Animal Stories - Black Moor Goldfish


Animal-World Information about: Black Moor Goldfish

The Black Moor Goldfish is basically a black version of the Telescope Goldfish, though the eyes usually don't protrude as far as they do on the Telescope!
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Liz Schultz - 2014-09-15
I have had a Black Moor Goldfish for over a year now, and ever since I got it one of its eyes has been growing EXTREMELY larger than the other. It always freaked my out, but the fish swims normally and is healthy otherwise, so I let it go. I believe that the fish is blind in the smaller eye now - it is clouded over and shrunken.

Over the past couple of weeks, a growth has formed at the back of my fish's one giant eye. The growth grew to the same size as the overly large eye, so now it is as if there are two giant eyes on one side of its head, one behind the other - it's that big!

If you can believe it, the fish is still swimming normally and seems to have no balance or floating issues. I cannot find reference to a similar occurence with a goldfish ANYWHERE online!!! What is happening to my fish and how do I help it?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-09-15
    It's hard to say what it is, but there's a couple of possiblilities.

    It could be a tumor, which goldfish do sometimes get. Tumors can be internal or external, but the external ones are identified as lumps that are actually attached by a smaller thread, or sometimes multiple threads. They are sometimes have a bumpy cauliflower-like appearance or can simply be smooth but still protruding.  Unfortunately there's no effective medial cure for tumors and it's usually recommended to either remove the mass or euthanize the fish to avoid a slow death.

    Another possiblility is an ulcer, which start as a slightly raised scale that's usually yellowish looking, but can look clear or white. The area aroudn it becomes bloody and inflamed and the bump protrudes. Ulcers can be treated and must be treated right away. Maracyn 2 is one medication to look into as possible treatment.

    A third possiblility is Lymphocystis, which is the most common viral disease found in freshwater fish, it does effect goldfish, and is typically chronic. Also known as Cauliflower Disease, it is transmitted by viral particals in the water, usually introduced by another infected fish. Once infected a lump will form and enlarge until after about 4 weeks, when it will slough off and release viral particles into the water. The fish should be quarantined for at least a month. There's not really a specific treatment for Lymphocystis, but the fish should be treated for secondary bacterial infections and the lesions will eventually revert and the skin will be pretty much normal.
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Em.18 - 2014-09-15
Hey guys! I don't know if you can help me. I have three 4 inched Veil-Tailed black moors that I've had for about 3-4 years now. In this last month two of the three developed one white eye? And now one of those with the white eyes has suddenly got dropsy ans doesn't look like he is gonna make it... My 65 liter tank (about 14 gallons) has a 25% water change every week and a crispa plant is also added every week or so... They love eating it. They're fed every day on either frozen bloodworm, daphnia, or brine shrimp... I honestly don't know what I'm doing wrong? Tank is 22C. For now the one that looks like his gonna die (his name is dark knight) is in a slightly smaller tank with an air stone etc so I can dose him easier on his dropsy treatment. Any ideas?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-09-15
    Cloudy eyes are most often the result of a bacterial infection, though sometimes it can be parasitic. These diseases are usually related to water quality and poor diet. It sounds like you are diligent with maintenance, so try changing the diet to include variety and include foods with added vitamins. Perhaps start an antibiotic treatment on the main tank, a complete treatment usually includes administering the medication several times over a period of time, follow the manufacturer's instructions on the medicine. Continue with regular water changes weekly. Cloudy eye can lead to blindness, especially if the water quality and diet are not kept up with. Good luck to you and your fish!
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Karen - 2014-08-28
A black moor should NEVER be kept in a bowl, and should have 10 gallons per fish. Black moors do not grow to the size of their tank; they continue to grow regardless. Also, just because they are a hearty fish does not mean that they should be in dirty water. Goldfish produce a lot of waste so the ammonia level will rise in your tank if you don't do regular water changes. THIS CAN HARM YOUR FISH. Also, just a tip that isn't mentioned. If you have a large black moor and baby snails, the moor might eat your snails.

