Animal Stories - People Talking About Goldfish


Animal-World info on Veiltail Goldfish
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Jorge - 2013-01-21
Hello I have 2 young veiltails (about 6 cm) in a 18 L nano tank, it has an air pump and filtering by gravity (with activated carbon). Can I care for those fishes in that tank? Thanks!

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-01-22
    Two of these fish should be fine in an 18 Liter Nano Tank. The general rule is for every inch of fish you should have 1 gallon of water. These guys usually only get to be a little over 2 inches when full grown and so that tank should be just large enough to accomodate their full grown size. I wouldn't add anymore fish though.
  • JustMe - 2014-07-26
    Two fish of this type need at least 151L as they can grow 6 inches each and are huge waste producers.
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Animal-World info on Redcap Oranda Goldfish
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shimmy - 2014-07-26
Hello,

I know it's been a while since you posted this, but your fish probably has an ailment known as Swim Bladder Disease, a disorder that tends to affect Fancy Goldfish in particular. If your other Red Cap is exhibiting normal behavior and feeding activities, this is most likely the case. I highly recommend, should you intend on continuing to keep goldfish, to research the disease when you have time, as the following advice might make more sense.

For now, temporarily stop feeding and prepare a small amount of peas (yes, the same stuff we eat) by using plain frozen or fresh peas, rinsed and with outer skin removed. Softening might help with their intake, so soaking them to allow thawing or even boiling them slightly is okay. Goldfish should be fed 2-3 times a day - replace one of those feedings with a pea daily for the sunken one, or one each if you haven't quarantined (always a good idea) it already. Also, if you're using flake or freeze-dried feed it is generally recommended that you soak the food for several minutes with water prior to offering (freeze-dried should always be soaked prior to consumption), or consider switching to or alternating with a goldfish feed of the sinking variety.

As an added precaution, check the tank parameters to ensure they are within the ranges or levels that Red Caps prefer. If you have a tester or kit (a wise investment), double-check the numbers for all the usual things but pay especially close attention to Nitrate, high levels contributing to the cause of the disorder. If higher than normal, do a larger than usual water change and feed less.

A less likely cause of the disorder are intestinal parasites, which is hard to diagnose and probably not applicable to this situation. I'd still look up symptoms of intestinal parasites and see if the fish is exhibiting any telling signs of them in addition to sitting at the bottom of the tank.

Finally, I'd do a review of the tank to make sure that your fish are in the conditions that they thrive in, which can easily be forgotten or overlooked in the midst of other events and emergencies - especially over the long life of these fish. This would include keeping in mind that Orandas in general do not do as well as their slender-bodied cousins, such as the Common goldfish/koi, in colder or faster moving water, but still require a fair amount of surface movement at the water surface to provide that high oxygen level they require. Staying on top of tank maintenance and filter cleanings are always helpful, particularly in this case where such a sensitive body part is vulnerably exposed, and upgrading or expanding the various equipment as they grow/needs change.

Other General Tips: If you have high maintenance due to algae or other plant growth, consider moving the tank further from natural sunlight (basically, any windows) or electronics (TVs, computers), even reducing the amount of time the aquarium lights are on if you have any (timer recommended, 5-6 hours is plenty). Last but not least, make sure none of the decorations or even foreign objects are in the tank, have sharp or hard pointy parts (even those smooth ornamental displays can break to form dangerous areas), for the obvious reason! =P

Hope this helps! Email me if you need more help - fish illnesses is a tough topic, of which I am not an expert of nor am remotely qualified to discuss - but I'll do my best!

Just keep swimming,

shimmy

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Animal-World info on Shubunkin Goldfish
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RonRon - 2011-01-20
Need some info...how many shubunkin/comet can I put in my 3ft x 1.5ft x 1.5ft tank..? Thanks...

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  • Anthony - 2014-07-18
    In your 50 US Gallons you could hold 25.... try 10 and let them breed!
  • Sharon Jones - 2014-07-23
    I think 25 is far too much for that size tank they grow very big I have one in my 90 litre tank and a phelc my shubunkin is about 7" now ...two in there would be too many ...they produce a lot of waste ...there big fish ...Sharon...

     
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Animal-World info on Comet Goldfish
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brady - 2014-07-13
Fun, active, clean, hearty, colorful cheap fish.

