Animal Stories - People Talking About Their Pets


Animal-World info on Desert Hairy Scorpion
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justin martin - 2011-02-27
Hi, I just bought a desert hairy scorpion, this is my first one. I was wondering Ibought it in small case it was in with the same original sand. I just wanted to make sure what I need to keep it healthy. What kind of light or a black light a gentleman told me, should I change the sand often, how much water is needed, if I need a bigger tank and with the food I see it eating two creeks, but the other one that was alive he stung and left it alone do I take it out and throw it out? Thank you for the help. justinT

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  • tom - 2011-05-05
    You should never use blacklight all the time. An ultraviolet miney checker type light is good to occasionaly look at your scorpion, but it is proven, that it is detrimental to their health. You will need a 2/5 gallon aquarium type vivarium (aquariums tend to be longer than tall, floor space is the key to housing) they are a ground dwelling species, that burrows from time to time, so mix reptile sand with a small block of coir (coco fiber) or potting clay, to give it a sturdy burrowing substrate, that won't collapse. You don't need to change the sand often, just remove uneaten/dead crickets, locusts and roaches. At the end of the year, do a complete overhaul. Move your scorpion into a small tub, that it can't climb out of. Rinse the substrate and other things and put it all back in.
    Also: feed him 2 crickets every week. Sometimes they go on hunger strike. Don't worry.
  • fakhar shehzad - 2014-02-07
    i have lot of gecko lizards and scorpio...i want to sell them plz contact me,,,fakhar_shehzad@yahoo.com
  • amir - 2014-07-04
    I've the same scorpion you need, if you want to buy it so contact me at this e-mail tommyrite@live.com
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Animal-World info on Spotted Green Puffer
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Megan - 2014-07-04
I have 2 green spotted puffer fish. One has always been smaller/ skinnier than the other. I fed them last night and the big one bit the little one. I didn't even see it happen because I was still dumping some blood worms in the tank and then looked down and saw a chunk of skin hanging off of his belly. Now that he has been grazing on the bottom of the tank - belly is gray in color of course - some blood worms are stuck in the wound! I don't know what to do! Do I catch him in a net and try to wipe the blood worms out of the wound with a q-tip or something?? Or will they fall out eventually? I feel so bad for him! I know these puffers should not even be sharing a tank but I rescued them from a friend and they have been fine for the 3 years I've had them. Any suggestions?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    Keep the tank water clean with regular water changes, and as an added measure put in some Melafix (a tea oil treatment that will aid healing and in preventing infection).

    You can treat the wound, not only to clean it but also to avoid bacterial or fungal infection from taking hold. Do this by netting the puffer and placing it on a towel or some paper towels. Take a cotton swab and wipe off the worms and debris. Then take another clean cotton swab, dip it in iodine, and dab the entire wound. Lastly put neosporin on the wound and then gently reintroduce the fish back into his tank.
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Animal-World info on Tortoise Shell Cats
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Lindust - 2014-06-11
We had a tortoiseshell cat Cali, she was 14 years old. We loved her sooo much and miss her a lot. I found her inside the grill of a jeep meowing for help on 6/2000 in a business parking lot where I worked. I rescued her and she was 9 weeks old. Cali had a ripped up chin and a virus in one eye which left her blind. We got her med help and she was good as new. We cherished her and she was grateful for her second chance in life. With time slipping by among the other cats we have ,Cali was 14 years old before we knew it. She'll always be my baby girl...she was feisty and independent but got along with our other cats. We enjoyed our tortoiseshell cat..she was a blessing to our life. till recently she had a tumor that couldn't be cured and within 2 months she had to say good bye. It was the hardest thing to have to go through at the vet that day. We are still sad but hope she had crossed the rainbow bridge...we love her so. Enjoy the moments with your kitties...time passes so fast with our pets. We would treasure our Cali and the memories forever. If only their lives were longer.......