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rachel - 2014-08-18
hi i am just letting yas know that i had two of them black moor goldfish and one of them killed the other one so just be aware

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  • Karen - 2014-08-28
    That's really unusual. Black moors are typically non-violent, and should live very well with another black moor. Are you sure there wasn't anything else wrong with the other fish?
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RACHEL GREEN - 2014-08-15
I have fantail gold fish which is staying at bottom of tank and can onlt swim a little tries to go up but seem s like its to heavy to swim yo then top. It moves around the tank at bottom. Bit stays in same location for a long time then moves again. Could this be constipation or bladder disease? What should i do?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-08-15
    Lethargy is often cause by water quality, try doing a partial water change to see if that's the problem.
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Jerr - 2009-03-07
I have a 6 year old black moor goldfish who is the LAZIEST fish I've ever owned. He was originally in a little 5gal, and as he has grown so have his tanks. He ALWAYS has prefered sitting on the bottom of the tank. Probably because he manages to hurt himself when he swims. Over the years I have rescued him from the filter system (making one eye larger than the other), later from an ornamental log he was stuck in for a couple of days (making the other eye blind and blood shot). He is currently the size of my fist and is a brilliant gold/orange color with black tipped fins. He lives in a 105gal tank happily laying on his side on the bottom. He has 4 healthy fat tank mates who all swim normally, although my fantail will sit with him to keep him company, and from time to time you will see him haphazardly swim around for excercise. So I have chalked all this up to pure laziness, and PERHAPS a damaged swim bladder due to his near death experiences through the years.
I anticipate him being around for years to come. If anything, he makes for interesting conversation with guests.

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  • raye - 2014-01-21
    I have a black moor too that got herself in all kinds of trouble. Got stuck in her light house and damged her gills... she too was a bit lazy but I found if I give her 1 or 2 thawed frozen peas deshelled every day it gets her moving....good luck.
  • Mark - 2014-02-19
    I have a Black moor and when I woke up he was at the bottom of the tank so I came to the tank and he was still alive. So I gave him some food and then I relized that he is struggling to chew his food. I got a good look at his mouth and it's kind of stuck together. I will check him up and see if he is poorly or not also I will give a water check. Please have a solution for this problem and help my poor black moor.
  • BBP - 2014-08-13
    Actually my reply is for Mark who unfortunately is listed as a reply also and has a serious issue needing help. I see its been a few months so if you have an update please let us know not as a reply but a separate story/comment. My suggestion would be to see if your fish has anything trapped inside its mouth or see if its mouth fungus. Ive never had a goldfish have gravel stuck in its mouth but I am fighting mouth fungus on one and that stuff just will not go away! So Mark please give us an update and I hope its a happy one.
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Torren Sutton - 2014-06-25
Well I have a black moor and I have a comet goldfish but I don't have a filter for them. Will they die? I have water salt but will they die or not?

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  • BBP - 2014-08-13
    As I've sure you've read here, those aren't the best two types to have together but it can work if you pay attention to whats going on and stay on top of water quality, etc. I prefer the Moors, Telescopes, and fantails but I received a Comet as a gift. All I will say in answer to you question is that the likelihood of your fish dying sooner rather than later is raised exponentially without a filter. Goldfish are voracious eaters and produce a lot of waste. Waste turns into ammonia and other nasties, and the entire tank bio chemistry will be off. Fish need good clean water, space to grow and swim, and peace from more aggressive fish. Do yourself and your fish a favor and buy a filter, change the filter medium as directed, and also invest in an aquarium test kit. API makes several & I personally go to a store to purchase or use Amazon. Last bit of advice - read, read, read, as much as you can on their care and treatment. They are an investment both financially and for your time but the joy you will receive in turn is priceless.
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lynett shier - 2014-08-06
i'm so upset my black moore of five years + has disappeared in my tank it wasn't ill and i can't find it dead anywhere the other fish are fine would they have eaten him :-(

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-08-13
    So sorry to hear about your Black Moor. It is possible the other fish could have eaten him, but if it has been a compatible community tank, it most likely only occurred at night, and probably only if the fish had already died.
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Charmaine - 2014-03-08
Can a black Moore be with a Siamese fighter female?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-03-09
    They can be fine if the tank is large enough and there are plenty of hiding places. Plants, even artificial help to provide places for retreat.
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Hector - 2011-01-31
Hello! I have 2 black moors in a 17 litre tank. One of my black moors is staying under the log or in the bottom, Why won't he/she swim around?

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  • Jacqui - 2014-06-11
    Correct me if I'm wrong on this conversion, but I'm pretty sure 17 liters = about 4-5 gallons which is way too small for two black moors. I was always told to go by 10 gal per fish, so you would want to get at least a 20 gallon tank. The inactivity may be due to the stress of being in such a small space with another fish. Hope this helps!
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