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Animal-World info on Telescope Goldfish
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Brenda - 2014-07-13
I have two telescope Goldfish & was wondering if I can use well water & what solutions are best??

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    The advantage of using your own well water is there won't be any chlorine or chloramine, so it can work well without adding the typical water conditioners. However I would check the hardness range and make sure it's between 5 - 19 dGH. If higher or lower, you may need to adjust it.
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Animal-World info on Redcap Oranda Goldfish
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Roxy - 2014-06-17
I have two red caps, one does not eat any food that she likes, laying at the bottom all time. I don't know what's going wrong with her. I didn't see any white or spots on her body. Please advise me what should I do?

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  • Michelle Tellez - 2014-07-12
    We got a little red cap one week ago and for 2 days now she has done the same thing. Should we be worried?
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Abhinav - 2014-07-07
I have 5 orandas. One of them often sits at the bottom but eats well. There is no white spots. What is the problem? Please help.

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    These fish should be active and swimming around. Your Oranda could be sick or stressed, possilby due to water conditions... such as an inadequate filter and low water flow, causing low oxygenation. Another possibility is if the fish is a year old or older it could be full of eggs and not able to release them, in which case, hopefully the body will re-absorb the eggs. However, the best first thing to do is an immediate 20% water change and vacumn the gravel. Then follow that up with about a 30% water change everyday for the next three days. Make sure the temperature of new water is the same as the old, and that you add a water conditioner each time. Keeping the lighting turned off during this time can also help.
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Animal-World info on Comet Goldfish
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Katie - 2010-03-04
Just as this website explains above, comet goldfish require filtration and aeration just like other aquarium fish. They shouldn't be kept in bowls. A full grown comet will require a minimum of a 30 gallon tank. Even a small 1 inch goldfish shouldn't be kept in anything smaller than 2 gallons, and that's for only one comet TEMPORARILY! If you're really wanting to keep a fish in a bowl, I would recommend a betta. Although they actually prefer a warmer temperature (78-82 degrees F), they usually live at room temperature with no problem. They will not require filtration as long as you change out the water once weekly (make sure you are using "conditioned" tap or well water or spring water, and make sure it is at about room temperature so as too not shock the fish). Bettas are also different from most fish in that they do not require aeration. Bettas actually breathe from the air/water surface. Keep in mind, however, that you can only have one betta per bowl/tank. *If you get a female betta (shorter fins), you can sometimes keep more than one per bowl/tank, but keep in mind that should the fish begin to fight, you will have to have a second container to separate them.

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  • Gia - 2014-07-05
    Actually bettas are quite a bit more demanding than gold fish, they DO NOT do well in bowls they need at minimum a 1.5 gallon tank and 2+ Gallons is better. They need filtration and some time of temp regulator (heater). To put any fish in a bowl with out a heater and filtration is cruel and shouldn't be done. Source: betta breeder for 15 years.
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Animal-World info on Ranchu Goldfish
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twYANGzii - 2009-02-13
Ranchus are one of the most popular Goldfishes in Asia!
I am from SG, and I keep 3 of them in with a Lionhead and a Lionchu, they're all gorgeous and sweet!
Most Ranchus that've too short a tail and will do a headstand, but it's normal.
Love these Ranchus!

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  • Anonymous - 2014-07-05
    Glad to read that lionhead headstands and it is not bladder disease because mine can swim normally but they will headstand most of the times while she is resting.
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Animal-World info on Redcap Oranda Goldfish
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Cheyenne - 2011-11-26
I have a 55 gallon hexagonal tank with a medium sized redcap oranda goldfish her name is Puff. And I believe she has a fungal infection, but I'm not sure. I also have a Rexa XP4 Filstar filter. Please help.

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  • Charlie Roche - 2011-11-28
    Try Animal Worlds article on Fish Diseases and Symptoms Symptoms and look at symptoms. Also look at Fungal diseases. Identify which one (if any) your little guy has and the corresponding treatment is listed.
  • abhinav bhattarai - 2014-06-30
    Cheyenne, your red caps are suffering from a disease called white fungus. You should buy a medicine from the fish store and put a single drop in the water. If it does not work then you should keep your fish isolated.
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