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  • Anonymous - 2014-07-04
    Losing a pet is just as bad as losing a child. They become a part of your damily too. I hope time can heal your pain. Xoxo amber
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Kimberly - 2013-03-10
I have a Tortie from a rescue shelter, maybe 3 years old. She has taken to me quite well and has no desire to explore the apartment. She has claimed a fake fur blanket as 'her space' at the foot of my bed. She tries to be vocal with me as if we have our own private conversations. She used her food dishes and litter box without incident until we added another rescue cat to our family. She refuses to eat out of the same dishes or use the same litter box anymore, she won't even leave her blanket or her bed, growls, hisses and postures towards the happy go lucky kitty (less than a year old). Anyone know if this is the way it's going to be or if time might smooth things out? My Tortie, black and variegated tan, named Peka, seems rather possessive of me and behaves as a no nonsense, 'I Own the left side of the bed and my person'. I know a lot of this is still primary posturing as Peka has been here a month and the silly kitty has been here only a few days...they are both female, Peka is spayed and comes from a violent history, I'm sure trust will take time. Any advice out there?

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  • Jasmine Brough Hinesley - 2013-03-10
    I have had so many cats and introduced so many cats of different ages to each other. I would definitely say give it some time. As your one cat is an adult, she may need more time to become 'friends' or at the very least tolerate your new, younger cat. Sometimes they will become best of friends and start hanging out together. I would guess that your worst case scenario would be that they may not be friends, but they will probably learn to live with each other from a distance. I would give them separate food, water and litter boxes so that they feel like they have their own space. And see how things go from there.
  • diane - 2013-06-27
    Hi, I too adopted a tortie from a shelter, 4 yrs old, and she acclimated very quickly. She is very vocal (in a talkative way) so I named her squeaks. I also adopted another kitty, 1 yr tabby, that we picked up a week later because she was getting spayed. Squeaks does not get along with tabby kitty and attacks whenever she sees her. Although we have only had both for 2-3 weeks, I have been finding it difficult to figure out what to do as the tabby will hide for an entire day unless I find her. What I am trying now is keeping Squeaks in my room during the day and let the tabby roam the house to bond and get used to her new home without the fear of attack. I let Squeaks out at 5pm until bed and keep the tabby in the tv room with the door closed. I have not had any luck finding good info inline except the dreaded spray bottle when she attacks. I hope things change too as both kitties are great. Squeaks is such a love and very affectionate so I don't know why she has to attack the other kitty.
  • Shakespeare - 2013-10-03
    Just got a female tortie from rescue at pet smart. Her name is Juliet.. Juls for short..was told they don't get along with other cats which is cool for me because I live in an apt and it's just her and I. She is very affectionate.. Always in my lap.. On my bed.. A real joy I keep her litter clean and use pro plan cat food which she likes... Every once in a while then as a treat I will give her moist cat food.. Mayb once a week like Sunday. Also I love her color.. Very different
  • Stuart - 2014-01-17
    Mine is a question. We have a gray/black striped kitten and we're going to look at a tortie kitten at the shelter. My question is are tortie's difficult around other cats. I love my striped kitten and she needs a buddy and this tortie is female and after reading all of yall's comments I'm rethinking that maybe I should stay away from this type of breed. We're redoing a old Victorian house and I don't need a cat who thinks she owns the place and starts creating havoc everywhere and then doesn't want to be friends with our kitten. Can someone comment if things got better?
  • Meha Valdez - 2014-01-26
    Both of my kittens were freaks before I adopted them. My first one is a pure black that I rescued along with his two brothers that later became adopted. Onyx without his brothers became very needy and lonely and one day at Petsmart I saw Giselle. A beautiful tortie around the same age. I fell in love and brought her home. (They were both 4 months old.) At first she was very afraid always hiding hissing and fighting whenever Onyx tried to play. But Onyx wanted a friend so he never gave up on her and within about 2 weeks they were best friends. Its taken her much longer to get accustomed to humans then our cat. But now after about a month and a half she sleeps on my bed and forces physical attention. So yes there are good endings!!!



  • Meha Valdez - 2014-01-26
    Feral not freak*
  • Anonymous - 2014-07-04
    Not a lot of people want to deal with feral cats so I think it's wonderful you gave them a chance. I used to have a feral cat and loved him just as much as the other one. I wouldn't have my tortie now if I hadn't found her starving and only 6 weeks old. Now I don't know what I would ever do without her.
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Animal-World info on Neon Velvet Damsel
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Janet Haertle - 2013-10-01
I just started my first saltwater aquarium and I have different varieties. I have one that is not very active and sits at the bottom of the tank but what impressed me is the neon damsel is coaxing that little one to swim. The neon damsel floats down to it with its tail fin and gives it a little nudge to make it swim. I thought that was really neat. The neon damsel is trying to help it stay alive is what it looks like to me.

