now the way I am going to go about it is leave him to come to me, give him treats, give him loads of praise when good, never award bad behavior, always keep him to your height. As when up high a bird is in more control of you, when same height you have more control over him. Amazons are very strong minded and I think about 5 onwards can hit sexual maturity and are very aggresive at this time. I will use a training perch for him to work with in a quiet room away from other birds, no distractions for him.You will also have to learn to read to your bird when he's happy, when he wants to be alone they do some things the same way. If he's getting nut tail spread out, eye zooming then hess happy but no nut and showing these signs stay away lol. He will need time just like my DYH time and patience and patience and patience and more patience lol it's only way to be. It will work out in the end, there is loads more I could say but hands on and that's the way to learn after a few bites I think we would all learn that's not working. Try different ways. Anyway am going on here this is just the things I have learned over the years so it may be diffrent from many other peoples points of view, it's just the way I would work. It always uses things he likes, I use my mouth, organ turn my back on him if he wants my attention he has to let me know, it's all to do with bond. Hope it works out for you, just don't forget DYH are full of it and have loads of character and bold and loads of charisma and are a handful to work with. They like to be the boss, you have to let them know who is but do it so it thinks he is winning but you are really getting him round to your way of thinking lol, if you know what I mean. Good luck and hope you have fun teaching new things and you get to hold him all the time one day. Please excuse my spelling and I am just a 46yr old man from countryside that has learned almost everything for myself am no expert but I do my best. Thank you, have fun teaching it has to be fun for both not a exercise good luck. Ken.
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Animal-World info on Yellow-naped Amazon
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Renny - 2014-04-08
After the baby yellow naped hatches and you remove the baby about 3-4 weeks after to hand feed, will the pair mate again and lay some more eggs? Or do I have to wait until the next breeding season? I feed a pellets diet. Can I continue feeding the pellets diet to the parents after the baby hatches or do I have to feed dry extract food powder?

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2014-04-12
    They might lay more eggs if it is still warm out and feels like breeding season. But most likely they will not and will only have a single clutch during this breeding season. If the pellet diet has sufficient nutrients you can continue feeding it. You may want to add in some fresh fruits and vegetables to make sure and to give them some variety!
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shelley witherell - 2014-03-26
I recently adopted a 10 yr. old male yellow naped amazon. When I first met him he would go to anyone. A day after I brought him home my 10 yr. old daughter was holding him on her arm, I put my arm out and told him to step up and he came after me and bit me. Now whenever my daughter is home and has him out I have to go in another room. He will even try to attack me if he is on top of his cage. He comes down the side of his cage and hangs off of it like he's going to fly and attack me. What can I do?

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  • Cathy - 2014-03-29
    OMG Shelley I am going through the same thing. It has been horrible and I am trying to figure out what to do. He loves my daughter and step daughter, but wants to attack me. I can't be in the same room if he is out of his cage. I will keep you posted on my progress, I am currently going to ABA Bev Penny's Way and Crazy Bird Ladies on facebook. They are a great support and free information. Check them out its free info. Good luck to both of us!
  • shelley witherell - 2014-03-31
    Today I decided to let my yellow nape out of his cage and my daughter put him on the floor and he found me and attacked my feet. I'm glad I had shoes on. I tried to give him a light tap on his beak with my shoe and told him no but it didn't phase him a bit, he kept attacking. I went to acks exotic pets and the owner said that the bird was hormonal this time of year based on his age and that it would pass in a month. But he also said that my daughter was the birds 'girlfriend' and that may never change.
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Zoe Barkel - 2014-02-25
I have a 10 year old yellow naped amazon parrot called Charlie. I have had him for 4 years and he has always been no bother for me but recently I have moved back into my parents house with him and at meal time he has become extremely greedy even though he gets food the same time we eat and he eats the same food as we are eating. He still screams how do I make him stop ...? And Charlie has never liked men since I got him, he will tolerate my dad but will not entertain my boyfriend.  Is there any way to make Charlie like men a bit more ...?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-02-25
    It sounds like Charlie is dealing with a disruption in the lifestyle and relationship he had come to depend on with you. Thus at meal times, with the new 'flock', he's asserting himself by being greedy. Screaming, again this could be a reaction to the new environment as well. As far as liking men, some parrots simply prefer females and other males, and they usually don't change their minds.
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Animal-World info on Lilac-crowned Amazon
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Anonymous - 2014-02-03
I have had my lilac for 14 years and he/she has been such a joy to have. Mine is very quiet unless he/she feels it's time to change food or water. When I first rescued my friend from an abusive owner there was no handling. I tried the glove approach boy was that a mistake! So I moved forward with a wooden perch to teach my lilac the step up routine. Still to this day I cannot just reach in the cage and and ask my bird to step up, he/she runs from me but if I stick the perch in there it isn't an issue, he/she steps right on it. I don't know if the previous owner scared my friend for life and now my feathered friend will always have trust issues. I am able to hold my bird if he/she is not near the cage. My feathered friend is very protective of me and will attack if he/she feels I'm being hurt. My husband and I were play fighting and my bird flew off the cage and attacked him and still to this day protects momma. I have my lilac in a very large cage with a double yellow nape and they are very good friends. With a little love and a lot of time you can train your feathered friend/friends but you have to be commited or a bird lover.

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