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  • rofer - 2014-07-04
    Try turning off filters before and some time after feeding. My damsels all stayed at bottom until I did this. If you have dominoes they're the toughest of any I ever had kept.
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Animal-World info on Ranchu Goldfish
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twYANGzii - 2009-02-13
Ranchus are one of the most popular Goldfishes in Asia!
I am from SG, and I keep 3 of them in with a Lionhead and a Lionchu, they're all gorgeous and sweet!
Most Ranchus that've too short a tail and will do a headstand, but it's normal.
Love these Ranchus!

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  • Anonymous - 2014-07-05
    Glad to read that lionhead headstands and it is not bladder disease because mine can swim normally but they will headstand most of the times while she is resting.
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Animal-World info on Abyssinian Guinea Pig
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Delores Moreau - 2013-09-06
I have an albino abyssinain guinea pig named Blizzard. He is about 3 or 4 years old. I have 2 other guinea pigs. They are all in separate cages. No matter what I do Blizzard always messes up his cage long before the others do. I think he is bored and so he plays with his water. The cage always gets really wet. I have replaced the bottle several times. I have tried many different things to keep him content. Is this behavior specific to this breed?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2013-09-08
    He sounds quite rambunctious and I'm inclined to think it's just the personality of that guinea pig.
  • No one - 2014-06-04
    I think your guinea pig is bored and he needs something to do so he plays with his water and well messes up his cage.
  • zoey howards - 2014-07-05
    Yes this behavior is specific to this breed. Abyssinian guinea pigs are often known for being mischievous and clowning around.
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Animal-World info on American Guinea Pig
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Lily Richards - 2014-07-05
Hi I'm Lily. I am only eleven and I really want to get a guinea pig. I have researched them and know how to take care of them because I babysit other peoples pigs. I am very sure I want to get one…. but I don't know which one I would like to get, American or Abyssinian? I would like them to be friendly and be okay with cuddling….but not super noisy or smelly. Have any advice? Please respond. ps: I am looking for a decent guinea pig cage for $15 or less…..anybody know where I could get one? Thanks for reading, bye!

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    Guinea Pigs are great pets, no matter what breed you get, and it sounds like you are going to be a good keeper for one. Check with your local pet store, guinea pigs are just about alway available, and they should have a variety to choose from. Pick the one that attracts you the most, just keep in mind that if it is a long-haired type, it will need regular grooming (which is fun too!).
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Animal-World info on Comet Goldfish
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Katie - 2010-03-04
Just as this website explains above, comet goldfish require filtration and aeration just like other aquarium fish. They shouldn't be kept in bowls. A full grown comet will require a minimum of a 30 gallon tank. Even a small 1 inch goldfish shouldn't be kept in anything smaller than 2 gallons, and that's for only one comet TEMPORARILY! If you're really wanting to keep a fish in a bowl, I would recommend a betta. Although they actually prefer a warmer temperature (78-82 degrees F), they usually live at room temperature with no problem. They will not require filtration as long as you change out the water once weekly (make sure you are using "conditioned" tap or well water or spring water, and make sure it is at about room temperature so as too not shock the fish). Bettas are also different from most fish in that they do not require aeration. Bettas actually breathe from the air/water surface. Keep in mind, however, that you can only have one betta per bowl/tank. *If you get a female betta (shorter fins), you can sometimes keep more than one per bowl/tank, but keep in mind that should the fish begin to fight, you will have to have a second container to separate them.

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  • Gia - 2014-07-05
    Actually bettas are quite a bit more demanding than gold fish, they DO NOT do well in bowls they need at minimum a 1.5 gallon tank and 2+ Gallons is better. They need filtration and some time of temp regulator (heater). To put any fish in a bowl with out a heater and filtration is cruel and shouldn't be done. Source: betta breeder for 15 years.
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Animal-World info on Marbled Lungfish
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Morris Agaba - 2014-07-06
I am a researcher interested in lung fish genetics. I am new to the fish world and have mostly worked with Zebra fish and tilapia. I am told by a colleague that it is difficult to tell physically a male from a female lungfish in the early stages. Anyone have and know male and know female specimens and is willing to send me specimens for DNA analysis?

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  • Clarice Brough - 2014-07-22
    What an interesting endeavor. I wish we could help, but have no specimens. However, we would love to hear what you learn as you proceed, and we wish you all the best!
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